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In order to install the Informix JDBC driver, I need to be running Sun's jdk. That comes directly from IBM/Informix support. In other words, when I enter java -version I need to see Sun's java not this:

[ics@gentest jvm]$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_24"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.11.11.90) (rhel-1.62.1.11.11.90.el6_4-i386)
OpenJDK Server VM (build 20.0-b12, mixed mode)

I'm just not quite sure what steps I need to take to point my environment to Sun's java. The system is CentOS release 6.4 (Final). This is the contents of /usr/lib/jvm

The jdk1.8.0_05 and symlink jdk symlink to jdk1.8.0_05 are from some instructions I found on the Internet. I'm still seeing the OpenSDK Java however, when I use java -version.

lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   26 Jul 19  2013 java -> /etc/alternatives/java_sdk
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   32 Jul 19  2013 java-1.6.0 -> /etc/alternatives/java_sdk_1.6.0
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   26 Jul 19  2013 java-1.6.0-openjdk -> java-1.6.0-openjdk-1.6.0.0
drwxr-xr-x. 7 root root 4096 Jul  3  2013 java-1.6.0-openjdk-1.6.0.0
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   34 Jul 19  2013 java-openjdk -> /etc/alternatives/java_sdk_openjdk
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   24 Apr 24 17:02 jdk -> /usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.8.0_05
drwxr-xr-x  8 uucp  143 4096 Mar 18 04:03 jdk1.8.0_05
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   21 Jul 19  2013 jre -> /etc/alternatives/jre
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   27 Jul 19  2013 jre-1.6.0 -> /etc/alternatives/jre_1.6.0
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   30 Jul 19  2013 jre-1.6.0-openjdk -> java-1.6.0-openjdk-1.6.0.0/jre
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root   29 Jul 19  2013 jre-openjdk -> /etc/alternatives/jre_openjdk
[

The reason for all this is when I try to install the Informix JDBC driver I get this error, documented here in SO and elsewhere.

java -cp /home/ics/sandbox/jdbc/setup.jar run -console
The wizard cannot continue because of the following error: could not load wizard specified in /wizard.inf (104)
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closed as off-topic by Brian Roach, Bohemian Apr 25 at 9:55

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've oftenly have the same problem, the easiest way to deal with many versions of Java in the same machine is to modify the environment variables JAVA_HOME and PATH for each process that needs a different version of java.

Have a "source script" like this:

export JAVA_HOME=/opt/jdk1.5
export PATH=$JAVA_HOME/bin:$PATH

and call it, say, java_1_5.sh. It doesn't matter if there is already another binary java in the PATH, because $JAVA_HOME/bin comes first in the PATH, the process will "see" your version of java first.

Now, whenever you need to run java 1.5 (or the java version/vendor/whatever you want):

  • if run java manually from the console:

    $ . ./java_1_5.sh

    yes, the dot at the beggining is important, it tells the shel to take the script as a source

  • if you need to run, say, tomcat: then modify catalina.sh an put . path_to/java_1_5.sh in the beggining of the script

... and so on. Maybe there are more "canonical" ways to have many installations of java in the same machine (like the jdks under the directory /usr/lib/jvm, having a soft link pointing to the latest, tweaking the /etc/alternatives system, etc...) but, believe me, the way I'm telling you is the easiest I could find so far.

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I still have the problem with IBM/Informix, but your solution is great. I'm pointing to the Sun JDK I downloaded. tnx –  octopusgrabbus Apr 24 at 22:34

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