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I am testing the code for Write yourself a Scheme in 48 hours with GHC-7.8.2, which gives me an error about ambiguity that I don't recall encountering in previous versions of GHC. The excerpt is below, with the problem line marked:

data LispVal = Atom String
             | List [LispVal]
             | DottedList [LispVal] LispVal
             | Number Integer
             | String String
             | Bool Bool
unpackNum :: LispVal -> Integer
unpackNum (Number n) = n
unpackNum (String n) = let parsed = reads n in  --problem line 
                          if null parsed 
                            then 0
                            else fst $ parsed !! 0
unpackNum (List [n]) = unpackNum n
unpackNum _ = 0

, and the error says:

No instance for (Read a0) arising from a use of ¡®parsed¡¯
The type variable ¡®a0¡¯ is ambiguous
Note: there are several potential instances:
  instance Read a => Read (Control.Applicative.ZipList a)
    -- Defined in ¡®Control.Applicative¡¯
  instance Read () -- Defined in ¡®GHC.Read¡¯
  instance (Read a, Read b) => Read (a, b) -- Defined in ¡®GHC.Read¡¯
  ...plus 26 others

If I change the problem line to

unpackNum (String n) = let parsed = reads n ::[(Integer,String)] in 

then everything works fine.

I don't see why GHC failed to infer the type for ReadS from the signature of unpackNum. Can someone please explain what triggered the error?

(

-- EDIT --

Just some follow-up. From what I understand, the function type unpackNum :: LispVal -> Integer and the fact that fst $ parsed !! 0 is a return value of it tells that parsed has type [(Integer,b)], and from type ReadS a = String -> [(a,String)], the parsed should be [(a, String)]. Shouldn't these two types unify to [(Integer, String)] and fix the type for parsed?

Can someone please explain why NoMonomorphismRestriction would break the above reasoning?

-- EDIT2 --

From the answers, I can understand how NoMonomorphismRestriction could cause the issue here. Still, what I don't understand is the fact that how this "two type for the same expression" behavior consistent with laziness in Haskell. In the example parsed or reads n is the same expression in one block and should be evaluated only once. How can it have type a the first time of evaluation and Integer the second time?

)

Thanks,

share|improve this question
2  
The code just compiles for me with ghc-7.8.2 ... – kosmikus Apr 24 '14 at 22:38
    
@kosmikus: Also on ghc-7.8.2 and I see the same error as the OP. – acomar Apr 24 '14 at 23:03
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The types should unify but don't in the presence of the NoMonomorphismRestriction (as noted in the comments by @FedorGogolev and @kosmikus). However, the following more idiomatic approach removes the need for the type annotation in any case:

data LispVal = Atom String
             | List [LispVal]
             | DottedList [LispVal] LispVal
             | Number Integer
             | String String
             | Bool Bool
unpackNum :: LispVal -> Integer
unpackNum (Number n) = n
unpackNum (String n) = case reads n of
                           [] -> 0
                           ((x, _):xs) -> x
unpackNum (List [n]) = unpackNum n
unpackNum _ = 0

The Difference Between Case and Null

It boils down to the fact that null is a function whereas case is straight syntax.

null :: [a] -> Bool

So with -XNoMonomorphismRestriction enabled, this is left as polymorphic as possible when the argument is supplied. The function doesn't restrict the argument type in any way, and so the compiler is unable to determine the return type of reads, causing the error. At the site of the function call, the type is ambiguous. In the case of the case statement, the compiler has the entire expression to work with, and so has the pattern matches to refine the return type of reads.

share|improve this answer
    
That was a fast downvote... care to share why? I'm happy to improve the answer if it's incorrect or needs improvement. – acomar Apr 24 '14 at 22:31
1  
Why was this downvoted without comment? I can't see a problem with the answer. +1 to balance ;) – kosmikus Apr 24 '14 at 22:32
5  
Thanks for the input. I don't know why the downvote. I do have a question though. (Correct me if I am wrong) type ReadS a = String -> [(a,String)], so the snd of the pair is known to be String, isn't it? – tinlyx Apr 24 '14 at 22:34
1  
See NoMonomorphismRestriction. – Fedor Gogolev Apr 24 '14 at 23:09
3  
Ok, so the real answer to the question is: If the monomorphism restriction is disabled, the definition of parsed gets a polymorphic type, namely Read a => [(a, String)], and then the first use in null parsed doesn't have sufficient contextual information to resolve what a is. (Note what just happened: this actually is an example of where the monomorphism restriction is somewhat desirable. These situations are rare enough, but they happen ...) – kosmikus Apr 24 '14 at 23:14

This is triggered if NoMonomorphismRestriction is active; which, btw, is now the case by default in GHCi since 7.8 (see release notes, Section 1.5.2.3).

If the monomorphism restriction is disabled, the definition of parsed gets a polymorphic type, namely

parsed :: Read a => [(a, String)]

and then the first use in null parsed doesn't have sufficient contextual information to resolve what a is.

This happens to be one of the few cases where the monomorphism restriction actually does some good. Because with the polymorphic type, even if both use sites had sufficient type information to resolve the class constraint, the actual parsing would happen twice.

The best solution is still to use pattern matching as suggested in acomar's answer.

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Thanks a lot for your answer. Could you elaborate on why "null parsed doesn't have sufficient contextual information"? Please see my update in the question. – tinlyx Apr 25 '14 at 0:17
    
We have null :: [b] -> Bool, so null parsed :: Read a => Bool, i.e., it's a Bool once we make a choice for a. But there's no information available about what a is. As parsed is polymorphic, each use of parsed is allowed to pick a different type for a, so looking at the other use site doesn't help either. With the monomorphism restriction in place, this is exactly what happens: parsed is restricted to be monomorphic, so a choice for a must be found that works for all uses, and the fst (parsed !! 0) combo together with the Integer result type of unpackNum then does it. – kosmikus Apr 25 '14 at 6:00
    
Now I see. It is insane that two sites in the same let block can be treated as two instances where one binding has no influence on the other. I've upvoted your answer and accepted @acomar 's answer as you suggest that his case is the best solution (avoids the two-site issue). Thanks. – tinlyx Apr 25 '14 at 6:18
    
@TingL In this case it may appear weird to treat the two calls at two different instances. However, in some cases you do want to use two instances, e.g. let f = ("value=" ++) . show in (f (length [1,2]), f 'a'). – chi Apr 25 '14 at 9:35
    
@TingL: Another example I ran into recently involved read itself. read :: Read a => String -> a so read "11" :: Read a => a. You can use this in two different contexts and have it return two different values despite referential transparency. So the compiler can't use the different use sites for read as evidence for a single monomorphic type after you've explicitly told it that it can't do that. – acomar Apr 25 '14 at 14:47

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