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I'm currently self-learning Python, and I'm reading 'Problem Solving with Algorithms and Data Structures' (Brad Miller, David Ranum). I've stumbled upon the basic example of inheritance. Although I can see what it does, I need an explanation, how it works actually. The Code is as follows:

class LogicGate:

    def __init__(self,n):
        self.name = n
        self.output = None

    def getName(self):
        return self.name

    def getOutput(self):
        self.output = self.performGateLogic()
        return self.output


class BinaryGate(LogicGate):

    def __init__(self,n):
        LogicGate.__init__(self,n)

        self.pinA = None
        self.pinB = None

    def getPinA(self):
        if self.pinA == None:
            return int(input("Enter Pin A input for gate "+self.getName()+"-->"))
        else:
            return self.pinA.getFrom().getOutput()

    def getPinB(self):
        if self.pinB == None:
            return int(input("Enter Pin B input for gate "+self.getName()+"-->"))
        else:
            return self.pinB.getFrom().getOutput()

    def setNextPin(self,source):
        if self.pinA == None:
            self.pinA = source
        else:
            if self.pinB == None:
                self.pinB = source
            else:
                print("Cannot Connect: NO EMPTY PINS on this gate")


class AndGate(BinaryGate):

    def __init__(self,n):
        BinaryGate.__init__(self,n)

    def performGateLogic(self):

        a = self.getPinA()
        b = self.getPinB()
        if a==1 and b==1:
            return 1
        else:
            return 0

class OrGate(BinaryGate):

    def __init__(self,n):
        BinaryGate.__init__(self,n)

    def performGateLogic(self):

        a = self.getPinA()
        b = self.getPinB()
        if a ==1 or b==1:
            return 1
        else:
            return 0

class UnaryGate(LogicGate):

    def __init__(self,n):
        LogicGate.__init__(self,n)

        self.pin = None

    def getPin(self):
        if self.pin == None:
            return int(input("Enter Pin input for gate "+self.getName()+"-->"))
        else:
            return self.pin.getFrom().getOutput()

    def setNextPin(self,source):
        if self.pin == None:
            self.pin = source
        else:
            print("Cannot Connect: NO EMPTY PINS on this gate")


class NotGate(UnaryGate):

    def __init__(self,n):
        UnaryGate.__init__(self,n)

    def performGateLogic(self):
        if self.getPin():
            return 0
        else:
            return 1


class Connector:

    def __init__(self, fgate, tgate):
        self.fromgate = fgate
        self.togate = tgate

        tgate.setNextPin(self)

    def getFrom(self):
        return self.fromgate

    def getTo(self):
        return self.togate


def main():
   g1 = AndGate("G1")
   g2 = AndGate("G2")
   g3 = OrGate("G3")
   g4 = NotGate("G4")
   c1 = Connector(g1,g3)
   c2 = Connector(g2,g3)
   c3 = Connector(g3,g4)
   print(g4.getOutput())

main()

I'm mostly doubted by the tgate.setNextPin(self) statement in Connector class __init__. Is it a method call? If it is, why is it called with just one parameter, when there are two actually required by the setNexPin function in UnaryGate and BinaryGate classes (self, source)? How does the fromgate variable ends up as the source arrgument? Does this statement 'initiliaze' anything actually, and what?

Next thing which troubles me is, for example, when I print(type(g4)) before declaring g4.getOutput(), I get <class '__main__.OrGate'>, but when the g4.getOutput() starts, and functions start calling each other, to the point of calling getPin function, if I put print (self.pinA) before return self.pinA.getFrom().getOutput(), I get the <__main__.Connector object at 0x2b387e2f74d0>, although self.Pin is a variable from g4 OrGate instance. How can one variable from one class instance can become object of another class, which isn't inheriting it? Does this have something with a work of setNextPin() function?

Can someone explain this to me as I am new to OOP and thorougly confused by this piece of code. Thank you.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Regarding your first question, tgate.setNextPin(self) is a method call. tgate is an object, presumably an instance of one of the gate types. When you access instance.method, Python gives you a "bound method" object, which works pretty much like a function, but which puts the instance in as the first argument when it is actually called. So, tgate.setNextPin(self) is really calling type(tgate).setNextPin(tgate, self)

Your second question seems to reflect a misunderstanding of what attributes are. There's no requirement that an object's attributes be of its own type. In the various LogicGate sub-classes, the pin/pinA/pinB attributes are either going to be None (signaling that the user should be prompted for an input value) or an instance of a Connector (or something else with a getFrom method). Neither of those values is a LogicGate instance.

As for where the Connector instance you saw came from, its going to be one of the c1 through c3 values you created. Connector instances install themselves onto a pin of their tgate argument, with the setNextPin call you were asking about in your first question. I can't really speak to the g4 gate you are looking at, as it seems to be different than the g4 variable created in your example code's main() function (it is a different type), but I suspect that it is working as designed, and it's just a bit confusing. Try accessing the pinX attributes via g4.pinA rather than inspecting them inside of the methods and you may have a bit less confusion.

Here's a bit of code with outputs that should help you understand things a bit better:

# create a few gates
g1 = AndGate("G1")
g2 = OrGate("G2")

# at this point, no connectors have been hooked up, so all pinX attrs are None:
print("G1 pins:", g1.pinA, g1.pinB) # "None, None"
print("G2 pins:", g2.pinA, g2.pinB) # "None, None"

# test that the gates work independently of each other:
print("G1 output:", g1.getOutput()) # will prompt for two inputs, then print their AND
print("G2 output:", g2.getOutput()) # will prompt for two inputs, then print their OR

# create a connection between the gates
c1 = Connector(g1, g2) # connects output of g1 to first available pin (pinA) of g2

# we can see that g2.pinA has changed
print("G2 pins after connection:", g2.pinA, g2.pinB)
   # "<__main__.Connector object at SomeHexAddress>, None"

# now, if we get g2's output, it will automatically request g1's output via the Connector
print("G2 output:", g2.getOutput())
   # will prompt for 2 G1 inputs, and one G2 input and print (G1_A AND G1_B) OR G2_B

If you want to play around with these classes more, you might want to add a __str__ (and/or __repr__) method to some or all of the classes. __str__ is used by Python to convert an instance of the class into a string whenever necessary (such as when you pass it as an argument to print or str.format). Here's a quick __str__ implementation for Connector:

def __str__(self):
    return "Connector between {} and {}".format(self.fgate.name, self.tgate.name)
share|improve this answer
    
When I visualize my code in the online visualizer, and when the setNextPin function is executed by creating Connector object c1 = Connector(g1,g3), and calling tgate.setNextPin(self) and frame is created, self points to the OrGate (g3) object which is tgate parameter, and source points to the fgate Connector object. So, the passed source argument is not really tgate but rather fgate. I'm still doubted by that how the fgate argument gets passed in a tgate.setNextPin(self) statement`. –  Reloader Apr 24 at 11:25
    
I don't think source comes from fgate (which is g1), but from self in the call made in Connection.__init__. Your call stack begins with main(), which is running the statement c1 = Connection(g1, g3). Next is Connection.__init__(<c1>, g1, g3) which is running tgate.setNextPin(self) (I'm putting c1 in angle brackets because it isn't bound to that name yet). That resolves to BinaryGate.setNextPin(g3, <c1>), which is the top of the stack. –  Blckknght Apr 24 at 19:54
    
Have a look at this link: goo.gl/nSpm4g , it shows the code visualization a step after tgate.setNextPin(self) is executed, setNextPin function called, and the frame created. self points to the togate Connector instance or G3 (OrGate) instance, and source points to the fromgate Connector instance, or G1 (AndGate) instance. I'm still confused by this and would like you to have a look at it. Thanks. –  Reloader Apr 26 at 8:38
    
@Reloader: I think you are misreading the visualization somehow. Everything I see there is as I would expect. In setNextPin, the self parameter has only one value, the OrGate with name attribute G3. Don't get confused by the self parameter in the previous frame, which is completely unrelated! –  Blckknght Apr 26 at 11:07
    
I see the blue arrow coming from the setNextPin frame, self argument (the right arrow), connecting with the arrow which comes from togate Connector instance, and they are connected in the place of OrGate output attribute. –  Reloader Apr 26 at 11:57

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