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Please look at this code.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    string hello = "Hello"
         , world = "World";

    const char *p = (hello+world).c_str();
    cout << "STRING: " << p <<endl;

    return 0;
}

I have no reputation, can't post images so that I will write results by hand.

= Visual Studio 2013 ver.12.0.30110.00

STRING: 

= Dev-C++ ver.4.9.9.2

STRING: HelloWorld

The first following is execution result that compiled by Visual Studio.

Second is compiled by Dev-C++.

I wonder what makes this difference.

I will be looking forward to your reply. Thanks :)

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marked as duplicate by juanchopanza, Luchian Grigore, Mats Petersson, EdChum, Yan Sklyarenko Apr 25 '14 at 9:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
It is undefined behaviour. That is a reason you can observe a difference. –  juanchopanza Apr 25 '14 at 8:25
    
Thanks @juanchopanza, I think it is important that avoid using undefined behavior... –  Leed Apr 25 '14 at 8:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(hello+world).c_str() is only valid until the trailing ;. Accessing the memory afterwards is undefined behavior.

Visual studio probably actually clears the memory, Dev-C++ doesn't bother. Try building a release version with Visual studio (optimizations on) and you'll probably see the same behavior.

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It could also depend on how the << operator uses memory. If std::string uses SSO, it will also depend on whether the temporary string is small enough to fit; if so, p will point to an on stack location, which will be overwritten when operator<< is called. And so on: you really can't make any general statement. –  James Kanze Apr 25 '14 at 8:31
    
Thanks @Luchian Grigore I think Visual Studio bother with optimizations :) –  Leed Apr 25 '14 at 8:34

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