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I'm loading a Collada (.dae file) and the model has 2 objects. The first which is a cloth with alot of vertices with a light blue material. And the second a box which the cloth is supposed to fold around as it falls down.

This is supposed to be a 250 frame animation, but I'm not sure if it actually is or not. When I load it into Assimp's aiScene* it says HasAnimation() == 0... It also says that the mesh for the cloth has no color, with the HasVertexColors() == 0 Which has me worried I have to take another look at exporting it. I don't know, maybe you can tell? I'll link it on an external side as it is too large for this post. (Sorry for that)

Falling Cloth (Collada animation .dae): http://pastebin.com/54LkKq8k

My problem is that I don't see the light blue cloth, and the box is black, as in (0, 0, 0)...

Initializing VBO:

void AssimpMesh::initMesh(aiMesh *mesh, MeshData *data) {
    //Buffer for temporary storage of new ids
    GLuint id;

    //Make vertex array
    glGenVertexArrays(1, &id);
    data->meshArray = id;

    //Tell OpenGL to use this array
    glBindVertexArray(id);

    //Assign vertices
    if (mesh->HasPositions()) {
        //Make buffer
        glGenBuffers(1, &id);
        data->buffers.push_back(id);
        data->bufferNames.push_back("Positions");

        //Set buffer data
        glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, id);
        glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(aiVector3D) * mesh->mNumVertices, &mesh->mVertices[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW);

        //Set shader attribute data
        glEnableVertexAttribArray(VBO_VERTEX);
        glVertexAttribPointer(VBO_VERTEX, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, NULL, NULL);
    }

    //Assign colors
    if (mesh->HasVertexColors(0)) {
        //Make buffer
        glGenBuffers(1, &id);
        data->buffers.push_back(id);
        data->bufferNames.push_back("Colors");

        //Set buffer data
        glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, id);
        glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(aiColor4D) * mesh->mNumVertices, &mesh->mColors[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW);

        //Set shader attribute data
        glEnableVertexAttribArray(VBO_COLOR);
        glVertexAttribPointer(VBO_COLOR, 4, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, NULL, NULL);
    }

    //Assign texture coords
    if (mesh->HasTextureCoords(0)) {
        //Make buffer
        glGenBuffers(1, &id);
        data->buffers.push_back(id);
        data->bufferNames.push_back("TextureCoords");

        //Set buffer data
        glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, id);
        glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(aiVector3D) * mesh->mNumVertices, &mesh->mTextureCoords[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW);

        //Set shader attribute data
        glEnableVertexAttribArray(VBO_TEXCORD);
        glVertexAttribPointer(VBO_TEXCORD, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, NULL, NULL);
    }

    //Assign colors
    if (mesh->HasNormals()) {
        //Make buffer
        glGenBuffers(1, &id);
        data->buffers.push_back(id);
        data->bufferNames.push_back("Normals");

        //Set buffer data
        glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, id);
        glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(aiVector3D) * mesh->mNumVertices, &mesh->mNormals[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW);

        //Set shader attribute data
        glEnableVertexAttribArray(VBO_NORMAL);
        glVertexAttribPointer(VBO_NORMAL, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, NULL, NULL);
    }

    if (mesh->HasFaces()) {
        vector <unsigned int> indices;
        aiFace face;
        for (int i = 0; i < mesh->mNumFaces; i++) {
            face = mesh->mFaces[i];
            for (int j = 0; j < face.mNumIndices; j++) {
                indices.push_back(face.mIndices[j]);
            }
        }

        //Make buffer
        glGenBuffers(1, &id);
        data->buffers.push_back(id);
        data->bufferNames.push_back("Faces");

        //Set buffer data
        glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, id);
        glBufferData(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(unsigned int) * indices.size(), &indices.front(), GL_STATIC_DRAW);
    }

    //Unbind vertex array
    glBindVertexArray(NULL);
}

Draw model:

void AssimpMesh::draw() {
    //Draw all vertex arrays
    aiMesh *mesh;
    aiFace face;
    MeshData *data;
    for (int i = 0; i < meshes.size(); i++) {
        mesh = scene->mMeshes[i];
        face = mesh->mFaces[0];
        data = meshes[i];

        //Tell OpenGL to use this array
        glBindVertexArray(data->meshArray);

        //Tell OpenGL which shader to use
        glUseProgram(data->program);

        //Draw the elements of the array
        glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, face.mNumIndices * mesh->mNumFaces, GL_UNSIGNED_INT, 0);
    }

    //Unbind vertex array
    glBindVertexArray(NULL);

    //Unbind shader
    glUseProgram(NULL);
}

Vertex shader:

#version 120

attribute vec3 vertex;
attribute vec4 color;
attribute vec3 texCoord;
attribute vec3 normal;

uniform mat4 transform;

varying vec3 shared_color;
varying vec2 shared_texCoord;
varying vec3 shared_normal;

void main() {
    gl_Position = transform * vec4(vertex, 1.0);

    //Send data to fragment shader
    shared_color = color.xyz;
    shared_texCoord = texCoord.xy;
    shared_normal = (transform * vec4(normal, 0.0)).xyz;
}

Fragment shader:

#version 120

uniform sampler2D diffuse;
uniform int flagTexture;

varying vec3 shared_color;
varying vec2 shared_texCoord;
varying vec3 shared_normal;

void main() {
    vec4 color = vec4(shared_color, 1);
    vec4 texture = texture2D(diffuse, shared_texCoord);
    vec4 finalColor = color;

    if (flagTexture >= 1) {
        finalColor = vec4(mix(color.rgb, texture.bgr, texture.a), 1);
        //finalColor = color * texture;
    }

    float shade = 0;
    if (shade >= 1) {
        vec3 lightPosition = vec3(0, 0, -1);
        float shadowDarkness = 0.8;
        vec3 actualLightPos = vec3(-lightPosition.x, lightPosition.y, lightPosition.z);
        float lightStrength = clamp(dot(actualLightPos, shared_normal), 1 - shadowDarkness, 1.0);
        vec4 litColor = finalColor * lightStrength;
        finalColor = litColor;
    }

    gl_FragColor = finalColor;
}
share|improve this question
    
I'd start out with 16-bit indices (GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT). If you need to draw more than 65K vertices you can add an extra property to use a larger element type. –  Andon M. Coleman Apr 23 at 23:29
    
Given that this was a suggestion to the way I'm currently doing it, I assume I've understood the vertex arrays correctly? =) –  Aleksander Fimreite Apr 23 at 23:36
    
You shouldn't use the NULL constant, it's icky in almost all situations :L also, you're not "unbinding" the vertex array, you're re-binding the default vertex array. –  CoffeeandCode Apr 24 at 0:00
    
To be honest, I am too tired right now to look at this in any detail. That was the simplest thing I could think of to comment on ;) Binding 0 to the VAO may be completely unnecessary though assuming this is the one and only class you use to manage vertex arrays. The fewer times you change an object binding in GL, the less validation overhead you have to deal with - granted vertex array state changes are some of the least expensive of all state changes behind uniforms. There's not a whole lot to validate, unlike changing GLSL program or FBO bindings, which is very complicated. –  Andon M. Coleman Apr 24 at 0:00
    
You should keep your buffers stored with your vertex arrays, they depend on them! When you bind your vertex array, the buffers bound to it will be used. This should be shown more concisely in your code. I'd suggest storing your buffers like this (if you need naming) : std::map<std::string, std::tuple<GLuint, GLuint, GLuint>> or something you prefer instead of tuple. you should definitely keep your buffers with their appropriate vertex array object anyway. –  CoffeeandCode Apr 24 at 0:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I see a couple of problems here after looking at the documentation of the library you're using:

  • For the colors, the type you get is aiColor4D. At the name suggests, that's a class containing 4 floats. But you're passing 3 for the size to the corresponding call to glVertexAttribPointer().
  • For the texture coordinates, the type is aiVector3D, which contains 3 floats. But you're passing 2 for the size to the corresponding call to glVertexAttribPointer().
  • aiFace is a class that contains an index count and a pointer to the indices for the face. You can't just pass an array of these guys to glBufferData() as your indices. Effectively, you're passing a sequence of index counts and pointers instead of a sequence of indices.
  • The second argument to glDrawElements() is the number of indices, not the number of triangles.

Let us know how it goes once these are fixed. Another common source of errors is how the vertex attributes are tied to the vertex shader, which is code we don't see here.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems very promising. I'm not well oriented. I couldn't find much documentation, so I just guess based on what VS told me things returned and checked stuff out in debugging. But I'll have a look ;) –  Aleksander Fimreite Apr 24 at 4:32
    
Not very apparent at least in my browser, but the aiFace at the start of the 3rd bullet point is a link to the documentation I found. –  Reto Koradi Apr 24 at 4:53
    
I noticed. I got i SORT of working now, I'm supposed to see a light blue cloth above a colorful cube. But now I see a black cube only... –  Aleksander Fimreite Apr 24 at 4:59

1) Does it work?

Did you test it? It looks like it should render correctly, although your deallocation doesn't look right. glDelete* takes a pointer for its second argument; you're passing a reference to the front element.

Change it to this:

for (int i = 0; i < buffers.size(); i++) {
    glDeleteBuffers(buffers[i].size(), &buffers[i].front());
}

glDeleteVertexArrays(meshes.size(), &meshes.front());

2) Is it any good?

It's a pretty standard rendering loop, the speed of it depends almost entirely on how complex your shaders are. ALTHOUGH I would make the change of declaring a pointer outside of the loop then re-assigning it, rather than declaring a new pointer for every mesh:

aiMesh *mesh;
for (int i = 0; i < meshes.size(); i++) {
    mesh = scene->mMeshes[i];

    //Tell OpenGL to use this array
    glBindVertexArray(meshes[i]);

    //Draw the elements of the array
    glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, mesh->mNumFaces, GL_UNSIGNED_INT, 0);
}

3) Extra info

It has a terrible little math library included with it that I would never recommend, but you should know anyway for handling vertices and thing later on (e.g. when you map your buffers later)

So if you want to map your GL_ARRAY_BUFFER to modify the vertices stored, you'd have to use something like this:

glBindVertexArray(the_vao);
aiVector3D *data = reinterpret_cast<aiVector3D*>(glMapBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, GL_READ_WRITE));

// do all the changes!

glUnmapBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER);
share|improve this answer
    
I changed it to be pointers, which in face was being noticed by the compiler as well after a VS restart. (It tend to stop detecting it sometimes) –  Aleksander Fimreite Apr 24 at 1:28
    
I added a shader and it runs without crashes, but I can't see the model either... =/ –  Aleksander Fimreite Apr 24 at 1:28

I looked in the documentation and saw that the HasVertexColors() was not actually the diffuse value from the material i wanted. So I solved this by using the material indexed in the mesh and extracted the diffuse color into an array of size mNumVertices.

unsigned int matId = mesh->mMaterialIndex;
aiMaterial *material = scene->mMaterials[matId];
vector <aiColor3D> colors;
aiColor3D diffuse(0, 0, 0);
material->Get(AI_MATKEY_COLOR_DIFFUSE, diffuse);

for (int i = 0; i < mesh->mNumVertices; i++) {
    colors.push_back(diffuse);
}
share|improve this answer

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