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I want to redefine NULL in my program such as

#define MYNULL ((void*)0)

But this definition is not working in the following statement:

char *ch = MYNULL;

Error : can not convert from void* to char *

What would be the best way to define NULL?

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11  
Which language? C or C++, they're very different languages –  Binary Worrier Feb 24 '10 at 11:43
14  
And why do you think you need to do this? –  anon Feb 24 '10 at 11:46
    
Can you change the name of the variable ch to something else (like str) as it's likely to confuse someone reading it quickly who might infer you're interested in NUL handling please. (But my real question is (as @Neil Butterworth asked), WHY?) (Or can you clarify what you're hoping to achieve? Are you trying to have a single manifest constant have double duty as both a pointer and a NUL character? –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 24 '10 at 12:04
4  
As it stands this is just a bad question, as you almost certainly shouldn't be doing this. Perhaps if you explain what your motivation is, the rationale might be clearer? –  Draemon Feb 24 '10 at 12:21
4  
This is a worrying question - indicative of doing something bad. –  Joe Gauterin Feb 24 '10 at 12:53

8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted
#ifdef __cplusplus
#define MYNULL 0
#else
#define MYNULL ((void*)0)
#endif

will work in both of them.

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3  
-1 This is a Bad Idea as covered in the other answers –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 24 '10 at 12:27
7  
The question was 'how to define NULL using #define in C++ and C', as I understood it, it wasn't 'what to do with NULL if I wait till someone implements c++0x well', or 'are there any caveats using NULL'. Why don't you just assume that cppdev KNOWS exactly is he doing, and just wants answer to this question? This is what I hate about stackoverflow - Usually I've got reasons for using my solutions, and don't want tips how to do it some other way. (well, the question doesn't have premises to assume this). Use your magic orbs and other future-seeing accessories for something more interesting. –  Yossarian Feb 24 '10 at 13:22
2  
@Yossarian: Part of a good question (deserving of many upvotes) is to FizzBin and/or otherwise establish what you have and havent tried to do on your road to deciding to bother the LazyWeb with your Important Question). And dont worry about being the only person on the planet that gets irked by SO and it's many + and (not so many) - points (in every sense of the term) :P But while we're splitting hairs, you really do think that, measured against all the other answers on the site, this one is uniquely worthy of 96 rep? (And no, my answer isnt worth 60 - its a dup of a comment). Go Johannnes! –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 24 '10 at 13:28
1  
I don't mind the - points, I just don't like your argumentation. –  Yossarian Feb 24 '10 at 13:31
2  
Give me a -1 with a comment and someone willing to stand over their opinion and/or justify it with an explanation of why they feel its correct over a -1 any day. For subtle things like this question, letting mob rule sort things out based on potentially flawed understanding using downvotes to cancel out upvotes based on incomplete understandings is just not good enough. I have to say this nonsense happens a lot more on the tags on this question compared to others I look at. As I say, we all hate SO :( –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 24 '10 at 13:41
#define MYNULL NULL

is the safest, I see no reason in doing so but if you really want to, go ahead. Here's how C and C++ do it respectively:

#define NULL 0 //C++
#define NULL ((void*)0) //C

Generally speaking, defining 0 for NULL is a bad habit, you actually want it to be part of the language. C++0x adresses this.

This is what Bjarne Stroustrup has to say on this:

Should I use NULL or 0?

In C++, the definition of NULL is 0, so there is only an aesthetic difference. I prefer to avoid macros, so I use 0. Another problem with NULL is that people sometimes mistakenly believe that it is different from 0 and/or not an integer. In pre-standard code, NULL was/is sometimes defined to something unsuitable and therefore had/has to be avoided. That's less common these days. If you have to name the null pointer, call it nullptr; that's what it's going to be called in C++0x. Then, "nullptr" will be a keyword.

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What exactly is the problem with getting your NULL from where you're supposed to?, i.e.,

#include <stddef.h>

or

 #include <cstddef>

as alluded to in @Johannes Rudolph's answer, any trickery you do is not likely be very future proof in the face of things like nullptr etc.

EDIT: while stdlib (and many others) are mandated to include a NULL, stddef is the most canonical header [and has been for decades].

PS In general, it's just a bad idea to get involved in this sort of trickery unless you have a really good reason. You didnt expand on the thinking that led you to feeling the need to do this. If you could add some detail on that, it's likely to lead to better answers. Other people answering the question should have pointed this out in their answers too, but I guess does FGITW as FGITW does best :D

EDIT 2: As pointed out by @Yossarian: The single justification for doing this is if there isnt a NULL defined in an appropriately language-agnostic form elsewhere in your system. Naked compilers with no headers and/or if you're writing your own custom standard library from scratch are examples of such a circumstance. (In such a bare-bones scenario, I'd go with @lilburne's answer (be sure to use 0 as much as possible))

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1  
+1 for suggesting to go with the standard. –  legends2k Feb 24 '10 at 11:59
    
@legends2k: Seems obvious to me (and @Neil Butterworth in the comments on the question but nobody +1'd that before me), but I guess people like solving puzzles that dont need to be solved. –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 24 '10 at 12:02
    
@Ruben: Programmers, you see ;) –  legends2k Feb 24 '10 at 12:32
    
@legends2k: You mean 'Hackers' ! I guess people aren't on this site because they believe everything on the planet that need's saying has already been said :P –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 24 '10 at 12:34
1  
@-1er: Care to explain your downvote? if you have a reason why this is a wrong-headed answer, the world could benefit from the sharing of the reasoning. (I can offer a bunch of speculation and what-if's as to the identity of the mysterious voter if you wish!) –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 24 '10 at 14:11
#define MYNULL 0

will work in C++

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2  
This will work only for C++. C needs NULL to be #defined as (void *)0. –  Paul R Feb 24 '10 at 11:45
    
Thanks!! It worked! –  cppdev Feb 24 '10 at 11:46
    
So what is the best way it would work both in c and c++ –  cppdev Feb 24 '10 at 11:47
1  
@Paul: defining NULL as 0 works fine in C, just you lose a slight bit of type safety. However, using 0 properly for NULL in C won't create any errors. If you are going to rebut with the varargs sentinel value, it is recommend to case to char* even when using NULL –  Evan Teran Feb 25 '10 at 17:55
    
@Evan - you're right - I checked - thanks for correcting me ! –  Paul R Feb 25 '10 at 18:53

I think that anyone that doesn't know that setting a pointer in C/C++ to 0 is the same as setting it to NULL, nullptr, or any other equivalent shouldn't be messing with code. The difference in readability between

char* ch = NULL

and

char* ch = 0;

is minimal. When it comes to expressions the forms

if (NULL == ch) {
}
if (0 == ch) {
}
if (nullptr == ch) {
}

are no more readable than

if (!ch) {
}
share|improve this answer
    
@lilburne: Bringing nullptr into your example muddies things rather than clarifying them. nullptr has a purpose and isnt always 100% interchangeable with NULL. But I agree with the general point that for most usages one should consider preferring 0 and implicit cooercion to int to NULL. (But it's not getting a +1 from me while it's conflating these issues :D) –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 24 '10 at 13:01

Don't do this. There is nothing that says that NULL has to be the value zero, it's implementation specific.

It could be a value that represents the end of memory, some special place in memory, or even an object that represents no value exists.

Doing this is very dangerous, may break portability, and will most certainly screw with code-aware editors. It isn't buying you anything, trust your library's definition.

EDIT: Evan is correct! The code itself will say zero, under the hood the compiler can do what it wants with implementation specific details. Thanks Evan!

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this is a common mis-interpretation of the standard. The null pointer constant is 0. However the null pointer value (not exposed at a language level, so never your concern) may be machine specific. C99 standard 6.3.2.3: "An integer constant expression with the value 0, or such an expression cast to type void *, is called a null pointer constant.55) If a null pointer constant is converted to a pointer type, the resulting pointer, called a null pointer, is guaranteed to compare unequal to a pointer to any object or function." Which basically says "0 used in a pointer context is NULL." –  Evan Teran Feb 25 '10 at 19:46
    
    
@Walt: no problem, I'll remove my -1 now :-). –  Evan Teran Feb 27 '10 at 16:47

In contrast to what some people state here, 0 is a perfectly valid definition for NULL in C. Thus you have to be careful when you give NULL as an argument to a variadic function, because it may be mistaken as the integer value 0, ending in non-portability.

http://c-faq.com/null/null2.html

BTW, the comp.lang.c FAQ is a highly recommended read for every C programmer. See for example here:

http://c-faq.com/null/null1.html

containing such gems of nearly-forgotten wisdom like "As mentioned above, there is a null pointer for each pointer type, and the internal values of null pointers for different types may be different." Which means that calloc or memset are NOT a portable initialization for pointers.

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#define NULL 0 //for C

is the perfect definition in C

e.g.

char *ch = NULL ;
*ch++ ;// will cause error

it causes error since ch pointing to nothing while executing increment statement is known by compiler by seeing the value of pointer in LOOK-UP table to be 0

if u try to update this pointer then u are actually changing the contents of CODE region which start at 0 physical address. FOR that reason the first entry of page table prior to code region starts is kept empty

What exactly is the problem with getting your NULL from where you're supposed to?, i.e.,

#include <stddef.h>

or

#include <cstddef>

as alluded to in @Johannes Rudolph's answer, any trickery you do is not likely be very future proof in the face of things like nullptr etc.

EDIT: while stdlib (and many others) are mandated to include a NULL, stddef is the most canonical header [and has been for decades].

PS In general, it's just a bad idea to get involved in this sort of trickery unless you have a really good reason. You didnt expand on the thinking that led you to feeling the need to do this. If you could add some detail on that, it's likely to lead to better answers. Other people answering the question should have pointed this out in their answers too, but I guess does FGITW as FGITW does best :D

EDIT 2: As pointed out by @Yossarian: The single justification for doing this is if there isnt a NULL defined in an appropriately language-agnostic form elsewhere in your system. Naked compilers with no headers and/or if you're writing your own custom standard library from scratch are examples of such a circumstance. (In such a bare-bones scenario, I'd go with @lilburne's answer (be sure to use 0 as much as possible))

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