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I think I have implemented the Double-checked locking pattern but not sure if it safe or it works as intended. Any other logic to implement the same would be really helpful.

public class OnProperties {

    private static String dfltPropertyFile = "on.properties";
    private static long refreshSecs = 120L;
    private static Properties props;
    private static long lastReadTimestamp = 0;


    public static String getProperty(String propertyName, String dfltValue) {
        long currentTimestamp = System.currentTimeMillis() / 1000L;

        if (props == null
                || (refreshSecs > 0 && (currentTimestamp - lastReadTimestamp) > refreshSecs)) {
            synchronized (props) {
                if (props == null
                        || (refreshSecs > 0 && (currentTimestamp - lastReadTimestamp) > refreshSecs)) {
                    lastReadTimestamp = currentTimestamp;
                    try {
                        loadProperties(dfltPropertyFile);
                        refreshSecs = getProperty("on.properties.refresh", 120L);
                        if (refreshSecs < 0L) {
                            refreshSecs = 0L;
                        }
                    } catch (Exception e) {
                        refreshSecs = 600L;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        if (props == null) {
            return dfltValue;
        }

        String propertyValue = props.getProperty(propertyName, dfltValue);

        return propertyValue;
    }

    public static boolean getProperty(String propertyName, boolean dfltValue) {
        boolean value = dfltValue;

        String strValue = getProperty(propertyName, (String) null);
        if (strValue != null) {
            try {
                value = Boolean.parseBoolean(strValue);
            } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
                // just keep the default
            }

        }
        return value;
    }

    private static void loadProperties(String p_propertiesFile)
            throws java.io.IOException, java.io.FileNotFoundException {
        InputStream fileStream = new FileInputStream(p_propertiesFile);
        props = new Properties();
        props.load(fileStream);
        fileStream.close();
    }
}

Generally multiple threads running often access the "getProperty" method as follows:

extDebug = OnProperties.getProperty("on.extdebug", false); 
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5  
you can't synchronize on null –  hoaz Apr 24 '14 at 15:37
3  
You can't synchronize on a field you change, otherwise each thread could be locking on a different object making it meaning less. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 24 '14 at 15:55
1  
Are you sure you need the double checked locking? It's hard to implement correctly, and you may get the same gain using other techniques. –  Joachim Isaksson Apr 24 '14 at 16:49
1  
@MarshallTigerus Depends on how you define "thread safe." Java memory model is such that it's possible to get stale information with unsynchronized reads to mutable data. –  Chuck Batson Apr 24 '14 at 17:25
1  
@Joachim Isaksson is it really required to define these variables volatile? If i understand correct, in java memory model, synchronized block is also memory barrier. In this case both the condition check and mutation happens inside the synchronized block, correct? –  Prem Apr 24 '14 at 19:43

5 Answers 5

It is not safe as you have multiple variables which are read in a way which is not thread safe (i.e. access is not synchronized and they are not volatile).

It appears the workflow is mostly reads with a few writes. I would suggest using a ReentrantReadWriteLock to synchronize access.

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To have this working correctly with double-checked locking you must do two things:

  • private static Properties props must be declared volatile;
  • as already mentioned, synchronised(props) won't work in case props are null - you need to declare a special lock object field:

.

private static final Object propsLockObject = new Object();
...
synchronized(propsLockObject) { 
...

P.S. The lastReadTimestamp won't work also unless declared volatile. Though this is not about double-checked locking anymore.

share|improve this answer
1  
props being declared volatile solves your double checked locking issue, but it does not address the fact that props is not null before it is populated. So a concurrent call could find props not null and make a call to getProperty either before or concurrent to props.load(filestream). This could lead to the returning of a null value where a property value truly exists. –  Brett Okken Apr 24 '14 at 17:06
    
Indeed, a correction is needed to assign props to newly created instance of Properties after they've been populated. Simple change though. –  mvmn May 2 '14 at 12:10
  1. To reload the properties, you don't need to re-initialize the props variable. Initialize the properties during the declaration statement itself will do. This will solve the problem of synchronizing with null.
  2. Remove the initialization code in the loadProperties block.
  3. remove the prop==null check outside and inside the synchronized block.
  4. Once that is done, your code will work exactly the way you want.

    public class OnProperties {

    private static String dfltPropertyFile = "on.properties"; 
    private static long refreshSecs = 120L; 
    private static Properties props = new Properties();
    private static long lastReadTimestamp = 0;
    public static String getProperty(String propertyName, String dfltValue) { 
    
    long currentTimestamp = System.currentTimeMillis() / 1000L;
    
      if (refreshSecs > 0 && (currentTimestamp - lastReadTimestamp) > refreshSecs) {
          synchronized (props) {
              if (refreshSecs > 0 && (currentTimestamp - lastReadTimestamp) > refreshSecs) {
                  lastReadTimestamp = currentTimestamp;
                  try {
                      loadProperties(dfltPropertyFile);
                      refreshSecs = getProperty("on.properties.refresh", 120L);
                      if (refreshSecs < 0L) {
                          refreshSecs = 0L;
                      }
                  } catch (Exception e) {
                      refreshSecs = 600L;
                  }
              }
          }
      }
    
      String propertyValue = props.getProperty(propertyName, dfltValue);
    
      return propertyValue;
    
    }
    
    public static boolean getProperty(String propertyName, boolean dfltValue) { boolean value = dfltValue;
    
      String strValue = getProperty(propertyName, (String) null);
      if (strValue != null) {
          try {
              value = Boolean.parseBoolean(strValue);
          } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
              // just keep the default
          }
    
      }
      return value;
    
    }
    
    private static void loadProperties(String p_propertiesFile) throws java.io.IOException, java.io.FileNotFoundException { InputStream fileStream = new FileInputStream(p_propertiesFile); props.load(fileStream); fileStream.close(); } }
    
share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't lock on a mutable field. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 24 '14 at 15:56
    
@Peter Lawrey I agree, in this case, synchronize with OnProperties.class should solve the problem,right? –  Prem Apr 24 '14 at 16:33
1  
@Prem It should work, although I usually prefer locking on a private immutable field, just so that no one can accidentally lock on the same (public) class and cause a deadlock. –  Joachim Isaksson Apr 24 '14 at 16:40
    
@Joachim Isaksson, thanks for the pointer. I have a question regarding Peter Lawrey's comment. In the example i have written, the props is is immutable field inside OnProperties(Even I can make the prop field final). But the values changing inside the props field, right? is it a problem? It is similar to a synchronizing a mutator method inside Properties class, right? –  Prem Apr 24 '14 at 16:51
    
Afaik (although I've not done any advanced threading in Java for a bit), as long as the reference does not change (which it does not in your example), the contents can change at will and locking will still work fine. The reason to use an explicit - otherwise useless - locking object is more to avoid passing a locked object to some method that does the same thing, locks on a convenient object which may be the one you just passed in. –  Joachim Isaksson Apr 24 '14 at 17:29

Please accept that the double-checked locking idiom is broken and does not work (i.e. does not synchronize properly). Even if you make it work using volatile (at the right place), it is far too complex for what you get.

So my suggestion: Simply synchronize everything. Then try and measure. If you find out that OnProperties is the bottleneck, consider more powerful/clever synchronization techniques and come back if necessary:

public class OnProperties {
    /* some private fields here */

    public static synchronized String getProperty(String propertyName, String dfltValue) {
        reloadPropertiesIfNecessary();

        return props.getProperty(propertyName, dfltValue);
    }

    /* other public methods using getProperty come here */

    private static void reloadPropertiesIfNecessary() {
        // check timestamp etc.
        if (/* check timestamp etc. */) {
            loadProperties(dfltPropertyFile);
            // update timestamp etc.
        }
    }

    private static void loadProperties(String filename) throws IOException {
        try (InputStream stream = new FileInputStream(filename)) {
            props = new Properties();
            props.load(fileStream);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for simplicity first, complexity only when measurably necessary. –  Chuck Batson Apr 24 '14 at 17:26
    
Just out of curiosity, what will be the difference if we make reloadPropertiesIfNecessary method synchronized instead of getProperty method? –  Prem Apr 24 '14 at 19:50
    
@Prem In that case, the read-access (props.getProperty(...)) will not be synchronized which violates the core rule: EVERY access to shared state MUST be synchronized properly! (What could happen is a race condition when one thread is reloading the properties while another accesses them concurrently) –  isnot2bad Apr 25 '14 at 6:25
    
@isnot2bad got it. Thanks for clarifying this. –  Prem Apr 25 '14 at 16:46

Atomic values guarantee to always return the complete latest value to all threads. This prevents a number of multi-threading issues in this case. A bit of synchronization is still required, but it can be limited to a minimum. See my implementation below:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.util.Properties;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicReference;

public class OnProperties {


private static int refreshIntervalDefaultSecs;
private static int refreshIntervalOnErrorSecs;

static {
    setRefreshInterval(120);
}

private static final AtomicReference<Properties> propsRef = new AtomicReference<Properties>(new Properties());
private static final AtomicLong nextPropsLoad = new AtomicLong(0L);
private static final Object loadLock = new Object();

private static String dfltPropertyFile  = "on.properties";

public static String getProperty(String key, String defaultValue) {

    String value = getProperty(key);
    if (value == null) {
        value = defaultValue;
    }
    return value;
}

private static String getProperty(String key) {

    reloadWhenNeeded();
    return propsRef.get().getProperty(key);
}

private static void reloadWhenNeeded() {

    long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
    if (now > nextPropsLoad.get()) {
        boolean reload = false;
        synchronized(loadLock) {
            if (now > nextPropsLoad.get()) {
                // need loadLock because there is time between previous get()
                // and next set()
                updateNextPropsLoad(now, refreshIntervalDefaultSecs);
                reload = true;
            }
        }
        if (reload) {
            reloadProps(now);
        }
    }
}

private static void updateNextPropsLoad(long now, int nextRefreshSecs) {
    nextPropsLoad.set(now + nextRefreshSecs * 1000);
}

private static void reloadProps(long now) {

    Properties p = new Properties();
    FileInputStream in = null;

    System.out.println("Reloading from " + new File(dfltPropertyFile).getAbsolutePath());

    try { 
        p.load(in = new FileInputStream(new File(dfltPropertyFile)));
        propsRef.set(p);
        setRefreshInterval(getProperty("on.properties.refresh", 120));
        updateNextPropsLoad(now, refreshIntervalDefaultSecs);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        updateNextPropsLoad(now, refreshIntervalOnErrorSecs);
    } finally {
        try { if (in != null) in.close(); } catch (Exception e) {
            updateNextPropsLoad(now, refreshIntervalOnErrorSecs);
        }
    }
}

private static void setRefreshInterval(int refreshSecs) {

    if (refreshSecs < 1) {
        refreshSecs = 120;
    }
    refreshIntervalDefaultSecs = refreshSecs;
    refreshIntervalOnErrorSecs = 5 * refreshSecs;
}

public static boolean getProperty(String key, boolean defaultValue) {

    boolean value = defaultValue;
    String svalue = getProperty(key);
    if (svalue != null) {
        try {
            value = Boolean.valueOf(svalue);
        } catch (Exception ignored) {}
    }
    return value;
}

public static int getProperty(String key, int defaultValue) {

    int value = defaultValue;
    String svalue = getProperty(key);
    if (svalue != null) {
        try {
            value = Integer.valueOf(svalue);
        } catch (Exception ignored) {}
    }
    return value;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {

    System.out.println("Refresh value from file: " + getProperty("on.properties.refresh", 120));
    System.out.println("No reload " + getProperty("does.not.exist", true));
    System.out.println("Next reload after " + ((nextPropsLoad.get() - System.currentTimeMillis()) / 1000) + " seconds.");
}

}

One drawback of the implementation is that one thread will get slowed down when it is selected to reload the properties from file. A better approach would be to create a 'watchdog' thread/scheduled task that checks every (for example) five seconds if the properties-file has a changed modification date and then trigger a reload (in which case the AtomicReference for the Properties still comes in handy).
Also keep in mind that there is a logical threading issue: if property values are interrelated (i.e. one value is only correct if another value is also updated), a reload could present a thread with old and new values that should not be mixed. The only way around that is to keep a reference to one set of properties in methods that use the interrelated values of the properties (and a class like this with static methods and variables is not handy in such a situation).

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