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I know this seems so trivial, but having only ever worked in declarative/imperative languages, I find myself having issues with this problem.

I have a checker-board (essentially an 8x8 list/array of states), and I need to be able to grab the (x y)th element of the board.

I figure given rest-of-board as board, if I can (rest rest-of-board) y-1 times, then return (first rest-of-board), I will have the row. Then if I (rest row) x-1 times, then return (first row), I will have the right element. Then I return with (result )?

     #lang scheme
     (define new-board '((P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF)
                (OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF P2)
                (P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF)
                (OFF BLANK OFF BLANK OFF BLANK OFF BLANK)
                (BLANK OFF BLANK OFF BLANK OFF BLANK OFF)
                (OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1)
                (P1 OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF)
                (OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1)))
     (define (get-state board x y))
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I'd like to thank you for a very practical solution. I will probably use elements from both answers for my solution. I suppose I should look into how vector-ref / vector-set work to determine how I would have implemented it via lists. –  RazerSwift Apr 24 at 19:13
    
You can always use list-ref instead of vector-ref and work with lists (or lists of lists), except that 1) vector-ref is faster and 2) vectors are way easier to update, especially in Racket. –  uselpa Apr 24 at 19:17
    
Wonderful, that makes sense. Is there a place on the website or in the installation where I can see how functions are implemented? –  RazerSwift Apr 24 at 19:27
    
The definitions of list-ref and vector-ref? Generally in the IDE (Dr Racket) you can right-click on the word and select open defining file from the context menu but that doesn't seem to work for these 2 procedures. –  uselpa Apr 24 at 20:44
    
Some of the vector procedures are defined in [installdir]/collects/racket/vector.rkt. –  uselpa Apr 24 at 20:55
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe a vector of vectors would be a better representation here:

(define new-board 
  (list->vector 
   (map list->vector 
        '((P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF)
          (OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF P2)
          (P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF P2 OFF)
          (OFF BLANK OFF BLANK OFF BLANK OFF BLANK)
          (BLANK OFF BLANK OFF BLANK OFF BLANK OFF)
          (OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1)
          (P1 OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF)
          (OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1 OFF P1)))))

(define (get-state board x y)
  (vector-ref (vector-ref board x) y))

(define (set-state! board x y val)
  (vector-set! (vector-ref board x) y val))

then

> (get-state new-board 0 1)
OFF
> (get-state new-board 1 1)
P2

> (set-state! new-board 1 1 'hi)
> (get-state new-board 1 1)
'hi
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Create an abstraction for this:

(define (make-board)
  (make-vector 64 'blank))

(define (board-ref board x y)
  (vector-ref board (+ (* y 8) x)))

(define (board-set! board x y new)
  (vector-set! board (+ (* y 8) x) new))

Go from there.

(define (board-fill board list-of-64-values) ...)    ;; for example
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1  
I'd suggest factoring out the (+ (* y 8) x) into a board-index function. –  Chris Jester-Young Apr 24 at 19:33
1  
Thank you for your answer :) Accessing 2-D vector in such a way is valuable information. –  RazerSwift Apr 24 at 20:39
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