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I have tables Building and Address, where each Building is associated with 0..n Addresses.

I'd like to list Buildings with an associated Address. If a Building has several entrances, and thus several Addresses, I don't care which one is displayed. If a Building has no known addresses, the address fields should be null.

This is, I want something like a left join that joins each row at most once.

How can I express this in Oracle SQL?

PS: My query will include rather involved restrictions on both tables. Therefore, I'd like to avoid repeating those restrictions in the query text.

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how are these tables associated with each other? On a single PK/FK column, or something more involved? –  davek Feb 24 '10 at 21:52
    
Technically, it is an indirect association: Address n : 1 AddressMaster n : 1 BuildingMaster 1 : Building. Each of these associations is represented by a single column foreign key referencing the other table's primary key. –  meriton Feb 24 '10 at 22:00
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would consider querying the address in the SELECT clause, e.g.:

SELECT b.*
      ,(SELECT a.text
        FROM   addresses a
        WHERE  a.buildingid = b.id
        AND    ROWNUM=1) as atext
FROM   building b;

The ROWNUM=1 means "just get one if there are any, don't care which".

The advantage of this approach is that it will probably perform better than most alternatives, as long as a suitable index on addresses.buildingid exists. It will stop looking for more addresses as soon as it finds one for each building queried.

The downside to this approach is if you want multiple columns from the address table, you can't - although you can concatenate them together into one string.

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+1: I was trying for this, but wasn't 100% on how to do it. –  OMG Ponies Feb 25 '10 at 3:18
    
I call this the "poor man's outer join" :) –  Jeffrey Kemp Feb 26 '10 at 9:42
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Because you don't care which of many addresses is displayed:

Oracle 9i+:

WITH summary AS (
      SELECT b.*,
             a.*,
             ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY b.building_id) rn
        FROM BUILDINGS b
   LEFT JOIN ADDRESSES a ON a.building_id = b.building_id)
SELECT s.*
  FROM summary s
 WHERE s.rn = 1

Non-Subquery Factoring Equivalent:

SELECT s.*
  FROM (SELECT b.*,
               a.*,
               ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY b.building_id) rn
           FROM BUILDINGS b
      LEFT JOIN ADDRESSES a ON a.building_id = b.building_id) s
 WHERE s.rn = 1
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Interesting related read: explainextended.com/2009/05/06/oracle-row_number-vs-rownum –  OMG Ponies Feb 24 '10 at 22:58
    
+1: very nice general solution. Thanks! I wish I could accept two answers. –  meriton Feb 27 '10 at 16:17
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what you could do is an restriction on the addresses dat you join. For instance by requiring that there is no address with a lower id:

select *
from building b
left join addresses a on (a.buildingid = b.id)
where not exists (select 1 from addresses a2
                  where a2.buildingid = b.id and a2.id < a.id)

in this case you will get at most 1 address per building.

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Nice idea, but putting it in pracice is difficult, because not all Addresses are eligible for being joined (the table also contains historic data, and I want to join only current addresses). I'd have to duplicate the condition that an address is current, which contains two subselects of its own (yes, it is a complicated schema ...) –  meriton Feb 24 '10 at 21:38
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select b.*, max(a.id) as aid 
from building b 
left outer join addresses a on (a.buildingid = b.id) 
group by a.buildingid 

or

select b.*, maxid
from building b 
left outer join 
(
 select buildingid, max(id) as maxid
 from addresses
 group by buildingid 
) a on (a.buildingid = b.id) 
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Won't the first one fail because the b.* is not being aggregated? –  aw crud Feb 24 '10 at 22:14
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Meriton,

This approach uses nested inline views. I've proven this approach on large data sets, it performs very well.

The best way to understand the query is to start from the inner-most "M" inline view. I added the count for the sake of debugging and clarity. This identifies the maximum (ie. most recent???) address id for each building:

   select maxa.b_id, max(maxa.a_id) a_id, count(*) c
   from address maxa
   group by maxa.b_id;

The next "A" inline view uses the above "M" inline view to decide which address to get, then joins to that address id to return a set of address fields:

  select ma.b_id, ma.a_id, ma.addr1, ma.addr2, ma.addr3, m.c
  from address ma, 
     ( select maxa.b_id, max(maxa.a_id) a_id, count(*) c
       from address maxa
       group by maxa.b_id ) m
  where ma.a_id = m.a_id;

The above "A" inline view delivers a transformed set of addresses to the final query. Whereas the relationship between BUILDING and ADDRESS is 1 to 0..n, the relationship between BUILDING and "A" is 1 to 0..1, a basic outer-join:

select b.b_id, b.b_code, b.b_name, a.*
 from building b, 
    ( select ma.b_id, ma.a_id, ma.addr1, ma.addr2, ma.addr3, m.c
      from address ma, 
         ( select maxa.b_id, max(maxa.a_id) a_id, count(*) c
           from address maxa
           group by maxa.b_id ) m
      where ma.a_id = m.a_id ) a
 where b.b_id = a.b_id (+);

The key advantages with this approach are:

  1. Delivers any number of address columns.
  2. Deterministic, returns exactly the same results each time it is run.
  3. Does not place undue complexities on your final query, which will surely be more complex than this one.
  4. The "A" inline view can be easily encapsulated within a database view, perhaps call it the LATEST_ADDRESS view:
create view latest_address (b_id, a_id, addr1, addr2, addr3, c) as
select ma.b_id, ma.a_id, ma.addr1, ma.addr2, ma.addr3, m.c
 from address ma, 
    ( select maxa.b_id, max(maxa.a_id) a_id, count(*) c
      from address maxa
      group by maxa.b_id ) m
 where ma.a_id = m.a_id;

select b.b_id, b.b_code, b.b_name, a.*
 from building b, latest_address a
 where b.b_id = a.b_id (+);

Enjoy!
Matthew

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