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I am writing a program that must accept input from the user.

#note: Python 2.7 users should use `raw_input`, the equivalent of 3.X's `input`
age = int(input("Please enter your age: "))
if age >= 18: 
    print("You are able to vote in the United States!")
else:
    print("You are not able to vote in the United States.")

This works as expected if the user enters sensible data.

C:\Python\Projects> canyouvote.py
Please enter your age: 23
You are able to vote in the United States!

But if they make a mistake, then it crashes:

C:\Python\Projects> canyouvote.py
Please enter your age: dickety six
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "canyouvote.py", line 1, in <module>
    age = int(input("Please enter your age: "))
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'dickety six'

Instead of crashing, I would like it to try getting the input again. Like this:

C:\Python\Projects> canyouvote.py
Please enter your age: dickety six
Sorry, I didn't understand that.
Please enter your age: 26
You are able to vote in the United States!

How can I accomplish this? What if I also wanted to reject values like -1, which is a valid int, but nonsensical in this context?

share|improve this question
13  
PS. Some may think it's wrong that I'm answering my own question right after posting it. Before downvoting, please read It's OK to Ask and Answer Your Own Questions. See also Putting the Community back in Wiki, which says "Compiling a canonical reference" is "something wonderful". Questions like this one are asked often enough to justify writing a post that can concisely answer all of them. – Kevin Apr 25 '14 at 13:32
up vote 179 down vote accepted
+400

The simplest way to accomplish this would be to put the input method in a while loop. Use continue when you get bad input, and break out of the loop when you're satisfied.

When Your Input Might Raise an Exception

Use try and catch to detect when the user enters data that can't be parsed.

while True:
    try:
        # Note: Python 2.x users should use raw_input, the equivalent of 3.x's input
        age = int(input("Please enter your age: "))
    except ValueError:
        print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
        #better try again... Return to the start of the loop
        continue
    else:
        #age was successfully parsed!
        #we're ready to exit the loop.
        break
if age >= 18: 
    print("You are able to vote in the United States!")
else:
    print("You are not able to vote in the United States.")

Implementing Your Own Validation Rules

If you want to reject values that Python can successfully parse, you can add your own validation logic.

while True:
    data = input("Please enter a loud message (must be all caps): ")
    if not data.isupper():
        print("Sorry, your response was not loud enough.")
        continue
    else:
        #we're happy with the value given.
        #we're ready to exit the loop.
        break

while True:
    data = input("Pick an answer from A to D:")
    if data.lower() not in ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'):
        print("Not an appropriate choice.")
    else:
        break

Combining Exception Handling and Custom Validation

Both of the above techniques can be combined into one loop.

while True:
    try:
        age = int(input("Please enter your age: "))
    except ValueError:
        print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
        continue

    if age < 0:
        print("Sorry, your response must not be negative.")
        continue
    else:
        #age was successfully parsed, and we're happy with its value.
        #we're ready to exit the loop.
        break
if age >= 18: 
    print("You are able to vote in the United States!")
else:
    print("You are not able to vote in the United States.")

Encapsulating it All in a Function

If you need to ask your user for a lot of different values, it might be useful to put this code in a function, so you don't have to retype it every time.

def get_non_negative_int(prompt):
    while True:
        try:
            value = int(input(prompt))
        except ValueError:
            print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
            continue

        if value < 0:
            print("Sorry, your response must not be negative.")
            continue
        else:
            break
    return value

age = get_non_negative_int("Please enter your age: ")
kids = get_non_negative_int("Please enter the number of children you have: ")
salary = get_non_negative_int("Please enter your yearly earnings, in dollars: ")

Putting it all together

You can extend this idea to make a very generic input function:

def sanitised_input(prompt, type_=None, min_=None, max_=None, range_=None): 
    if min_ is not None and max_ is not None and max_ < min_: 
        raise ValueError("min_ must be less than or equal to max_.") 
    while True: 
        ui = input(prompt) 
        if type_ is not None: 
            try: 
                ui = type_(ui) 
            except ValueError: 
                print("Input type must be {0}.".format(type_.__name__)) 
                continue
        if max_ is not None and ui > max_: 
            print("Input must be less than or equal to {0}.".format(max_)) 
        elif min_ is not None and ui < min_: 
            print("Input must be greater than or equal to {0}.".format(min_)) 
        elif range_ is not None and ui not in range_: 
            if isinstance(range_, range): 
                template = "Input must be between {0.start} and {0.stop}."
                print(template.format(range_)) 
            else: 
                template = "Input must be {0}."
                if len(range_) == 1: 
                    print(template.format(*range_)) 
                else: 
                    print(template.format(" or ".join((", ".join(map(str, 
                                                                     range_[:-1])), 
                                                       str(range_[-1]))))) 
        else: 
            return ui 

With usage such as:

age = sanitised_input("Enter your age: ", int, 1, 101)
answer = sanitised_input("Enter your answer", str.lower, range_=('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'))

Common Pitfalls, and Why you Should Avoid Them

The Redundant Use of Redundant input Statements

This method works but is generally considered poor style:

data = input("Please enter a loud message (must be all caps): ")
while not data.isupper():
    print("Sorry, your response was not loud enough.")
    data = input("Please enter a loud message (must be all caps): ")

It might look attractive initially because it's shorter than the while True method, but it violates the Don't Repeat Yourself principle of software development. This increases the likelihood of bugs in your system. What if you want to backport to 2.7 by changing input to raw_input, but accidentally change only the first input above? It's a SyntaxError just waiting to happen.

Recursion Will Blow Your Stack

If you've just learned about recursion, you might be tempted to use it in get_non_negative_int so you can dispose of the while loop.

def get_non_negative_int(prompt):
    try:
        value = int(input(prompt))
    except ValueError:
        print("Sorry, I didn't understand that.")
        return get_non_negative_int(prompt)

    if value < 0:
        print("Sorry, your response must not be negative.")
        return get_non_negative_int(prompt)
    else:
        return value

This appears to work fine most of the time, but if the user enters invalid data enough times, the script will terminate with a RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded. You may think "no fool would make 1000 mistakes in a row", but you're underestimating the ingenuity of fools!

share|improve this answer
7  
This is a brilliant community wiki; well done! I have to admit that I'm sometimes guilty of doing that redundant thing where I redundantly reuse the prompt, therefore making it redundant. You're right, though, DRYer is better. – Dave Yarwood Jun 12 '14 at 17:46
8  
@RokKralj You don't seem to be a Python user. In Python, exceptions are by far and away the most correct way to do this. See this question on the topic. Also read the comment on it ;). – Veedrac Sep 24 '14 at 11:06
    
I actually do usually prefer "look before you leap" to "it is easier to ask forgiveness than seek permission". However, in the specific case of determining whether a string could be converted into an integer, I can't think of a very straightforward way to do it without try-except. (str.isdigit is no good, since it doesn't return True for strings like "-23") – Kevin Sep 24 '14 at 13:54
12  
@RokKralj That links to the docs; that's a pretty good source. But how about the fact that loops are implemented with exceptions? This is because iterators use exceptions to signal reaching the end. It's implemented equivalently to this (note all the exceptions!) and yes, exceptions are being used to return values. I'm not sure how much more definitive a proof can get! – Veedrac Sep 24 '14 at 15:03
2  
@Veedrac: Great response, but you could have just noted that the very answer he linked to already effectively says all of that if he read past the first paragraph… – abarnert Apr 13 '15 at 3:00

Though the accepted answer is amazing. I would also like to share a quick hack for this problem. (This takes care of the negative age problem as well.)

f=lambda age: (age.isdigit() and ((int(age)>=18  and "Can vote" ) or "Cannot vote")) or \
f(raw_input("invalid input. Try again\nPlease enter your age: "))
print f(raw_input("Please enter your age: "))

P.S. This code is for python 2.x and can be exported to 3.x by changing the raw_input and print functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that this code is recursive, but recursion isn't necessary here, and as Kevin said, it can blow your stack. – PM 2Ring Jan 31 at 8:12
    
@PM2Ring - you are right. But my purpose here was just to show how "short circuiting" can minimise (beautify) long pieces of code. – aaveg Feb 3 at 8:58

Why would you do a while True and then break out of this loop while you can also just put your requirements in the while statement since all you want is to stop once you have the age?

age = None
while age is None:
    input_value = raw_input("Please enter your age: ")
    try:
        # try and convert the string input to a number
        age = int(input_value)
    except ValueError:
        # tell the user off
        print "{input} is not a number, please enter a number only".format(input=input_value)
if age >= 18:
    print("You are able to vote in the United States!")
else:
    print("You are not able to vote in the United States.")

This would result in the following:

Please enter your age: *potato*
potato is not a number, please enter a number only
Please enter your age: *5*
You are not able to vote in the United States.

this will work since age will never have a value that will not make sense and the code follows the logic of your "business process"

share|improve this answer

So, I was messing around with something similar to this recently, and I came up with the following solution, which uses a way of getting input that rejects junk, before it's even checked in any logical way.

read_single_keypress() courtesy http://stackoverflow.com/a/6599441/4532996

def read_single_keypress() -> str:
    """Waits for a single keypress on stdin.
    -- from :: http://stackoverflow.com/a/6599441/4532996
    """

    import termios, fcntl, sys, os
    fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
    # save old state
    flags_save = fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_GETFL)
    attrs_save = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
    # make raw - the way to do this comes from the termios(3) man page.
    attrs = list(attrs_save) # copy the stored version to update
    # iflag
    attrs[0] &= ~(termios.IGNBRK | termios.BRKINT | termios.PARMRK
                  | termios.ISTRIP | termios.INLCR | termios. IGNCR
                  | termios.ICRNL | termios.IXON )
    # oflag
    attrs[1] &= ~termios.OPOST
    # cflag
    attrs[2] &= ~(termios.CSIZE | termios. PARENB)
    attrs[2] |= termios.CS8
    # lflag
    attrs[3] &= ~(termios.ECHONL | termios.ECHO | termios.ICANON
                  | termios.ISIG | termios.IEXTEN)
    termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSANOW, attrs)
    # turn off non-blocking
    fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, flags_save & ~os.O_NONBLOCK)
    # read a single keystroke
    try:
        ret = sys.stdin.read(1) # returns a single character
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        ret = 0
    finally:
        # restore old state
        termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSAFLUSH, attrs_save)
        fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, flags_save)
    return ret

def until_not_multi(chars) -> str:
    """read stdin until !(chars)"""
    import sys
    chars = list(chars)
    y = ""
    sys.stdout.flush()
    while True:
        i = read_single_keypress()
        _ = sys.stdout.write(i)
        sys.stdout.flush()
        if i not in chars:
            break
        y += i
    return y

def _can_you_vote() -> str:
    """a practical example:
    test if a user can vote based purely on keypresses"""
    print("can you vote? age : ", end="")
    x = int("0" + until_not_multi("0123456789"))
    if not x:
        print("\nsorry, age can only consist of digits.")
        return
    print("your age is", x, "\nYou can vote!" if x >= 18 else "Sorry! you can't vote")

_can_you_vote()

You can find the complete module here.

Example:

$ ./input_constrain.py
can you vote? age : a
sorry, age can only consist of digits.
$ ./input_constrain.py 
can you vote? age : 23<RETURN>
your age is 23
You can vote!
$ _

Note that the nature of this implementation is it closes stdin as soon as something that isn't a digit is read. I didn't hit enter after a, but I needed to after the numbers.

You could merge this with the thismany() function in the same module to only allow, say, three digits.

share|improve this answer

If you want a vaild, no number, response, I would do this:

age = input("Please enter your age: ")
while age == '':
    print("Sorry, I didn't understand that")
    age = input("Please enter your age: ")
while not age.isalpha():
    if age >= 18: 
        print("You are able to vote in the United States!")
        break
    elif age < 18:
        print("You are not able to vote in the United States.")
        break
    else:
        print("Sorry, I didn't understand that")
        age = int(input("Please enter your age: "))
    while age == type(float):
        print("Sorry, I didn't understand that")
        age = input("Please enter your age: ")

else:
    print("Sorry, I didn't understand that")
    age = input("Please enter your age: ")

This makes sure that the type of input isn't a float, and that it is a number. If they just press enter it will ask their input again.

share|improve this answer
    
This repeats the input prompt, and does the wrong thing if the user does not provide an empty input the first time. – tripleee Jan 9 at 18:46
import re

pattern = r'^[-+]?[0-9]*$'
while True:
    string = input("age >> ")
    if re.match(pattern, string) is not None:
        age = int(string)
        break

if age >= 18: 
    print("You are able to vote in the United States!")
else:
    print("You are not able to vote in the United States.")
share|improve this answer

protected by Robert Harvey Jan 14 '15 at 21:13

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