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Given two Classes

class A
  def method_a ()
    method_b()
  end

  def method_b ()
    puts "Comes from A"
  end
end

and B inheriting from A

class B < A
  def method_a ()
    super()
  end

  def method_b ()
    puts "Comes from B"
  end
end

When i call B.method_a the Outcome would be: Comes from B. Is there a possibility to tell A to call its method_b instead of my overwritten one? (So that the result would be Comes from A)

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Why did you override method_b when you don't plan to use it? What's your use-case? –  Kirti Thorat Apr 24 at 17:48
1  
Please note that although it isn't applicable in this particular case, there is an important distinction in the parser between super and super(): without the parentheses, super reuses all the arguments passed to method_a, whereas with the parentheses, super() calls the parent method with no arguments at all. –  Jesse Sielaff Apr 24 at 17:53
    
Maybe this could work? B.new.superclass.method_b –  Felipe Almeida Apr 24 at 18:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There isn't an equivalent of C++'s A::method_a

You could however do

class A
  def method_a
    A.instance_method(:method_b).bind(self).call
  end

  def method_b
    puts "Comes from A"
  end
end

class B < A
  def method_a
    super
  end

  def method_b
    puts "Comes from B"
  end
end

What is happening here in method_a is that we're retrieving A's implementation of method_b and calling it directly.

This does somewhat fly in the face of using inheritance in the first place though

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Thanks, thats what i was searching for. Nonetheless I now see how its against the Inheritance Principle and I'm glad that i don't need to use this anymore because i found a flaw in my design –  chrsi May 18 at 13:35

I don't think you can do it straight forward, without putting a hack, but wouldn't it defeat the purpose of inheritance and template pattern, as there can be a C class as well inheriting from A, and you may want to call method_b function of class C only, as it has been over-written and required.

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What you ask is not supported, since it defeats the point of inheritance. What you can do, is split the implementation into two methods - one that does As implementation of method_b, which is not overridden, and one that delegates to that implementation, which may be overridden:

class A
  def method_a
    dont_override_me
  end

  def method_b
    dont_override_me
  end

  private
  def dont_override_me
    puts "Comes from A"
  end
end

class B < A
  def method_a 
    super
  end

  def method_b
    puts "Comes from B"
  end
end
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class A
  def method_a; comes_from_A end
  def method_b; puts "Comes from A" end
  alias comes_from_A method_b
end

class B < A
  def method_a; super end
  def method_b; puts "Comes from B" end
end
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You could modify the child class as follows:

class B < A
  def method_a
    self.class.send(:remove_method, :method_b)
    super()
    self.class.send(:alias_method, :method_b, :method_b_alias)
  end

  def method_b
    puts "Comes from B"
  end

  alias_method :method_b_alias, :method_b
end

b = B.new

b.method_b
  # Comes from B
b.method_a
  # Comes from A
b.method_b
  # Comes from B

The alias :method_b_alias is created when the child class is created. Whenever method_a is called on an instance of of B, B's method method_b is removed before super is invoked, so A's method_a will not find it and use its own method_a instead (since the receiver of A's method_a (self) is the instance of B.) After super returns, alias_method is used to once again make B's method_a available to instances of B.

We need to use Module#remove_method rather than Module#undef_method. If the latter were used, A's method_a would give up looking for method_b after finding that B did not have that method.

If you prefer, you could change two lines to use the keyword alias rather than alias_method:

self.class.send(:alias :method_b :method_b_alias)
alias :method_b_alias :method_b
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