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I search for an efficient way to compute the cummulative sum (the tabulation) of all vector levels of a vector while using data.table.

The problem

A dataframe/data.table DT initially, consists of four variables, one is named experience. The goal is a vector which holds the cumulative counts of factor levels in experience conditional two other variables, id and cl. It is noteworthy that the factor experience has more factor levels than are present in the data set (this is a necessary property).

The data looks like

    id trial experience cl
 1:  1     1       000A  A
 2:  1     2       000A  A
 3:  1     3       000B  B
 4:  1     4       111A  A
 5:  1     5       001B  B
 6:  2     1       100B  B
 7:  2     2       111A  A
 8:  2     3       100B  B
 9:  2     4       010A  A
10:  2     5       011B  B

The factor levels of experience are of magnitude 16

levels(DT$experience)
#  [1] "000A" "001A" "010A" "011A" "100A" "101A" "110A" "111A"
#  [9] "000B" "001B" "010B" "011B" "100B" "101B" "110B" "111B"

What we want to compute is a cummulative count for experience conditional on id and cl. Consider the first three lines: For id=1 the first experience value is 000A, so a counter variable c000A = 1. The second experience value is also 000A, so the counter c000A = 2. But now the third experience value is 000B, and so the previous counter c000A stays 2, but another counter c000B = 1, which was 0 before that.

Following this logic, the result we want looks like:

    id trial experience cl c000A c001A c010A c011A c100A c101A c110A c111A c000B c001B c010B c011B c100B c101B c110B c111B
 1:  1     1       000A  A     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 2:  1     2       000A  A     2     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 3:  1     3       000B  B     2     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 4:  1     4       111A  A     2     0     0     0     0     0     0     1     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 5:  1     5       001B  B     2     0     0     0     0     0     0     1     1     1     0     0     0     0     0     0
 6:  2     1       100B  B     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0
 7:  2     2       111A  A     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0
 8:  2     3       100B  B     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     2     0     0     0
 9:  2     4       010A  A     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     2     0     0     0
10:  2     5       011B  B     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     1     2     0     0     0

Note: It is not important to me to assig the 16 entries c000A, ..., c111B to separate columns. It would be totally sufficient if the result was one vector with 16 entries ordered as c000A, c001A, ..., c110B, c111B which holds the cummulative counts.

Current code and speed of the calculation

The current code I use is the following two-step approach. It is neither beautiful nor elegant.

foo <- function(DT){
   # tabulate experience for each trial
   # store in an auxiliary variables <s000A, s001A, ..., s110B, s111B>
   DT[, paste(sep="","s",levels(DT$experience)) := as.list(table(experience)), by = c("id","cl","trial")]
   # sum each of the s____ variables by id
   DT[, "c000A" := cumsum(s000A), by = id] # this is clumsy
   DT[, "c001A" := cumsum(s001A), by = id]
   DT[, "c010A" := cumsum(s010A), by = id]
   DT[, "c011A" := cumsum(s011A), by = id]
   DT[, "c100A" := cumsum(s100A), by = id]
   DT[, "c101A" := cumsum(s101A), by = id]
   DT[, "c110A" := cumsum(s110A), by = id]
   DT[, "c111A" := cumsum(s111A), by = id]
   DT[, "c000B" := cumsum(s000B), by = id]
   DT[, "c001B" := cumsum(s001B), by = id]
   DT[, "c010B" := cumsum(s010B), by = id]
   DT[, "c011B" := cumsum(s011B), by = id]
   DT[, "c100B" := cumsum(s100B), by = id]
   DT[, "c101B" := cumsum(s101B), by = id]
   DT[, "c110B" := cumsum(s110B), by = id]
   DT[, "c111B" := cumsum(s111B), by = id]
}

This code takes, for a dataset with n = 1e+4 trials and 2 ids:

system.time(foo(DT))
# User  System verstrichen 
# 9.78    0.00       10.05

Code to create this example

library("data.table")
library("R.utils")
# Sample dataframe DF with n=1e+4
n <- 1e+4 #to test change this to n=5
DT <- data.table(id = rep(1:2,each=n), trial = rep(1:n,2), experience = c("000A","000A","000B","111A","001B","100B","111A","100B","010A","011B"), cl = c("A","A","B","A","B","B","A","B","A","B")) # experience needs to be a factor w more levels
DT$experience <- factor(DT$experience, levels = paste(sep="", intToBin(0:7), rep(c("A","B"),each=8)))
setkey(DT,id,trial,cl) #set the data.table keys

Who has a faster and more elegant solution?

Thanks! Jana


Update: Speed comparisons:

library("microbenchmark")
benchmk <- microbenchmark(
   DT2  <- foo2(DT),
   DT3a <- foo3a(DT),
   DT3b <- foo3b(DT),
   times=100L
   )
print(benchmk)

# with n=1e+4
#
# unit milliseconds
#              expr      min       lq   median        uq      max neval
# DT2   <- foo2(DT) 46.96745 52.17469 74.72479 120.93339 212.7912   100
# DT3a <- foo3a(DT) 25.21907 26.57921 28.84702  34.89401 121.3164   100
# DT3b <- foo3b(DT) 19.82076 20.80570 22.87369  30.83561 148.0520   100 

# with n=1e+5
#
# unit milliseconds
#              expr       min       lq   median       uq       max neval
#   DT2 <- foo2(DT) 386.93890 445.0184 481.4660 534.9619 1160.6151   100
# DT3a <- foo3a(DT) 144.45937 154.5672 170.6048 233.6362  494.8972   100
# DT3b <- foo3b(DT)  95.91988 100.5313 110.4060 125.1678  364.5651   100

foo2 corresponds to Eddi's code

foo2 <- function(DT){
    DT[, counter := 1:.N]
    DT[, dummy := 1]
    RE <- dcast.data.table(DT, counter+id ~ experience, value.var = 'dummy', fill = 0)[,lapply(.SD, cumsum), by = id, .SDcols = c(-1,-2)]
    RE[, setdiff(levels(DT$experience), unique(DT$experience)) := 0]
    setcolorder(RE, c("id",levels(DT$experience)))
}

foo3a correspond's to Arun's first code using the level

foo3a <- function(DT){
   ex = levels(DT$experience)
   DT[, c(ex) := 0L]
   tmp = DT[, list(list(.I)), by=experience]
   tmp[, experience := as.character(experience)] ## convert to char
   for(i in seq(nrow(tmp))) {
      set(DT, i=tmp$V1[[i]], j=tmp$experience[i], val=1L)
   }
   DT[, c(ex) := lapply(.SD, cumsum), by=id, .SDcols=ex]
}

foo3b corresponds to Arun's code using characters

foo3b <- function(DT){
   ex = levels(DT$experience)
   DT[, c(ex) := 0L]
   tmp = DT[, list(list(.I)), by=experience]
   tmp[, experience := as.character(experience)] ## convert to char
   for(i in seq(nrow(tmp))) {
      set(DT, i=tmp$V1[[i]], j=tmp$experience[i], val=1L)
   }
   ex = as.character(unique(DT$experience)) ## rewrite 'ex'
   DT[, c(ex) := lapply(.SD, cumsum), by=id, .SDcols=ex]
}
share|improve this question
    
Oh sorry, just edited it: library("R.utils") –  JBJ Apr 24 '14 at 14:54
    
Yes, it can. A sequence as you display it is possible. –  JBJ Apr 24 '14 at 15:14
    
Yes, exactly. The count is cumulative. –  JBJ Apr 24 '14 at 15:41
    
Indeed, wonderful. –  JBJ Apr 24 '14 at 21:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about this?

First create all the columns and initialise them to 0L.

ex = levels(DT$experience)
DT[, c(ex) := 0L]

Now, group by experience and get the row numbers corresponding to each experience in a list as follows:

tmp = DT[, list(list(.I)), by=experience]
tmp[, experience := as.character(experience)] ## convert to char

Then, you can loop thro' each column and use set with the corresponding rows (from the column V1) and the columns (from column experience) from tmp to assign 1 to the corresponding columns in DT as follows:

for(i in seq(nrow(tmp))) {
    set(DT, i=tmp$V1[[i]], j=tmp$experience[i], val=1L)
}

Finally a cumsum on each column by id:

DT[, c(ex) := lapply(.SD, cumsum), by=id, .SDcols=ex]

Altogether it took 0.013 seconds (the dcast.data.table solution, which is nice as well, took 0.027 seconds).


You might be able to save a bit more time if you use as.character(unique(DT$experience)) instead of ex in the last line.. as some columns have all 0's and you don't have to cumsum them. That is:

ex = as.character(unique(DT$experience)) ## rewrite 'ex'
DT[, c(ex) := lapply(.SD, cumsum), by=id, .SDcols=ex]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - this is way faster that dcast for larger data –  eddi Apr 24 '14 at 16:50
    
Wonderful. Thanks a lot. I will add some more benchmarks above. –  JBJ Apr 24 '14 at 16:51
    
That's the solution. Do you have an intuition why the code using a for-loop is the fastest when most recommendations regarding speed go in the direction to avoid loops? –  JBJ Apr 24 '14 at 21:22
    
@JBJ, I'd guess that's the case if you loop over millions of entries. Then it'd be performant if you move the for-loop to C. Here it's just looping a few times. If we implement set to be able to do the looping in C and avoid the for-loop here, I'd think that it'd be faster (not here though as it's really a very few columns). –  Arun Apr 25 '14 at 23:55
    
Also, you can skip tmp and for-loop altogether and do: DT[, set(DT, i=.I, j=as.character(experience), value=1L), by=experience]. –  Arun Apr 25 '14 at 23:59

Something like this perhaps:

# add some extra variables
DT[, counter := 1:.N]
DT[, dummy := 1]

dcast.data.table(DT, counter+id ~ experience, value.var = 'dummy', fill = 0)[,
  lapply(.SD, cumsum), by = id, .SDcols = c(-1,-2)]
#       id 000A 010A 111A 000B 001B 011B 100B
#    1:  1    1    0    0    0    0    0    0
#    2:  1    2    0    0    0    0    0    0
#    3:  1    2    0    0    1    0    0    0
#    4:  1    2    0    1    1    0    0    0
#    5:  1    2    0    1    1    1    0    0
#   ---                                      
#19996:  2 2000  999 1999 1000 1000  999 1999
#19997:  2 2000  999 2000 1000 1000  999 1999
#19998:  2 2000  999 2000 1000 1000  999 2000
#19999:  2 2000 1000 2000 1000 1000  999 2000
#20000:  2 2000 1000 2000 1000 1000 1000 2000

And you can cbind it back if you like.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. On the one hand, the speed is much faster than my solution (wow!) (User System verstrichen | 0.05 0.00 0.05). But on the other hand, note, that the result needs to display the count for all factor levels. This result displays the counts of the present, nonzero factor levels. –  JBJ Apr 24 '14 at 15:36
    
@JBJ just add the rest as 0 columns by hand, e.g.: DT.res[, setdiff(levels(DT$experience), unique(DT$experience)) := 0], where DT.res is the final result above –  eddi Apr 24 '14 at 15:46
    
Yes, nice! And, as I need the columns in the order of the factor experience, I will reorder them using setcolorder. Let me add the speed comparison to the results and see if someone gets sth. faster. –  JBJ Apr 24 '14 at 15:55

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