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I want to store the result of this curl function in a variable, how can I do so?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <curl/curl.h>

int main(void)
{
  CURL *curl;
  CURLcode res;

  curl = curl_easy_init();
  if(curl) {
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_URL, "curl.haxx.se");
    res = curl_easy_perform(curl);

    /* always cleanup */
    curl_easy_cleanup(curl);
  }
  return 0;
}

thanks, I solved it like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <curl/curl.h>

function_pt(void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, void *stream){
    printf("%d", atoi(ptr));
}

int main(void)
{
  CURL *curl;
  CURLcode res;
  curl = curl_easy_init();
  if(curl) {
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_URL, "curl.haxx.se");
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, function_pt);
    curl_easy_perform(curl);
    curl_easy_cleanup(curl);
  }
  system("pause");
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 45 down vote accepted

You can set a callback function to receive incoming data chunks using curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, myfunc);

The callback will take a user defined argument that you can set using curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEDATA, p)

Here's a snippet of code that passes a buffer struct string {*ptr; len} to the callback function and grows that buffer on each call using realloc().

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <curl/curl.h>

struct string {
  char *ptr;
  size_t len;
};

void init_string(struct string *s) {
  s->len = 0;
  s->ptr = malloc(s->len+1);
  if (s->ptr == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "malloc() failed\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  s->ptr[0] = '\0';
}

size_t writefunc(void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, struct string *s)
{
  size_t new_len = s->len + size*nmemb;
  s->ptr = realloc(s->ptr, new_len+1);
  if (s->ptr == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "realloc() failed\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  memcpy(s->ptr+s->len, ptr, size*nmemb);
  s->ptr[new_len] = '\0';
  s->len = new_len;

  return size*nmemb;
}

int main(void)
{
  CURL *curl;
  CURLcode res;

  curl = curl_easy_init();
  if(curl) {
    struct string s;
    init_string(&s);

    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_URL, "curl.haxx.se");
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, writefunc);
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEDATA, &s);
    res = curl_easy_perform(curl);

    printf("%s\n", s.ptr);
    free(s.ptr);

    /* always cleanup */
    curl_easy_cleanup(curl);
  }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very good answer. I got all of em in the string. Yipee! –  Viz Jan 21 at 12:21
    
Nice. Even nicer if all those size_t (besides len itself) would be declared const. –  alk Jun 8 at 18:31

I had been running into a similar problem. I was getting this error:

* HTTP 1.0, assume close after body
< HTTP/1.0 200 OK
< Content-Type: text/plain
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
< ETag: "3084120343"
< Last-Modified: Thu, 03 Apr 2014 22:23:51 GMT
< Content-Length: 10
< Connection: close
< Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 23:33:08 GMT
< Server: EC2ws
<
* Failed writing body (0 != 10)
* Closing connection #0
* Failed writing received data to disk/application

The problem was the return of the callback function. We were saying return 0; where we should have been returning the length written--as Alexandre posted, return size*nmemb;.

Thanks @Alexandre

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From reading the manual here: http://curl.haxx.se/libcurl/c/curl_easy_setopt.html I think you need several calls to CURL_SETOPT, the first being the URL you want to process, the second being something like:

curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, function_ptr);

Where function_ptr matches this signature:

size_t function( void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, void *stream)

What happens here is you denote a callback function which libcurl will call when it has some output to write from whatever transfer you've invoked. You can get it to automatically write to a file, or pass it a pointer to a function which will handle the output itself. Using this function you should be able to assemble the various output strings into one piece and then use them in your program.

I'm not sure what other options you may have to set / what else affects how you want your app to behave, so have a good look through that page.

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