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Generate the Fibonacci sequence in the fewest amount of characters possible. Any language is OK, except for one that you define with one operator, f, which prints the Fibonacci numbers.

Starting point: 25 14 characters in Haskell:

f=0:1:zipWith(+)f(tail f)

f=0:scanl(+)1f
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locked by Shog9 Apr 3 '15 at 16:42

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35  
I can't think of a single course where you'd start with 25 characters of Haskell and be asked to reduce it in any language you choose. – Claudiu Oct 24 '08 at 14:42
3  
Do languages such as Mathematica with a built-in Fibobnacci function count? – Adam Rosenfield Oct 24 '08 at 18:31
1  
@adam - good question.. you should put it in, but people might be unhappy with it =P. then again, we're all using built-in list operations and such.. tough where to draw the line. – Claudiu Oct 24 '08 at 21:54
    
"The smallest number of characters" has nothing to do with programming excellence. The read-/understand-ability of the answers is witness. – Brent.Longborough Oct 30 '08 at 13:49
    
so... The smallest numbers of chars is the winner of this thread? I thought it was about the 'witty' implementations in different languages... – Paulius Oct 30 '08 at 13:53

36 Answers 36

up vote 29 down vote accepted

RePeNt, 9, 8 chars

1↓[2?+1]

Or 10 chars with printing:

1↓[2?+↓£1]

Run using:

RePeNt "1↓[2?+1]"

RePeNt is a stack based toy language I wrote (and am still improving) in which all operators/functions/blocks/loops use Reverse Polish Notation (RPN).

Command      Explanation                                              Stack
-------      -----------                                              -----

1            Push a 1 onto the stack                                  1
↓            Push last stack value                                    1 1
[            Start a do-while loop                                    1 1
2?           Push a two, then pop the 2 and copy the last 2 stack     1 1 1 1
             items onto the stack
+            Add on the stack                                         1 1 2
↓£           Push last stack value then print it                      1 1 2
1            Push a 1 onto the stack                                  1 1 2 1
]            Pop value (1 in this case), if it is a 0 exit the loop   1 1 2
             otherwise go back to the loop start.

The answer is on the stack which builds itself up like:

1 1
1 1 2
1 1 2 3
1 1 2 3 5

It never terminates (it has the eqivilent of a C#/JAVA do { } while(true) loop) because the sequence will never terminate, but a terminating solution can be written thus:

N_1↓nI{2?+}

which is 12 chars.

I wonder if anyone will ever read this :(

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"I wonder if anyone will ever read this": I do have a tendency to skip programming languages with operators I can't easily type on a keyboard. (Which means I never pay attention very far when reading about APL.) Clever little language though ;) – sarnold Feb 6 '11 at 11:41
    
I know the pain, I'm thinking about adapting it to use characters for the operators and leaving some special ones for variables. – Callum Rogers Feb 6 '11 at 14:13
    
currently I use on my GNU/Linux machine ibus, among listed input methods there's rfc 1345, that I keep always "at hand". I think modern systems shouldnt be scared by many special symbols, and I'm starting to appreciate languages that exploit more than ASCII... – ShinTakezou Apr 30 '12 at 14:11
2  
+1 For writing your own language just to win a code golf – Thomas Ahle Jan 16 '13 at 1:39

18 characters of English..

"Fibonacci Sequence"

ok, I fail. :)

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You could easily remove 5 characters - "fibonacci seq".. – dbr Oct 24 '08 at 12:59
1  
@dbr: or remove 11 characters - "fib seq" – Lucas Jones Jan 3 '09 at 15:31
5  
wow, 190 rep, out of 201. – Malfist Feb 12 '09 at 5:20
    
@dbr or remove it all and it will give the same programming result :D – amyassin Sep 8 '11 at 22:47

13 chars of Golfscript:

2,~{..p@+.}do

Update to explain the operation of the script:

  1. 2, makes an array of [0 1]
  2. ~ puts that array on the stack
  3. So, at the time we run the do, we start the stack off with 0 1 (1 at top of stack)

The do loop:

  1. Each . duplicates the top item of the stack; here, we do this twice (leaving us with 0 1 1 1 on initial run)
  2. p prints the topmost value (leaving us with 0 1 1)
  3. @ rotates the top 3 items in the stack, so that the third-topmost is at the top (1 1 0)
  4. + adds the top 2 items in the stack (leaving 1 1)
  5. . duplicates the top value, so that the do loop can check its truthiness (to determine whether to continue)

Tracing this mentally a couple of loops will be enough to tell you that this does the required addition to generate the Fibonacci sequence values.

Since GolfScript has bignums, there will never be an integer overflow, and so the top-of-stack value at the end of the do loop will never be 0. Thus, the script will run forever.

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That's the value of using the right tool for the right problem. Abd then... is the problem really relevant? – rshimoda Oct 24 '08 at 13:47
4  
You wanna talk about "right tool"? See the winning entry for stackoverflow.com/questions/62188 :-) – Chris Jester-Young Oct 24 '08 at 19:35
    
What does it even do? I bet no one looks at my answer. – Callum Rogers Jun 12 '10 at 15:40
    
@Callum: Unlike your answer (which I now did look at), mine actually prints the numbers (even if the program runs endlessly). :-P I'll update the post to say what the script does. – Chris Jester-Young Jun 13 '10 at 21:01
    
Thanks for explaining what it does - it seems our solutions are very similar. I added printing, but I still consider that you won (I am a year late :) – Callum Rogers Jun 13 '10 at 22:21

Language: C++ Compiler Errors
Characters: 205

#define t template <int n> struct 
#define u template <> struct f
t g { int v[0]; };
t f { enum { v = f<n-1>::v + f<n-2>::v }; g<v> x;};
u<1> { enum { v = 1 }; };
u<0> { enum { v = 0 }; };
int main() { f<10> x; }
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Perl 6 - 22 characters:

sub f{1,1...{$^a+$^b}}
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x86 (C-callable) realmode, 14 bytes.
Input is  n  on stack, returns  Fn  in AX.

59 31 C0 E3 08 89 C3 40 93 01 D8 E2 FB C3
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Brainfuck, 33 characters:

+.>+.[<[>+>+<<-]>.[<+>-]>[<+>-]<]
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22 characters with dc:

1[pdd5**v1++2/lxx]dsxx

Invoke with either:

dc -e'1[pdd5**v1++2/lxx]dsxx'

Or:

echo '1[pdd5**v1++2/lxx]dsxx' | dc

Note: not my work, poached from perlmonks.

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does not work here :( the code on perlmonks does though – knittl Sep 9 '09 at 15:02

J, 27 characters for a non-recursive function:

f=:3 :'{:}.@(,+/)^:y(0 1x)'

+/ sums over a list.
(,+/) appends the sum of a list to its tail.
}.@(,+/) sums a list, appends an element to its tail, and drops the first element.
}.@(,+/)^:y iterates the above function y times.
}.@(,+/)^:y(0 1x) applies the above function to the list (0,1) (the x makes it an integer).
{:}.@(,+/)^:y(0 1x) takes the last element of the output list of the above.
f=:3 :'{:}.@(,+/)^:y(0 1x)' defines f to be a function on one variable y.

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how does "f=:3 :'______'" define a function to be of one variable y? Where does the :3 come from? ahh! (head exploding). – Claudiu Oct 24 '08 at 21:53
    
Heh, J is quite interesting, isn't it? All functions are unary (taking implicit 'y' argument) or binary (taking implicit 'x' an 'y') or both (well, in J terms, all verbs can be used as monads or dyads). "3 :" introduces the definition of a monadic verb. – ephemient Oct 24 '08 at 22:52

For the record:

  • Lua (66 chars): function f(n)if n<2 then return n else return f(n-1)+f(n-2)end end
  • JavaScript (41 chars): function f(n){return n<2?n:f(n-1)+f(n-2)}
  • Java (41 chars): int f(int n){return n<2?n:f(n-1)+f(n-2);}

I am not much adept of super concise languages... :-P

Chris is right, I just took the simple, recursive algorithm. Actually, the linear one is even shorter in Lua (thanks to multiple assignment)! JavaScript isn't so lucky and Java is worse, having to declare vars...

  • Lua (60 chars): function f(n)a=1;b=0;for i=1,n do a,b=b,a+b end return b end
  • JavaScript (60 chars): function f(n){a=1;b=i=0;for(;i++<n;){x=a+b;a=b;b=x}return b}
  • Java (71 chars): int f(int n){int a=1,b=0,i=0;for(;i++<n;){int x=a+b;a=b;b=x;}return b;}

I would write Lua's code with local a,b=1,0 but it is longer, so let's pollute _G! ;-) Idem for JS.

For completeness, here are the terminal recursive versions. Lua's one, using tail call, is as fast as the linear one (but 69 chars, it is the longest!) - need to call them with three params, n,1,0.

  • Lua (69 char, longer!): function f(n,a,b)if n<1 then return b else return f(n-1,b,a+b)end end
  • JavaScript (44 chars): function f(n,a,b){return n<1?b:f(n-1,b,a+b)}
  • Java (52 chars): int f(int n,int a,int b){return n<1?b:f(n-1,b,a+b);}
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I bet you my Golfscript implementation is faster than any of yours, for large N. Not because Golfscript is fast (it's quite slow, in fact), but because my solution doesn't do recursion. :-P – Chris Jester-Young Oct 24 '08 at 12:44
    
You are right, and it is even shorter for Lua! Java[Script]'s recursive versions are "better" for the challenge of conciseness... – PhiLho Oct 24 '08 at 13:14
2  
lua: function f(n)return n<2 and n or f(n-1)+f(n-2) end (50 characters) – Eric Mar 27 '11 at 18:48

Corrected after comments (thanks Sebastian), it wasn't a sequence solution, so here we go with 42 chars (includes the \n):

def f(a=0,b=1):
 while 1:yield a;a,b=b,a+b

OLD post below

Python, 38 chars.

f=lambda n:n if n<2 else f(n-1)+f(n-2)

Not so short but the most readable in my opinion :P

EDIT: Here is the analytic way (if someone needs to see it in python :-)

f=lambda n:int(.5+(.5+5**.5/2)**n/5**.5)
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2  
Your iterative way is not very suitable for generating the Fibonacci's sequence. See stackoverflow.com/questions/232861/fibonacci-code-golf#250041 – J.F. Sebastian Oct 30 '08 at 12:46
4  
It's not iterative but analytic – Dario Oct 10 '09 at 19:56

Windows XP (and later versions) batch script. This batch function when given a single argument - amount, generates amount+1 Fibonacci numbers and returns them as a string (BATCH doesn't really have sets) in variable %r% (369 characters, or 347 characters - if we remove indentation):

:f
    set i=0
    set r=1
    set n=1
    set f=0
    :l
    	if %n% GTR %~1 goto e
    	set f=%f% %r%
    	set /A s=%i%+%r%
    	set i=%r%
    	set r=%s%
    	set /A n+=1
    	goto l
    :e
    set r=%f%
    exit /B 0

And here's the complete script, to see it in action (just copy-past it into a CMD or BAT file and run it):

@echo off
call :ff 0
call :ff 1
call :ff 2
call :ff 3
call :ff 5
call :ff 10
call :ff 15
call :ff 20
exit /B 0

:ff
    call :f "%~1"
    echo %~1: %r%
    exit /B 0

:f
    set i=0
    set r=1
    set n=1
    set f=0
    :l
    	if %n% GTR %~1 goto e
    	set f=%f% %r%
    	set /A s=%i%+%r%
    	set i=%r%
    	set r=%s%
    	set /A n+=1
    	goto l
    :e
    set r=%f%
    exit /B 0
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Microsoft Batch - 15 characters

Old challenge, but the world must know it is possible:

%1
%0 %1%2 %1 #

Output is to stderr in unary, counting only the # characters. Depending on the host system's space restrictions, it may produce only the first 14 numbers or so.

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the world must know indeed! accepted as answer to bring it the glory it deserves – Claudiu Jun 20 '12 at 14:42
    
@Claudiu That may be, but it's still longer than both the RePeNt and GolfScript solutions, so by the rules of golf, you should pick one of those (depending on whether you view RePeNt as a valid language) as the winning solution. (Aren't you also a member of Code Golf SE? You should know this drill by now. :-P) – Chris Jester-Young Jun 22 '12 at 13:50
    
oh very well. repent is as valid a language as golf-script (as far as i can tell) so it takes the cake – Claudiu Jun 22 '12 at 18:16

Language: dc, Char count: 20

Shorter dc solution.

dc -e'1df[dsa+plarlbx]dsbx'
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What kind of language is this :rolleyes: – Ikke Oct 10 '09 at 19:59
    
@Ikke, a very common one: $ whatis dc dc (1) - an arbitrary precision calculator – sarnold Feb 6 '11 at 11:42

F#:

(0,1)|>Seq.unfold(fun(a,b)->Some(a,(b,a+b)))

44 Chars

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Here's my best using scheme, in 45 characters:

(let f((a 0)(b 1))(printf"~a,"b)(f b(+ a b)))
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MS Excel: 11 characters:

=SUM(A1:A2)

Type 1 in the top 2 cells, then put the above formula in cell A3. Copy the formula down the spreadsheet.

Starts losing accuracy due to floating point rounding on row 74.
Exceeds 10^307 and overflows to a #NUM! error on row 1477.

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Isn't the act of copying the formula down the spreadsheet a case of manual stack unwinding? – Arafangion Feb 12 '11 at 12:54

Generate the Fibonacci sequence. sequence SEQUENCE!

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1  
That's not an answer... But the remark is valid. – PhiLho Dec 18 '09 at 20:27

C#

I'm seeing a lot of answers that don't actually generate the sequence, but instead give you only the fibonacci number at position *n using recursion, which when looped to generate the sequence gets increasingly slower at higher values of n.

using System;
static void Main()
{
  var x = Math.Sqrt(5);
  for (int n = 0; n < 10; n++)
    Console.WriteLine((Math.Pow((1 + x) / 2, n) - Math.Pow((1 - x) / 2, n)) / p) ;
}
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let rec f l a b =function 0->a::l|1->b::l|n->f (a::l) b (a+b) (n-1) in f [] 1 1;;

80 characters, but truly generates the sequence, in linear time.

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bizarre ... – Claudiu Jun 29 '09 at 16:58

Ruby (30 characters):

def f(n)n<2?n:f(n-1)+f(n-2)end
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@Andrea Ambu

An iterative pythonic fibonacci()'s version should look something like that:

def fibonacci(a=0, b=1):
    while True:
        yield b
        a, b = b, a+b
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Lua - 49 chars

function f(n)return n<2 and n or f(n-1)+f(n-2)end
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Befunge-93

31 chars

Will output an infinite list of the Fibonacci numbers, from 0 upwards, separated by tabs (could be reduced to 29 chars by deleting 9, in the first row, at the expense of no whitespace between numbers).

Unfortunately, all the Befunge-93 interpreters I've tried seem to overflow after 65k, so the output is only correct until and including 46368 (which is F24).

#v::1p1>01g:.\:01p+9,#
 >     ^

Confirmed to work (with caveat above) with the Befunge-93 interpreter in Javascript and the Visual Befunge Applet Full.

I'm proud to say this is a completely original work (i.e. I did not copy this code from anyone), and it's much shorter than the Befunge solution currently on Rosetta Code.

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BrainF**k:

>+++++>+>+<[[>]<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-]<<[>+>+<<-]>>[<<+>>-]<[<]>-]

That'll generate the first 5. To generate more, replace the 5 + at the beginning with more: eg:

>++++++++++++++++++++++>+>+<[[>]<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-]<<[>+>+<<-]>>[<<+>>-]<[<]>-]
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Use that iwriteiam.nl/Ha_bf_online.html there with the CN-execute button. – Tom H Jun 14 '10 at 20:25

Not the shortest, but the fastest at the time of posting. :-)

float f(float n) {
    return (pow(1+sqrt(5.0))/2.0),n) - pow(1+sqrt(5.0))/2.0),n)/sqrt(n));
}
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It does not work. – Andrea Ambu Oct 24 '08 at 15:57
    
I think he means to fix the parentheses and have the second be 1 - sqrt(5.0). This is the fastest for a given n, but it is slower for generating a sequence, and also it won't work for numbers with more than a pretty small amount of digits. – Claudiu Oct 24 '08 at 16:12
    
Two typos. Sorry, this should work: (pow((1+sqrt(5.0)))/2.0),n) - pow((1-sqrt(5.0)))/2.0),n)/sqrt(n)); – mstrobl Oct 24 '08 at 16:14
    
Ack, sorry Claudiu. Did not read your answer before posting. Claudiu is right, although it's wrong that it is slower for generating a sequence. For a sequence of n it's O(n). Fibonacci's recursion is much higher than that, unless you do not recalculate the results previously calculated. – mstrobl Oct 24 '08 at 16:17
1  
If your intent is to generate a sequence, you would not need to recalculate any results -- you'd be saving them, in the sequence. – ephemient Oct 24 '08 at 18:11

33 characters in C:

F(n){return n<2?n:F(n-1)+F(n-2);}
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Delphi Prism (Delphi for .net)

f:func<int32,int32>:=n->iif(n>1,f(n-1)+f(n-2),n)

49 chars

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The previous Ruby example won't work w/o either semicolons or newlines, so it's actually 32 chars. Here's the first example to actually output the sequence, not just return the value of a specified index.

Ruby:
53 chars, including newlines:

def f(n);n<2?1:f(n-1)+f(n-2);end
0.upto 20 {|n|p f n}

or if you want function that outputs a usable data structure, 71 chars:

def f(n);n<2?1:f(n-1)+f(n-2);end
def s(n);(0..n).to_a.map {|n| f(n)};end

or accepting command-line args, 70 chars:

def f(n);n<2?1:f(n-1)+f(n-2);end
p (0..$*[0].to_i).to_a.map {|n| f(n)}
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PDP-11 Assembler (source)

    .globl  start
    .text
start:
    mov $0,(sp)
    mov $27,-(sp)
    jsr pc, lambda
print_r1:
    mov $outbyte,r3
div_loop:
    sxt r0
    div $12,r0
    add $60,r1
    movb    r1,-(r3)
    mov r0,r1
    tst r1
    jne div_loop
    mov $1,r0
    sys 4; outtext; 37
    mov $1,r0
    sys 1
lambda:
    mov 2(sp),r1
    cmp $2,r1
    beq gottwo
    bgt gotone
    sxt r0
    div $2,r0
    tst r1
    beq even
odd:
    mov 2(sp),r1
    dec r1
    sxt r0
    div $2,r0
    mov r0,-(sp)
    jsr pc,lambda
    add $2,sp
    mov r0,r3
    mov r1,r2
    mov r3,r4
    mul r2,r4
    mov r5,r1
    mov r3,r4
    add r2,r4
    mul r2,r4
    add r5,r1
    mul r3,r3
    mov r3,r0
    mul r2,r2
    add r3,r0
    rts pc
even:
    mov 2(sp),r1
    sxt r0
    div $2,r0
    dec r0
    mov r0,-(sp)
    jsr pc,lambda
    add $2,sp
    mov r0,r3
    mov r1,r2
    mov r2,r4
    mul r2,r4
    mov r5,r1
    mov r2,r4
    add r3,r4
    mul r4,r4
    add r5,r1
    mov r2,r4
    add r3,r4
    mul r2,r4
    mov r5,r0
    mul r2,r3
    add r3,r0
    rts pc
gotone:
    mov $1,r0
    mov $1,r1
    rts pc
gottwo:
    mov $1,r0
    mov $2,r1
    rts pc

    .data
outtext:
    .byte 62,63,162,144,40,106,151,142,157,156
    .byte 141,143,143,151,40,156,165,155
    .byte 142,145,162,40,151,163,40
    .byte 60,60,60,60,60
outbyte:
    .byte 12
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