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http://books.google.co.kr/books?id=h0lltXyJ8aIC&pg=PT561&lpg=PT561&dq=0xfc000000+kernel+range&source=bl&ots=gN8tJTbeMP&sig=aJtCwesUXcFZRrB0qsAmFt5IE9Q&hl=en&sa=X&ei=QgZaU6CuAYWhiQfG1IDYBw&ved=0CEAQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=0xfc000000%20kernel%20range&f=false

Please look at the upper page. this is ULK's page.

According the page 546, "0xFC00 0000 is grater than the last physical address of the system. Therefore, the 0xfc00 0000 linear address does not correspond to the 0xfx00 0000 physical address."

It is hard to understand.

I think the Linux kernel use 3G ~ 4G linear address. this address area is 0xC000 0000 ~ 0xFFFF FFFF.

so, 0xFC00 0000 is in this linear address and kernel can use this linear address.

More over, according this book, 0x000b 0fe4 address can map to 0xC00b 0fe4. (offset is 0xc000 0000)

so we can access 0x000b 0fe4 address, as like the below method.

t1 = *((unsigned char*) (0xc00b 0fe4));

If offset is 0xc000 0000, 0xfc00 0000's mapping address is (0xfc00 0000 + 0xc000 0000) but in this book, solution is same as below.

io_mem = ioremap (0xfb00 0000, 0x0020 0000);
t2 = *((unsigned char*)(io_mem + 0x0010 0000);

I think it have to use address (0xfb00 0000 + 0xC000 0000) instead of (0xfb00 0000).

Is there anyone who can answer my question?

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