Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I know there are tons of other realloc questions and answers and I have read almost all of them, but I still couldn't manage to fix my problem.

I decided to stop trying when I accidentaly discovered a very strange behaviour of my code. I introduced a line to try something, but although I don't use the value of newElems in main, the line changes the behaviour.

When the line is commented, the code fails at first realloc. Including the line, the first realloc works. (it still crashes on the second one).

Any ideas on what might be happening?

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    Pqueue q = pqueue_new(3);
    Node a = {.name = "a"}, b = {.name = "b"},
         c = {.name = "c"}, d = {.name = "d"};

    push(& q, & a, 3);
    // the next one is the strange line: as you can see, it doesn't modify q
    // but commenting it out produces different behaviour
    Pqueue_elem* newElems = realloc(q.elems, 4 * q.capacity * sizeof *newElems);
    push(& q, & b, 5);
    push(& q, & c, 4);

    char s[5];
    Node* n;
    for (int i = 1; i <= 65; ++i) {
        sprintf(s, "%d", i);
        n = malloc(sizeof *n);
        n->name = strdup(s);
        push(& q, n, i);
    }

    Node* current = NULL;
    while ((current = pop(& q))) {
        printf("%s ", current->name);
    }
    return 0;
}

and the push function:

void push(Pqueue* q, Node* item, int priority) {
    if (q->size >= q->capacity) {
        if (DEBUG)
            fprintf(stderr, "Reallocating bigger queue from capacity %d\n",
                    q->capacity);
        q->capacity *= 2;
        Pqueue_elem* newElems = realloc(q->elems,
                                        q->capacity * sizeof *newElems);
        check(newElems, "a bigger elems array");
        q->elems = newElems;
    }

    // append at the end, then find its correct place and move it there
    int idx = ++q->size, p;
    while ((p = PARENT(idx)) && priority > q->elems[p].priority) {
        q->elems[idx] = q->elems[p];
        idx = p;
    }
    // after exiting the while, idx is at the right place for the element
    q->elems[idx].data = item;
    q->elems[idx].priority = priority;
}

The pqueue_new function:

Pqueue pqueue_new(unsigned int size) {
    if (size < 4)
        size = 4;
    Pqueue* q = malloc(sizeof *q);
    check(q, "a new queue.");
    q->capacity = size;
    q->elems = malloc(q->capacity * sizeof *(q->elems));
    check(q->elems, "queue's elements");

    return *q;
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Mysticial May 14 '14 at 6:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
The "irrelevant part" that you removed may very well be the most relevant: I assume this is where you write stuff into newElems, right? –  dasblinkenlight Apr 25 '14 at 14:16
    
Yes, and no. I don't use newElements outside that if, only q->elems (which has been assigned to newElems). I will include it –  Ciprian Tomoiaga Apr 25 '14 at 14:20
1  
@CiprianTomoiaga It does not matter if you write to the block pointed to by newElems or q->elems, it's the same block. The error is likely to be there. Use valdrind to find it faster. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 25 '14 at 14:24
    
Why dereference q when you return from pqueue_new, and then almost everywhere use the address of it main()? It'd be easier to stick to *q in main, potentially avoiding awkward bugs. –  Evert Apr 25 '14 at 14:30
    
@EliasVanOotegem Because realloc returns a pointer to the new memory. It doesn't modify the passed pointer. As demonstrated here I multiply q->capacity by 2 in push, right before realloc call and use that new value. No, it is recommended to check for NULL before assigning to q.elems and only assign if it's valid. Right? –  Ciprian Tomoiaga Apr 25 '14 at 14:32

2 Answers 2

realloc will change the amount of memory that is allocated, if needed. It is also free to move the data to another place in memory if that's more efficient (avoiding memory fragmentation).
The function, then, returns a new pointer to the new location in memory where your data is hiding. You're calling realloc, and allocating (probably) four times as much memory as before, so it's very likely that that allocated memory is situated elsewhere in memory.

In your comment, you said realloc works like free + malloc. Well, in some cases it can behave similarly, however: realloc and free are different functions, that do different tasks. Both are functions that manage the dynamic memory, so yes, obviously there are similarities, and in the case of realloc, sometimes they can seem to be doing the same thing, however: As I explained here, realloc and free are fundamentally different functions

However, by not assigning the return value of realloc to q.elems, you're left with a pointer to a memory address that is no longer valid. The rest of your program can, and probably does, exhibit signs of undefined behaviour, then.

Unless you show some more code, I suspect this will take care of the problem:

//change:
Pqueue_elem* newElems = realloc(q.elems, 4 * q.capacity * sizeof *newElems);
//to
q.elems = realloc(q.elems, 4 * q.capacity * sizeof *newElems);

Or better yet, check for NULL pointers:

Pqueue_elem* newElems = realloc(q.elems, 4 * q.capacity * sizeof *newElems);
if (newElems == NULL)
    exit( EXIT_FAILURE );// + fprintf(stderr, "Fatal error...");
q.elems = newElems;//<-- assign new pointer!

Looking at your pqueue_new function, I would suggest a different approach. Have it return the pointer to Pqueue. You're working with a piece of dynamic memory, treat it accordingly, and have your code reflect that all the way through:

Pqueue * pqueue_new(size_t size)
{//size_t makes more sense
    if (size < 4)
        size = 4;
    Pqueue* q = malloc(sizeof *q);
    check(q, "a new queue.");
    q->capacity = size;
    q->elems = malloc(q->capacity * sizeof *(q->elems));
    check(q->elems, "queue's elements");

    return q;
}

Alternatively, pass the function a pointer to a stack variable:

void pqueue_new(Pqueue *q, size_t size)
{
    if (q == NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "pqueue_new does not do NULL pointers, I'm not Chuck Norris");
        return;//or exit
    }
    if (size < 4)
        size = 4;
    check(q, "a new queue.");
    q->capacity = size;
    q->elems = malloc(q->capacity * sizeof *(q->elems));
    check(q->elems, "queue's elements");
}
//call like so:
int main ( void )
{
    Pqueue q;
    pqueue_new(&q, 3);
}

Those would be the more common approaches.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! Ouh, so the call to realloc in main basically frees the q.elems (by moving it to a new zone, pointed at by newElems). I will use that –  Ciprian Tomoiaga Apr 25 '14 at 14:35
    
@CiprianTomoiaga: sort of. It really depends, realloc, free, malloc and calloc don't just blindly allocate memory. They map & track where what amount of memory is allocated, and manage the memory so it doesn't become too fragmented. the allocated blocks can be padded and, if you call realloc moved to another section of the heap, if that means the memory is managed more efficiently. My guess would be that this is what's happened in your case –  Elias Van Ootegem Apr 25 '14 at 14:38
    
Depending on the library/OS used, no, realloc will not free q.elems, and you should not have to reassign q.elems = newElems. In case of Linux, please read the manual page ("The realloc() function changes the size of the memory block pointed to by ptr to size bytes. The contents will be unchanged in the range from the start of the region up to the minimum of the old and new sizes.") –  Evert Apr 25 '14 at 14:39
1  
@Evert: The question wasn't if realloc can perform the task of free, but how it works internally. if the pointer points to data @ 0x00123, that data can, after a call to realloc, be moved to 0x00A44, that's all I was saying. –  Elias Van Ootegem Apr 25 '14 at 14:41
    
Sorry, my bad: the return value can indeed point to a different area than the input pointer. –  Evert Apr 25 '14 at 14:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you all for the suggestions! I wouldn't have solved it without them,

The strange behaviour was caused by an off by one error. I was reallocating the queue only when q->size >= q->capacity, but since q was indexed from 0, it meant that before realloc I was writing in a forbidden location (q->elems[q->size]), which messed everything up.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.