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new to clojure, so maybe I am going about this totally the wrong way and all, but is there a way to do this type of thing?

(map (cycle [+ -]) [1 1 1] [1 1 1])

I would want it to return, in this example; (2 0 2)

Thanks to the help below, the solution is:

(map (fn [a b c] (a b c)) (cycle [+ -]) [1 1 1] [1 2 3])

or

(map #(%1 %2 %3) (cycle [+ -]) [1 1 1] [1 2 3])

for short

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2  
(map #(apply % %&) (cycle [+ -]) [1 1 1] [10 10 10] [100 100 100] ...) –  A. Webb Apr 25 '14 at 1:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes -

(map #(%1 %2 %3) (cycle [+ -]) [1 1 1] [1 1 1])
;;(2 0 2)

# is a short hand for an anonymous function and % is the number of the argument passed. So you are just running map against
(+ 1 1),(- 1 1),(+ 1 1)

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Is there a way to do it with an arbitrary number of cycles? like, if my [1 1 1] arrays were also cycles, and I wanted to take n from the output of this whole thing. does that make sense? –  user2251284 Apr 25 '14 at 0:07
1  
You mean like this? (take 10 (map #(%1 %2 %3) (cycle [+ -]) (repeat 1) (repeat 1))) –  Scott Apr 25 '14 at 0:09
1  
map returns a lazy sequence. You can execute it against infinite sequences and use take to "prevent" it from running forever. Also, note that it will run ... until any one of the colls is exhausted. Any remaining items in other colls are ignored. –  Scott Apr 25 '14 at 0:12
    
Ah I see. I was thinking that the %3 meant i was limited to running though the function 3 times (there happened to be 3 elements in each vector). Thank you very much! –  user2251284 Apr 25 '14 at 0:13
1  
Yes sorry. #(%1 %2 %3) is short hand for (fn [a b c] (a b c)) –  Scott Apr 25 '14 at 0:14

The first argument to map needs to be a function that will be applied to each element of the collections. What you have instead is a vector of functions. So what you need is a function that will apply each element of the vector to the corresponding elements in the other vectors. Like so:

(map #(%1 %2 %3) (cycle [+ -]) [1 1 1] [1 1 1])
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1  
must be right since we came up with the same answer. –  Scott Apr 25 '14 at 0:05
    
Thank you, this is great! I am wondering why it does not work for reduce, as in: (reduce #(%1 %2) (cycle [+ -]) [1 10 100]) -to return 91 –  user2251284 Apr 25 '14 at 3:21
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@user2251284: Because reduce has a different signature than map. map takes a function as its first argument and then any number of collections, and then it passes corresponding elements from each collection to the function. reduce takes a function of two arguments, then either a collection or an initial value and a collection. In order to do this with reduce, you'd need to include the cycle of functions in either the seed value or the data itself. Something like (reduce (fn [acc [f val]] (f acc val)) 0 (->> [1 10 100] (interleave (cycle [+ -])) (partition 2))). –  Chuck Apr 25 '14 at 18:45

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