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I need your help, as I was working with AWK many years ago and my knowledge is rusty now. Despite refreshing my memory some by reading several guides, I'm sure that my code contains some mistakes. Most related questions that I've read on SO deal with parsing standard JSON, so the advice is not applicable to my case. The only answer close to what I'm looking for is the accepted answer for this SO question: using awk sed to parse update puppet file. But I'm trying to implement a two-pass parsing, whereas I don't see it in that answer (or don't understand it enough).

After considering other options (from R itself to m4 and various template engines in between), I thought about implementing the solution purely in R via jsonlite and stringr packages, but it's not elegant. I've decided to write a short AWK script that would parse my R project's data collection configuration files before they will be read by my R code. Such file is for the most part a JSON file, but with some additions:

1) it contains embedded variables that are parameters, referring to values of JSON elements in the same file (which for simplicity I decided to place in the root of JSON tree);

2) parameters are denoted by placing a star character ('*') immediately before corresponding elements' names.

Initially I planned two types of embedded variables, which you can see here - internal (references to JSON elements in the same file, format: ${var}) and external (user-supplied, format: %{var}). However, the mechanism and benefits of passing values for the external parameters are still unclear to me, so currently I focus only on parsing configuration file with internal variables only. So, please disregard the external variables for now.

Example configuration file:

{
   "*source":"SourceForge",
   "*action":"import",
   "*schema":"sf0314",
   "data":[
      {
         "indicatorName":"test1",
         "indicatorDescription":"Test Indicator 1",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT * FROM sf0305.users WHERE user_id < 100"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"test2",
         "indicatorDescription":"Test Indicator 2",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT * 
                       FROM sf1104.users a, sf1104.artifact b 
                       WHERE a.user_id = b.submitted_by AND b.artifact_id = 304727"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"totalProjects",
         "indicatorDescription":"Total number of unique projects",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT group_id) FROM ${schema}.user_group"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"totalDevs",
         "indicatorDescription":"Total number of developers per project",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"data.frame",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT COUNT(*) FROM ${schema}.user_group WHERE group_id = %{group_id}"
      }
   ]
}

AWK script:

#!/usr/bin/awk -f

BEGIN {
  first_pass = true;
  param = "\"\*[a-zA-Z^0-9]+?\"";
  regex = "\$\{[a-zA-Z^0-9]+?\}";
  params[""] = 0;
}

{
  if (first_pass)
    if (match($0, param)) {
      print(substr($0, RSTART, RLENGTH));
      params[param] = substr($0, RSTART, RLENGTH);
    }
  else
      gsub(regex, params[regex], $0);
}

END {
  if (first_pass) {
    ARGC++;
    ARGV[ARGIND++] = FILENAME;
    first_pass = false;
    nextfile;
  }
}

Any help will be much appreciated! Thanks!

UPDATE (based on the G. Grothendieck's answer)

The following code (wrapped in a function and slightly modified from the original answer) behaves incorrectly, unexpectedly outputting values of all marked (with '_') configuration keys instead of only the referenced ones:

generateConfig <- function(configTemplate, configFile) {

  suppressPackageStartupMessages(suppressWarnings(library(tcltk)))
  if (!require(gsubfn)) install.packages('gsubfn')
  library(gsubfn)

  regexKeyValue <- '"_([^"]*)":"([^"]*)"'
  regexVariable <- "[$]{([[:alpha:]][[:alnum:].]*)}"

  cfgTmpl <- readLines(configTemplate)

  defns <- strapplyc(cfgTmpl, regexKeyValue, simplify = rbind)
  dict <- setNames(defns[, 2], defns[, 1])
  config <- gsubfn(regexVariable, dict, cfgTmpl)

  writeLines(config, con = configFile)
}

The function is called as follows:

if (updateNeeded()) {
  <...>
  generateConfig(SRDA_TEMPLATE, SRDA_CONFIG)
}

UPDATE 2 (per G. Grothendieck's request)

Function updateNeeded() checks existence and modification time of both files, then, based on logic, a decision is made on whether there is a need to (re)generate the config. file (returns boolean).

The following is the contents of the template configuration file (SRDA_TEMPLATE <- "./SourceForge.cfg.tmpl"):

{
   "_source":"SourceForge",
   "_action":"import",
   "_schema":"sf0314",
   "data":[
      {
         "indicatorName":"test1",
         "indicatorDescription":"Test Indicator 1",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT * FROM sf0305.users WHERE user_id < 100"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"test2",
         "indicatorDescription":"Test Indicator 2",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT * 
                       FROM sf1104.users a, sf1104.artifact b 
                       WHERE a.user_id = b.submitted_by AND b.artifact_id = 304727"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"totalProjects",
         "indicatorDescription":"Total number of unique projects",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT group_id) FROM ${schema}.user_group"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"totalDevs",
         "indicatorDescription":"Total number of developers per project",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"data.frame",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT COUNT(*) FROM ${schema}.user_group WHERE group_id = 78745"
      }
   ]
}

The following is the contents of the auto-generated configuration file (SRDA_CONFIG <- "./SourceForge.cfg.json"):

{
   "_source":"SourceForge",
   "_action":"import",
   "_schema":"sf0314",
   "data":[
      {
         "indicatorName":"test1",
         "indicatorDescription":"Test Indicator 1",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT * FROM sf0305.users WHERE user_id < 100"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"test2",
         "indicatorDescription":"Test Indicator 2",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT * 
                       FROM sf1104.users a, sf1104.artifact b 
                       WHERE a.user_id = b.submitted_by AND b.artifact_id = 304727"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"totalProjects",
         "indicatorDescription":"Total number of unique projects",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"numeric",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT group_id) FROM SourceForge import sf0314.user_group"
      },
      {
         "indicatorName":"totalDevs",
         "indicatorDescription":"Total number of developers per project",
         "indicatorType":"numeric",
         "resultType":"data.frame",
         "requestSQL":"SELECT COUNT(*) FROM SourceForge import sf0314.user_group WHERE group_id = 78745"
      }
   ]
}

Notice SourceForge and import, unexpectedly populated before sf0314.

Help by the answer's author will be much appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
What is the question here? Are you in control of the format of the input configuration file? –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 at 13:37
    
@EtanReisner: The problem is that my AWK code doesn't work. The question, correspondingly, is how to fix the code. Yes, I'm in control of the configuration file. Regardless of whether I will go with the solution kindly provided by G. Grothendieck or not, I'd gladly accept advice on fixing my code as a learning experience. –  Aleksandr Blekh Apr 25 at 14:29
    
What is [a-zA-Z^0-9] supposed to be doing? Matching the numbers, letters and the ^ character? When I run your awk script I get four warnings about unnecessarily escaped characters and a complaint about nextfile in the END section. What "doesn't work" about it for you? –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 at 14:37
1  
So in trying to make your awk work I've found quite a lot of issues. You are trying to use the regex patterns as your keys in the params table but they never change so that will not get you at all what you want. Your regexes themselves need tweaking (at least here) for the warnings awk throws about them. You are setting the variable name as the value in your params table (because you never deal with the right hand side of the line). –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 at 14:47
1  
^ is complement range when it is the first character in the square brackets. So [0-9] means match any number between 0 and 9 whereas [^0-9] means match anything that isn't a number between 0 and 9. –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am assuming the objective is to replace each occurrance of ${...} with the definition given on the star lines. In the post it indicates that you are looking at awk because an R solution was not elegant but I think that may have been due to the approach taken using R and I am assuming an R solution is still acceptable if by using a different approach it yields a solution that is reasonably compact.

Here config.json is the name of the input json file and config.out.json is the output file with the definitions substituted in.

We read in the file and use strapplyc to extract out a 2 column matrix of the definitions, defns. We rework this into a vector, dict, whose values are the values of the variables and whose names are the names of the variables. Then we use gsubfn to insert the definitions using the dict list. Finally we write it back out.

library(gsubfn)

Lines <- readLines("config.json")

defns <- strapplyc(Lines, '"\\*([^"]*)":"([^"]*)"', simplify = rbind)
dict <- setNames(as.list(defns[, 2]), defns[, 1])
Lines.out <- gsubfn("[$]{([[:alpha:]][[:alnum:].]*)}", dict, Lines)

writeLines(Lines.out, con = "config.out.json")

REVISED dict should be a list rather than a named character vector.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your solution! You're right - R is fine, the solution appears to be even much more elegant than my AWK code (which most likely could be re-written to approximately match your R solution). Before your answer, I've never heard of gsubfn package - usually people recommend plyr or R base *apply functions. But, I understand why you recommend gsubfn :-). Thank you again! –  Aleksandr Blekh Apr 25 at 14:39
    
Strangely, this code (slightly modified) started to work incorrectly, unexpectedly placing values of other (non-referenced) configuration keys before the referenced ones. I will add the code as a temporary update of your answer. –  Aleksandr Blekh Apr 27 at 4:38
    
I just updated your answer with my code for investigation, but it mysteriously disappeared... –  Aleksandr Blekh Apr 27 at 5:07
    
Posted my update with request to you for help at the bottom of my question instead of your answer. Hopefully now the update won't disappear. Looking forward to hearing from you! –  Aleksandr Blekh Apr 27 at 8:23
1  
There was a bug in the code. gsubfn requires that dict is a list in this case. (If its character then it reduces to gsub). Have corrected the dict<- line in the code. –  G. Grothendieck Apr 27 at 12:32

I believe:

#!/usr/bin/awk -f

BEGIN {
  param = "\"\\*([a-zA-Z]+?)\":\"([^\"]*)\"";
  regex = "\\${([a-zA-Z]+?)}";
}

NR == FNR {
    if (match($0, param, a)) {
      params[a[1]] = a[2]
    }
    next
}

match($0, regex, a) {
  gsub(regex, params[a[1]], $0);
}
1

does what you want (when run as awk -f file.awk input.conf input.conf) for your given input.

share|improve this answer
1  
What awk are you using? It uses two. NR == FNR is a test for the first input file. So that block executes the first time (and next stops processing the script there) and the second time through the other block gets a chance to match. If you can guarantee that there will be a marker or that no definition will come after the first usage you can do it all in one pass. –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 at 15:10
1  
So that script above is gawk specific I believe (the third argument to match). I'm not sure what the issue near next is but that may be another compat issue (or simply a missing semicolon that whichever of [mn]awk you are using expects that gawk doesn't need). –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 at 15:27
1  
To make the above single pass simply remove the next line. (You could also then drop the NR == FNR outer block and make the pattern match part look like the regex match part if you wanted to.) And then only run it with the input file listed once. –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 at 15:29
2  
If there are two different ${...} on the same line this code will replace them both with the value associated with the first. –  G. Grothendieck Apr 25 at 15:43
1  
@G.Grothendieck True. It should probably use a[1] in the first argument to gsub to only replace what was originally matched. Though that still won't handle multiple replacements correctly. For that you would also need to loop over calls to match. –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 at 15:47

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