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I was writing an .spec file for a rpm package and I'm having an issue. I need to install that package with a specific version of another package. Let's take a python package example. So, I write it:

Requires        : bash, grep, python >= 2.6.7-4b

But, the package is installed even if the python package is in the 2.6.6 version. If I remove python package, the system shows me that my package needs python 2.6.7.

Is there something wrong?

Output from rpm -q --provides python:

Distutils
python(abi) = 2.6
python-abi = 2.6
python-ctypes = 1.0.1
python-hashlib = 20081120
python-sqlite = 2.3.2
python-uuid = 1.31
python-x86_64 = 2.6.6-52.el6
python2 = 2.6.6
python = 2.6.6-52.el6
python(x86-64) = 2.6.6-52.el6

Output from rpm -qpR $yourpackage.rpm:

/bin/sh
python >= 2.6.7-4b
bash
grep
rpmlib(CompressedFileNames) <= 3.0.4-1
rpmlib(FileDigests) <= 4.6.0-1
rpmlib(PartialHardlinkSets) <= 4.0.4-1
rpmlib(PayloadFilesHavePrefix) <= 4.0-1
rpmlib(PayloadIsXz) <= 5.2-1
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Can you post the output for rpm -q --provides python on the system where 2.6.6 is installed and satisfies your packages requirement? Also post the rpm -qR $yourpackage or rpm -qpR $yourpackage.rpm output please. –  Etan Reisner Apr 25 '14 at 14:58
    
@EtanReisner the output of the first command is: Distutils python(abi) = 2.6 python-abi = 2.6 python-ctypes = 1.0.1 python-hashlib = 20081120 python-sqlite = 2.3.2 python-uuid = 1.31 python-x86_64 = 2.6.6-52.el6 python2 = 2.6.6 python = 2.6.6-52.el6 python(x86-64) = 2.6.6-52.el6 and the output of the last command is: /bin/sh python >= 2.6.7-4b bash grep rpmlib(CompressedFileNames) <= 3.0.4-1 rpmlib(FileDigests) <= 4.6.0-1 rpmlib(PartialHardlinkSets) <= 4.0.4-1 rpmlib(PayloadFilesHavePrefix) <= 4.0-1 rpmlib(PayloadIsXz) <= 5.2-1 –  jcfaracco Apr 25 '14 at 17:07
    
I did a quick test on my CentOS 5 machine where the installed version of python is 2.4.3-56 (with a dummy package that requires python >= 2.4.4-15) and rpm failed to install the package correctly. Are you sure the system has the python package you are expecting? What does 'rpm -q --whatprovides python` say on the system? –  Etan Reisner May 2 '14 at 3:17
    
@EtanReisner When I put python(x86-64) >= 2.6.7-4b it works. =) But How can I define a generic way to identify what architecture I'm using. For example, if my machine is i386 it needs to require python(x86-32) and if I'm using x86_64 it needs to require python(x86-64). –  jcfaracco May 5 '14 at 16:26
    
Is there really a python(x86-32) provide on 32bit systems? That would surprise me. You can use %_arch for the current architecture in the spec file and do detection/etc. based on that if you need to but I don't know why changing python >= ... to python(x86-64) >= ... should make a difference here. –  Etan Reisner May 5 '14 at 16:37

1 Answer 1

The ''Requires:'' tag is ignored unless you add ''Autoreq: no'' as well.

Newer versions of rpmbuild calculate the requirements automatically and ignore ''Requires:'' unless the feature is turned off.

I have run into this issue multiple times and it is worth noting that you should at first run rpmbuild without ''Autoreq: no'', note the autodetected dependencies, and add them to the ''Required:'' tag before the final run with ''Autoreq: no''.

Is also worth noting that the automatic detection of dependencies is a little buggy and has some issues with comments. I packaged a perl script with a comment containing " ... then use a module ... " a while ago. Autoreq detected that as being perl module "perl a" and added it to the dependencies making my rpm useless.

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