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While ssh'ing in my own machine, I am able to use Ctrl+P for command history in the terminal emulator. I wanted to know is it possible to make arrow keys function as well. I am ssh'ing through a program, not through the command ssh user@host

Why I am asking this, is because, before extracting individual characters from the byte array, I am printing it. When a character is pressed, the byte array shows a lot of numbers, but when I press an arrow key, it prints nothing. I have to make up arrow key to function as Ctrl+P works.

Please note that the SHELL value is /bin/bash. Also, I have experimented with these values of TERM variable : dumb, vt100, xterm, linux .For secure login, I am using Ganymed SSH library.

UPDATE: (with suggestions from tripleee)

A little snippet of keyboard processing logic is as follows:

for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
            {

                char c = (char) (data[i] & 0xff);
                System.out.print(c + ", ");
                if (c == 8) 
                {
                    if (posx < 0)
                        continue;
                    posx--;
                    continue;
                }

                if (c == '\r')
                {
                    posx = 0;
                    continue;
                }

                if (c == '\n')
                {
                    posy++;
                    if (posy >= y)
                    {
                        for (int k = 1; k < y; k++)
                            lines[k - 1] = lines[k];
                        posy--;
                        lines[y - 1] = new char[x];
                        for (int k = 0; k < x; k++)
                            lines[y - 1][k] = ' ';
                    }

                    continue;
                }
}//some more stuff and then the appending of characters with the previous ones

The input comes in this way:

byte[] buff = new byte[8192];

            try
            {
                while (true)
                {
                    int len = in.read(buff);
                    if (len == -1)
                        return;
                    addText(buff, len);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
            }

The Key Listener code is :

KeyAdapter kl = new KeyAdapter()
        {
            public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e)
            {
                System.out.println("EVENT IS: " + e.getKeyCode());
                int c = e.getKeyChar();

                try
                {
                    out.write(c);
                }
                catch (IOException e1)
                {
                }
                e.consume();
            }
        };

Thanks.

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If the remote application does its own keyboard processing, it might not be possible to make it accept arrow keys without code changes. –  tripleee Apr 24 '14 at 7:01
    
@tripleee: yes, in the program, one character is extracted at a time, and there are some conditions that process that character based on its ASCII value. I am trying to do the same with arrow key ASCII value but it seems not to even fire in the terminal. –  E1T1 Apr 24 '14 at 7:06
    
Arrow keys are not "ASCII". Depending on the terminal emulation, they are usually transmitted as some sort of escape or control code. For example, in my PuTTy window (I think VT220 emulation?), up arrow transmits Esc [ A. –  tripleee Apr 24 '14 at 7:09
    
@tripleee: yes my mistake, it transmits ^[[A when I ssh through the command ssh user@host. But in the terminal emulator, it feels like nothing is pressed as there is noting in the input byte array. So, I am even unable to get this escape sequence. –  E1T1 Apr 24 '14 at 7:12
1  
You need to explain in much more detail what "SSHing through a program" really means. –  tripleee Apr 24 '14 at 7:14

1 Answer 1

Try login using -t key, e.g. ssh -t user@host

From the man page:

Force pseudo-tty allocation. This can be used to execute arbitrary screen-based programs on a remote machine, which can be very useful, e.g. when implementing menu services.

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