Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following string read from an XML elememnt, and it is assigned to a variable called filename. I don't know how to make this any clearer as saying filename = the following string, without leading someone to think that I have a string literal then.

\\server\data\uploads\0224.1307.Varallo.mov

when I try and pass this to

os.path.basename(filename)

I get the following

\\server\\data\\uploads\x124.1307.Varallo.mov

I tried filename.replace('\\','\\\\') but that doesn't work either. os.path.basename(filename) then returns the following.

\\\\server\\data\\uploads\\0224.1307.Varallo.mov

Notice that the \0 is now not being converted to \x but now it doesn't process the string at all.

what can I do to my filename variable to get this String in a proper state so that os.path.basename() will actually give me back the basename. I am on OSX so the uncpath stuff is not available.

All attempts to replace the \ with \\ manually fail because of the \0 getting converted to \x in the beginning of the basename.

NOTE: this is NOT a string literal so r'' doesn't work.

share|improve this question
    
It's not particularly clear what your problem is. The backslashes seem to be escaped correctly... –  Chinmay Kanchi Feb 24 '10 at 21:36
2  
We need more information. What exactly is in the variable filename? To answer, use print repr(filename) and add the results to your question above. –  nosklo Feb 24 '10 at 21:38
    
Backslashes in non-literal strings are just backslashes. Nothing special about them. If that's the exact string you have, it's equivalent to the string literal "\\\\server\\data\\uploads\\0224.1307.Varallo.mov". –  Anon. Feb 24 '10 at 21:39
    
no they are not os.path.basename() is converting the \0 to \x as per my example –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 24 '10 at 21:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

We need more information. What exactly is in the variable filename? To answer, use print repr(filename) and add the results to your question above.


Wild guess

DISCLAIMER: This is a guess - try:

import ntpath
print ntpath.basename(filename)
share|improve this answer
    
This is the syntax for a windows file share, so the windows path module still should be used. Using ntpath works just fine on Mac and does what you want: typing ntpath.basename(r'\\server\data\uploads\0224.1307.Varallo.mov') gives 0224.1307.Varallo.mov as expected. –  Clueless Feb 24 '10 at 21:51
    
READ FOR COMPREHENSION I AM NOT WORKING WITH A STRING LITERAL! –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 24 '10 at 21:55
2  
@fuzzy lollipop, the ntpath module exists on OSX and is exactly what you need to deal with UNC paths. Did you try this? –  John La Rooy Feb 24 '10 at 21:57

All the downvoting in the world won't change the fact that you're doing it wrong. os.path is for native paths. \\foo\bar\baz is not a OS X path, it's a Windows UNC. posixpath is not equipped to handle UNCs; ntpath is.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.