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What's the best way to call a generic method when the type parameter isn't known at compile time, but instead is obtained dynamically at runtime?

Consider the following sample code - inside the Example() method, what's the most concise way to invoke GenericMethod() using the type stored in the myType variable?

public class Sample
{

    public void Example(string typeName)
    {
        Type myType = FindType(typeName);

        // what goes here to call GenericMethod<T>() ?    
        GenericMethod<myType>(); // This doesn't work

        // what changes to call StaticMethod<T>() ?
        Sample.StaticMethod<myType>(); // This also doesn't work
    }

    public void GenericMethod<T>()
    {   
        ...
    }

    public static void StaticMethod<T>()
    {   
        ...
    }    
}
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2  
I tried Jon's solution and could not get it to work until I made the generic method public in my class. I know that another Jon replied saying that you need to specify the bindingflags but this did not help. –  naskew Jun 14 '12 at 7:31
3  
You also need BindingFlags.Instance, not just BindingFlags.NonPublic, to get the private/internal method. –  Lars Kemmann Feb 15 '13 at 19:11
    
Modern version of this question: stackoverflow.com/q/2433436/103167 –  Ben Voigt Sep 12 at 16:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 323 down vote accepted

You need to use reflection to get the method to start with, then "construct" it by supplying type arguments with MakeGenericMethod:

MethodInfo method = typeof(Sample).GetMethod("GenericMethod");
MethodInfo generic = method.MakeGenericMethod(myType);
generic.Invoke(this, null);

EDIT: For a static method, pass null as the first argument to Invoke. That's nothing to do with generic methods - it's just normal reflection.

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30  
+1; note that GetMethod() only considers public instance methods by default, so you may need BindingFlags.Static and/or BindingFlags.NonPublic. –  Jon of All Trades Dec 16 '11 at 22:32
2  
The correct combination of flags is BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance (and optionally BindingFlags.Static). –  Lars Kemmann Feb 15 '13 at 19:10
    
@LarsKemmann: Why NonPublic when the desired method is public? –  Jon Skeet Feb 15 '13 at 22:08
    
Sorry, I should have specified; that was in reply to @Jon of All Trades's comment on how to get at non-public methods. Your answer is correct without any binding flags for public methods, of course. –  Lars Kemmann Feb 17 '13 at 5:00
1  
@ChrisMoschini: Added that to the answer. –  Jon Skeet Mar 22 '13 at 21:32

Just an addition to the original answer. While this will work:

MethodInfo method = typeof(Sample).GetMethod("GenericMethod");
MethodInfo generic = method.MakeGenericMethod(myType);
generic.Invoke(this, null);

It is also a little dangerous in that you lose compile-time check for GenericMethod. If you later do a refactoring and rename GenericMethod, this code won't notice and will fail at run time. Also, if there is any post-processing of the assembly (for example obfuscating or removing unused methods/classes) this code might break too.

So, if you know the method you are linking to at compile time, and this isn't called millions of times so overhead doesn't matter, I would change this code to be:

Action<> GenMethod = GenericMethod<int>;  //change int by any base type 
                                          //accepted by GenericMethod
MethodInfo method = this.GetType().GetMethod(GenMethod.Method.Name);
MethodInfo generic = method.MakeGenericMethod(myType);
generic.Invoke(this, null);

While not very pretty, you have a compile time reference to GenericMethod here, and if you refactor, delete or do anything with GenericMethod, this code will keep working, or at least break at compile time (if for example you remove GenericMethod).

Other way to do the same would be to create a new wrapper class, and create it through Activator. I don't know if there is a better way.

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2  
In cases where reflection is used to call a method, it's usual that the method name is itself discovered by another method. Knowing the method name in advance isn't common. –  Bevan Feb 27 '11 at 21:59
7  
Well, I agree for common uses of reflection. But the original question was how to call "GenericMethod<myType>()" If that syntax was allowed, we wouldn't need GetMethod() at all. But for the question "how do I write "GenericMethod<myType>"? I think the answer should include a way to avoid losing the compile-time link with GenericMethod. Now if this question is common or not I don't know, but I do know I had this exact problem yesterday, and that's why I landed in this question. –  Adrian Gallero Feb 28 '11 at 21:24
9  
You could do GenMethod.Method.GetGenericMethodDefinition() instead of this.GetType().GetMethod(GenMethod.Method.Name). It’s slightly cleaner and probably safer. –  Daniel Cassidy May 10 '11 at 10:10
    
What does mean "myType" in your sample? –  Clark Kent Dec 7 '11 at 13:45
    
"myType" is a variable that holds a Type. If we knew the type, we could do GenericMethod<Type>(), but since we have the type in a variable, we use reflection. –  Ryan Feb 14 '13 at 15:44

Calling generic method with type parameter known only at runtime can be greatly simplified by using dynamic type instead of reflection API.

To use this technique the type must be known from actual object (not just instance of Type class). Otherwise, you have to create object of that type or use the standard reflection API solution. You can create object by using Activator.CreateInstance method.

If you want to call a generic method that in "normal" usage would have had it's type inferred then it simply comes to casting object of unknown type to dynamic. Here's an example:

class Alpha { }    
class Beta { }    
class Service
{
    public void Process<T>(T item)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("item.GetType(): " + item.GetType() 
                          + "\ttypeof(T): " + typeof(T));
    }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var a = new Alpha();
        var b = new Beta();

        var service = new Service();
        service.Process(a); //same as "service.Process<Alpha>(a)"
        service.Process(b); //same as "service.Process<Beta>(b)"

        var objects = new object[] { a, b };
        foreach (var o in objects)
        {
            service.Process(o); //same as "service.Process<object>(o)"
        }
        foreach (var o in objects)
        {
            dynamic dynObj = o;
            service.Process(dynObj); //or write "service.Process((dynamic)o)"
        }
    }
}

and here's the output of this program:

item.GetType(): Alpha    typeof(T): Alpha
item.GetType(): Beta     typeof(T): Beta
item.GetType(): Alpha    typeof(T): System.Object
item.GetType(): Beta     typeof(T): System.Object
item.GetType(): Alpha    typeof(T): Alpha
item.GetType(): Beta     typeof(T): Beta

Process is generic instance method that writes the real type of passed argument (by using GetType() method) and the type of generic parameter (by using typeof operator).

By casting object argument to dynamic type we deferred providing type parameter until runtime. When the Process method is called with dynamic argument then compiler doesn't care about type of this argument. Compiler generates code that at runtime checks real types of passed arguments (by using reflection) and choose the best method to call. Here there is only this one generic methods so it's invoked with proper type parameter.

In this example the output is the the same as if you wrote:

foreach (var o in objects)
{
    MethodInfo method = typeof(Service).GetMethod("Process");
    MethodInfo generic = method.MakeGenericMethod(o.GetType());
    generic.Invoke(service, new object[] { o });
}

Version with dynamic type is definitely shorter and easier to write. You also shouldn't worry about performance of calling this function multiple times. The next call with arguments of the same type should be faster thanks to caching mechanism in DLR. Of course you can write code that cache invoked delegates but by using dynamic type you get this behaviour for free.

If the generic method you want to call don't have argument of parametrized type (so its type parameter can't be inferred). Then you can wrap invocation of generic method in a helper method like in the following example:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        object obj = new Alpha();

        Helper((dynamic)obj);
    }

    public static void Helper<T>(T obj)
    {
        GenericMethod<T>();
    }

    public static void GenericMethod<T>()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("GenericMethod<" + typeof(T) + ">");
    }
}

Increased type safety

What is really great about using dynamic object as a replacement for using reflection API is that you only lose compile time checking of this particular type that you don't know until runtime. Other arguments and the name of the method are staticly analysed by compiler as usual. If you remove or add more arguments, change their types or rename method name then you'll get compile-time error. This won't happen if you provide method name as string in Type.GetMethod and arguments as objects array in MethodInfo.Invoke.

Below is a simple example that illustrates how some errors can be caught at compile time (commented code) and other at runtime. It also shows how DLR tries to resolve which method to call.

interface IItem { }    
class FooItem : IItem { }
class BarItem : IItem { }

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var objects = new object[] { new FooItem(), new BarItem(), new Alpha() };
        for (int i = 0; i < objects.Length; i++)
        {
            ProcessItem((dynamic)objects[i], "test" + i, i);

            //ProcesItm((dynamic)objects[i], "test" + i, i); 
            //compiler error: The name 'ProcesItm' does not 
            //exist in the current context

            //ProcessItem((dynamic)objects[i], "test" + i); 
            //error: No overload for method 'ProcessItem' takes 2 arguments
        }
    }

    static string ProcessItem<T>(T item, string text, int number) 
        where T : IItem
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Generic ProcessItem<{0}>, text {1}, number:{2}",
                          typeof(T), text, number);
        return "OK";
    }    
    static void ProcessItem(BarItem item, string text, int number)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ProcessItem with Bar, " + text + ", " + number);
    }
}

Here we again execute some method by casting argument to dynamic type. Only verification of first argument's type is postponed to runtime. You will get a compiler error if the name of the method you're calling doesn't exist or if other arguments are invalid (wrong number of arguments or wrong types).

When you pass dynamic argument to method then this call is lately bound. Method overload resolution happens at runtime and tries to choose the best overload. So if you invoke ProcessItem method with object of BarItem type then you'll actually call non generic method because it is better match for this type. However, you'll get runtime error when you pass argument of Alpha type because there's no method that can handle this object. But that's the whole point. Compiler don't have information that this call is valid. You as a programmer know this and you should make sure that this code runs without errors.

Return type gotcha

When your call non-void method with parameter of dynamic type, its return type will probably be dynamic too. So if you'd change previous example to this code:

var result = ProcessItem((dynamic)testObjects[i], "test" + i, i);

then type of result object would be dynamic. This is because compiler don't always know which method will be called. If you know the return type of function call then you should implicitly convert it to required type so the rest of code is statical typed:

string result = ProcessItem((dynamic)testObjects[i], "test" + i, i);

You'll get runtime error if type doesn't match.

Actually if you try to get result value in previous example then you'll get a runtime error in second loop iteration. This is because you tried to save return value of a void function.

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This is the same as a question I asked the other week: Reflection and generic types

I then covered how to call a generic overloaded method on my blog: http://www.aaron-powell.com/reflection-and-generics

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2  
Your link resulted in 404 error. :-( –  Mark Good Nov 28 '10 at 2:36
    
the correct link is aaron-powell.com/reflection-and-generics - in short, he's suggesting to use Linq: MethodInfo method = typeof(Helper).GetMethods(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static).First(m => m.Name == "GetPropertyValue" && m.GetParameters().Count() == 3); –  zcrar70 May 25 '11 at 15:40
    
I read the link on your blog, and I think you can avoid the LINQ call and use type.GetMethod(methodName, bindingFlags, null, types, null) where types is an array of the three types you expect for your parameters for the specific overload you want. –  Bernard Chen Feb 20 at 1:37

With C# 4.0 reflection isn't necessary as the DLR can call it using runtime types. Since using the dlr library is kind of a pain dynamically (instead of the C# compiler generating code for you), the open source framework Dynamitey (PCL) gives you easy cached run time access to the same calls the compiler would generate for you.

var name = InvokeMemberName.Create;
Dynamic.InvokeMemberAction(this, name("GenericMethod", new[]{myType}));


var staticContext = InvokeContext.CreateStatic;
Dynamic.InvokeMemberAction(staticContext(typeof(Sample)), name("StaticMethod", new[]{myType}));
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