Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
$i=1;
while($i<3) {
    print << "EOT";
    def px$i = new E(user) 
    if (!px$i.hasErrors()) {
            println "${px$i.name} / ${px$i.empr.to} OK"
    }

EOT

    $i++;
}

produces the error:

Can't call method "px" without a package or object reference at borrar.pl line 3.

How can I "escape" the if ?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I don't know what that is, but it sure isn't Perl. –  friedo Feb 24 '10 at 16:13
    
The code inside the print/EOT sure isn't, but that's not the point, I just need what's inside the print/EOT to be written to stdout; in fact if I remove the "if" block, it runs perfectly. –  xain Feb 24 '10 at 16:17
    
Doh -- I missed the fact that the stuff was in a big heredoc. –  friedo Feb 24 '10 at 16:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's kind of hard to tell what this code is supposed to accomplish, but maybe you want the outer dollar signs in the println statement to be preserved in the final output?

println "\${px$i.name} / \${px$i.empr.to} OK"

With that change, the error-free output I see is:

def px1 = new E(user) 
if (!px1.hasErrors()) {
        println "${px1.name} / ${px1.empr.to} OK"
}

def px2 = new E(user) 
if (!px2.hasErrors()) {
        println "${px2.name} / ${px2.empr.to} OK"
}
share|improve this answer
    
The code is part of a bigger script that loads a cvs and creates groovy classes from its data. The question is Why the perl compiler is trying to compile the block inside the print/EOT and how to tell it not to.(BTW, thanks for the recommendation but it didn't work) –  xain Feb 24 '10 at 16:24
    
@xain: What do you mean exactly by "it didn't work"? Show the exact output you expect to get. How does it differ from Sean's output? –  toolic Feb 24 '10 at 16:29
    
Sean, my mistake. It worked just fine. Thanks! –  xain Feb 24 '10 at 16:35

The command line option -MO=Deparse shows you how Perl has interpreted your code after simplifying it (e.g. converting heredocs to qq{} blocks). e.g.

$ perl -MO=Deparse test.pl
$i = 1;
while ($i < 3) {
    print qq[    def px$i = new E(user) \n    if (!px$i.hasErrors()) {\n            println "${$i->px . 'name';} / ${$i->px . 'empr' . 'to';} OK"\n    }\n\n];
    ++$i;
}

The relevant part is:

println "${$i->px . 'name';} / ${$i->px . 'empr' . 'to';}

Perl has converted ${px$i.name} to ${$i->px . 'name'} !

In perl, ${...} means to evaluate whatever is inside the block, and treat it as a symbolic reference (i.e. a variable name) or a scalar reference, then dereference it to turn it back into a scalar. So Perl tries to execute whatever is inside those blocks, treating their contents as Perl code. This is because your heredoc, "EOT" is like a double-quoted string, and interpolates dollar signs.

Solution is: escape your dollar signs ($ -> \$) or use single quotes and concatenation rather than heredocs.

share|improve this answer

This should fix the problem.

println "${"px$i.name"} / ${"px$i.empr.to"} OK"
println "px$i.name" / px$i.empr.to OK"
share|improve this answer

As you have seen, the $px part of the string is getting evaluated. You simply need to escape it:

$i=1;
while($i<3) {
    print << "EOT";
    def px$i = new E(user) 
    if (!px$i.hasErrors()) {
            println "\${px$i.name} / \${px$i.empr.to} OK"
    }

EOT

    $i++;
}

Read more about string escaping at perldoc perlop under "Gory details of parsing quoted constructs".

share|improve this answer
my $format = << 'EOT';
def px%d = new E(user)
    if (!px%d.hasErrors()) {
            println "${px%d.name} / ${px%d.empr.to} OK"
    }
EOT

for my $i ( 1 .. 3 ) {
    printf $format, ($i) x 4;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
(+1) there are multiple kinds of heredocs single-quotes are non-interpolated. another type is backticks, e.g. EOT which would execute the string via shell. –  harschware Feb 24 '10 at 23:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.