Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I like JavaScript so far, and decided to use Node.js as my engine partly because of this, which claims that Node.js offers TCO. However, when I try to run this (obviously tail-calling) code with Node.js, it causes a stack overflow:

function foo(x) {
    if (x == 1) {
        return 1;
    }
    else {
        return foo(x-1);
    }
}

foo(100000);

Now, I did some digging, and I found this. Here, it seems to say I should write it like this:

function* foo(x) {
    if (x == 1) {
        return 1;
    }
    else {
        yield foo(x-1);
    }
}

foo(100000);

However, this gives me syntax errors. I've tried various permutations of it, but in all cases, Node.js seems unhappy with something.

Essentially, I'd like to know the following:

  1. Does or doesn't Node.js do TCO?
  2. How does this magical yield thing work in Node.js?
share|improve this question
1  
Run node with the --harmony flag to see how your second version works. e.g. node --harmony mytest.js. But first re-look at the example you cite, you have only adapted part of it to your case. Regarding TCO the real question is whether V8 has implemented it - and there is no mention of that being done yet in the v8 changelog that I can see. –  barry-johnson Apr 24 '14 at 5:48
    
@barry-johnson: I tried just copying the sample functions using yield in the second link, and Node.js takes exception to function*. This is one of the reasons why I'm confused. –  Koz Ross Apr 24 '14 at 6:02
    
That is why I said you need to run node with the --harmony option. Generators are part of ES6/Harmony, which is not the node default. –  barry-johnson Apr 24 '14 at 13:04

2 Answers 2

Does or doesn't Node.js do TCO?

Not yet. This isn't a NodeJS thing, it's a V8 thing. NodeJS uses the Google V8 JavaScript engine. As I write this, V8 doesn't have tail-call optimization, but of course it will have, as it's part of the ES6 specification.

How does this magical yield thing work in Node.js?

Also not a NodeJS thing, it's a next-generation (ES6) JavaScript thing implemented by V8. Provided you have a recent version of NodeJS, you can enable it by passing the --harmony_generators flag:

node --harmony_generators yourscript.js

Generator functions (ones written with function* and using yield) work by being able to stop and return an iterator that captures their state and can be used to continue their state on a subsequent occasion. Alex Rauschmeyer has an in-depth article on them here.

Functions that return iterators can be used with the new of syntax, or you can just use the iterator directly.

Here's an example that works in NodeJS 0.12.3:

"use strict";
(function() {
    function* counter(from, to) {
        var n = from;
        do {
            yield n;
        }
        while (++n < to);
    }

    for (var v of counter(0, 5)) {
        console.log(v);
    }
})();

That has this output:

0
1
2
3
4

There are two workarounds there for ES6 features that V8 doesn't have:

  1. Many ES6 features aren't available yet at global scope, which is why I have an inline-invoked function expression around everything.

  2. ES6's let isn't yet supported, so I've used var.

Here's a second example showing using the iterator explicitly rather than with of:

"use strict";
(function() {
    function* counter(from, to) {
        var n = from;
        do {
            yield n;
        }
        while (++n < to);
    }
    var it = counter(0, 5);
    var entry;
    while (!(entry = it.next()).done) {
        console.log(entry.value);
    }
})();
share|improve this answer

Node.js doesn't optimize tail-call. The code below is a simple test.

function f(n){ return (n==1)? 1: f(n-1); }
f(100) // 1
f(1e10) // RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

I don't know about the "yield" but I created TCO library recently.

https://github.com/atmarksharp/tco-js/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.