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I have a column with data in a special “format”. Example:

L100000
L50
L5
S10
S15L10
S20
S90
S10
S10L5
S10L40
S10L5

The value consists of an “S” and/or an “L”, each with a number following the letter. I need to write a query, which will return two columns, “S” and “L”, which will have only the coresponding numeric value following the letter.
The above example should look like this:

S         L  
========  ==========
0         100000
0         50
0         5
10        0
15        10
20        0
90        0
10        0
10        5
10        40
10        5

If no "S" or "L" is found, the default value is zero.

share|improve this question
1  
Is there some reason why these aren't inserted in separate columns in the first place? It would be much easier to create a computed column that puts them back together than write a function that parses and extracts the values. –  tvanfosson Feb 24 '10 at 13:06
3  
I'm importing data from a ... let's call it "interesting" ... legacy database, where the developer chose to store multiple values in a single nvarchar column. I'm trying to clean it up, and split the data into separate columns in an import routine. –  Jakob Gade Feb 24 '10 at 13:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

try this:

DECLARE @YourTable table (RowValue varchar(30))

INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('L100000')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('L50')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('L5')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('S10')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('S15L10')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('S20')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('S90')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('S10')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('S10L5')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('S10L40')
INSERT INTO @YourTable VALUES ('S10L5')

SELECT
    CASE
        WHEN LocationS>0 AND LocationL=0 THEN RIGHT(RowValue,Length-1)
        WHEN LocationS>0 THEN SUBSTRING(RowValue,2,LocationL-2)
        ELSE NULL
    END AS S
    ,CASE
         WHEN LocationS=0 AND LocationL>0 THEN RIGHT(RowValue,Length-1)
         WHEN LocationS>0 AND LocationL>0 THEN RIGHT(RowValue,Length-LocationL)
         ELSE NULL
     END AS L
    ,RowValue
    FROM (SELECT
              RowValue
                  ,CHARINDEX('S',RowValue) AS LocationS
                  ,CHARINDEX('L',RowValue) AS LocationL
                  ,LEN(RowValue) AS Length
              FROM @YourTable
         ) dt

OUTPUT

S                              L                              RowValue
------------------------------ ------------------------------ --------------
NULL                           100000                         L100000
NULL                           50                             L50
NULL                           5                              L5
10                             NULL                           S10
15                             10                             S15L10
20                             NULL                           S20
90                             NULL                           S90
10                             NULL                           S10
10                             5                              S10L5
10                             40                             S10L40
10                             5                              S10L5

(11 row(s) affected)

if you have loads of data give this a try, it may be faster (has same output, basically removed the derived table and made everything use inline functions):

SELECT
    CASE
        WHEN CHARINDEX('S',RowValue)>0 AND CHARINDEX('L',RowValue)=0 THEN RIGHT(RowValue,LEN(RowValue)-1)
        WHEN CHARINDEX('S',RowValue)>0 THEN SUBSTRING(RowValue,2,CHARINDEX('L',RowValue)-2)
        ELSE NULL
    END AS S
    ,CASE
         WHEN CHARINDEX('S',RowValue)=0 AND CHARINDEX('L',RowValue)>0 THEN RIGHT(RowValue,LEN(RowValue)-1)
         WHEN CHARINDEX('S',RowValue)>0 AND CHARINDEX('L',RowValue)>0 THEN RIGHT(RowValue,LEN(RowValue)-CHARINDEX('L',RowValue))
         ELSE NULL
     END AS L
    ,RowValue
    FROM @YourTable
share|improve this answer
    
I just saw the last line of the question f no "S" or "L" is found, the default value is zero. to achieve that, just change the two CASE statement's ELSE clause from ELSE NULL to ELSE 0. Also the sample data from the question didn't contain a NULL row or a row with a junk value like 'ABC', my queries will return the CASE default for both. –  KM. Feb 24 '10 at 13:59
    
Excellent, your second suggestion worked "right out of the box". Thanks! :) –  Jakob Gade Feb 25 '10 at 2:07
SELECT 
SVal = CASE 
  WHEN PATINDEX('S%L%', TextVal) > 0 THEN REPLACE(LEFT(TextVal, CHARINDEX('L', TextVal) - 1), 'S', '')
  WHEN PATINDEX('S%', TextVal) > 0 THEN REPLACE(TextVal, 'S', '')
  ELSE '0'
END,
LVal = CASE
  WHEN PATINDEX('S%L%', TextVal) > 0 THEN REPLACE(RIGHT(TextVal, LEN(TextVal) - CHARINDEX('L', TextVal)), 'L', '')
  WHEN PATINDEX('L%', TextVal) > 0 THEN REPLACE(TextVal, 'L', '')
  ELSE '0'
END
FROM StringList 

Assumes S always comes before L. Also you might want to cast the results as numbers (they are strings now) depending on what you need for the output.

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I would suggest a clr-based function which would use a regex to extract the S or L value from the string. You could use it like this:

insert new_table (s_value, l_value)
  select getValue('S', original_value), getValue('L', original_value)
    from original_table
share|improve this answer

not tested but should be close assuming s always appears before l:

select
    case when charindex(data, 's') <> 0 then
        substr(data, charindex(data, 's'), charindex(data ,'l'))
    else 0 end
    , case when charindex(data, 'l') <> 0 then
        substr(data, charindex(data, 'l'))
    else 0 end
from some_table
share|improve this answer
    
Msg 195, Level 15, State 10, Line 3 'substr' is not a recognized built-in function name. and you get: Msg 174, Level 15, State 1, Line 6 The substring function requires 3 argument(s). after that. –  KM. Feb 24 '10 at 14:11

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