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I'm trying to create a view where I want a column to be only true or false. However, it seems that no matter what I do, SQL Server (2008) believes my bit column can somehow be null.

I have a table called "Product" with the column "Status" which is INT, NULL. In a view, I want to return a row for each row in Product, with a BIT column set to true if the Product.Status column is equal to 3, otherwise the bit field should be false.

Example SQL

SELECT CAST( CASE ISNULL(Status, 0)  
               WHEN 3 THEN 1  
               ELSE 0  
             END AS bit) AS HasStatus  
FROM dbo.Product  

If I save this query as a view and look at the columns in Object Explorer, the column HasStatus is set to BIT, NULL. But it should never be NULL. Is there some magic SQL trick I can use to force this column to be NOT NULL.

Notice that, if I remove the CAST() around the CASE, the column is correctly set as NOT NULL, but then the column's type is set to INT, which is not what I want. I want it to be BIT. :-)

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@Gunder: +1, Welcome to StackOverflow. I have formatted your question, have a look at it to find out about formatting :) –  Peter Lang Feb 24 '10 at 14:52
    
Ahh, I needed one more line break before the code. Thanks. :-) –  René Feb 24 '10 at 15:23
1  
You're welcome :) Just select the code and press Ctrl+K, this will take care of line breaks and indentation. –  Peter Lang Feb 24 '10 at 20:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 56 down vote accepted

You can achieve what you want by re-arranging your query a bit. The trick is that the ISNULL has to be on the outside before SQL Server will understand that the resulting value can never be NULL.

SELECT ISNULL(CAST(
    CASE Status
        WHEN 3 THEN 1  
        ELSE 0  
    END AS bit), 0) AS HasStatus  
FROM dbo.Product  

One reason I actually find this useful is when using an ORM and you do not want the resulting value mapped to a nullable type. It can make things easier all around if your application sees the value as never possibly being null. Then you don't have to write code to handle null exceptions, etc.

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That works! - Thank you so much! - I'm a bit embarresed though, that I didn't try that first. :-) –  René Feb 24 '10 at 15:20
    
@Gunder: no worries, it's a bit arcane actually. This is also handy to use when creating a calculated bit column in a table and wanting the result to be not nullable. –  RedFilter Feb 24 '10 at 20:40
    
I needed something similar, and I found that COALESCE() did not work, you actually have to use ISNULL() –  EvilBob22 Dec 6 '13 at 20:18
    
@EvilBob22 That's odd, because both COALESCE and ISNULL can return NULL. Just a compiler quirk I guess. –  RedFilter Dec 6 '13 at 22:41
    
This, times a billion, for getting EntityFramework to infer a key when one normally wouldn't be inferred. –  Erik Jun 12 at 21:00

All you can do in a Select statement is control the data that the database engine sends to you as a client. The select statement has no effect on the structure of the underlying table. To modify the table structure you need to execute an Alter Table statement.

  1. First make sure that there are currently no nulls in that bit field in the table
  2. Then execute the following ddl statement: Alter Table dbo.Product Alter column status bit not null

If, otoh, all you are trying to do is control the output of the view, then what you are doing is sufficient. Your syntax will guarantee that the output of the HasStatus column in the views resultset will in fact never be null. It will always be either bit value = 1 or bit value = 0. Don't worry what the object explorer says...

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3  
I don't want to change the table column. The column is defined as an integer column, that allows null. This fits our spec. But I need a view that returns a column with a bit field, that cannot be null. It's not sufficient that I know it can't be null, the column has to be NOT NULL, so that it will map correctly in our ORM. –  René Feb 24 '10 at 15:16
DROP TABLE [dbo].[myTable1]
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[myTable1](
    [a] [int] NULL,
    [b] [varchar](50),
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO

INSERT INTO [dbo].[myTable1]([a],[b]) VALUES(1,'A');
INSERT INTO [dbo].[myTable1]([a],[b]) VALUES(2,'B');
INSERT INTO [dbo].[myTable1]([a],[b]) VALUES(3,'C');
INSERT INTO [dbo].[myTable1]([a],[b]) VALUES(4,'D');
INSERT INTO [dbo].[myTable1]([a],[b]) VALUES(5,NULL);


SELECT *, 
    (CASE b
        WHEN NULL THEN CAST(0 AS BIT)
        WHEN 'A' THEN CAST(1 AS BIT)
        WHEN 'B' THEN CAST(0 AS BIT)
        ELSE CAST(0 AS BIT)
    END) AS Status
FROM dbo.myTable1
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, that doesn't work. SQL Server says that the "Status" column is nullable. –  René Feb 26 '10 at 20:43

This is the code I use, it will make the ID column NOT NULL and all the other ones NULL. You have to cast the bit or varchar column, and compare the int column to NULL.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[aTestTable](
    [ID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [varcharCol] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
    [nullvarcharCol] [varchar](50) NULL,
    [bitCol] [bit] NOT NULL,
    [nullbitCol] [bit] NULL,
    [intCol] [int] NOT NULL,
    [nullintCol] [int] NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_aTestTable] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [ID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]


CREATE VIEW [dbo].[aTestView]
AS
SELECT  ID ,
        NULLIF(varcharCol , '') AS varcharCol ,
        NULLIF(CAST(varcharCol AS VARCHAR), null) AS varcharCol1, --better
        nullvarcharCol ,
        NULLIF(CAST(bitCol AS INT), null) AS bitCol ,
        nullbitCol ,
        NULLIF(CAST(intCol AS INT), NULL) AS intCol ,
        nullintCol
FROM    dbo.aTestTable


Sample Data:

ID  varcharCol  nullvarcharCol  bitCol  nullbitCol  intCol  nullintCol
1   1   1   1   1   1   1
2   0   0   0   0   0   0
3   0   NULL    0   NULL    0   NULL
4   a   a   1   1   2   2

hth

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