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Let's say I have a class called Test with one property called Title with a custom attribute:

public class Test
{
    [DatabaseField("title")]
    public string Title { get; set; }
}

And an extension method called DbField. I am wondering if getting a custom attribute from an object instance is even possible in c#.

Test t = new Test();
string fieldName = t.Title.DbField();
//fieldName will equal "title", the same name passed into the attribute above

Can this be done?

share|improve this question
    
This maybe late, but check out TypeDescriptor and GetAttributes method that takes an instance. Here is a very nice post with same usage: geekswithblogs.net/abhijeetp/archive/2009/01/10/… –  Heikki Ritvanen Jul 17 '12 at 3:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Here is an approach. The extension method works, but it's not quite as easy. I create an expression and then retrieve the custom attribute.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public class DatabaseFieldAttribute : Attribute
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }

        public DatabaseFieldAttribute(string name)
        {
            this.Name = name;
        }
    }

    public static class MyClassExtensions
    {
        public static string DbField<T>(this T obj, Expression<Func<T, string>> value)
        {
            var memberExpression = value.Body as MemberExpression;
            var attr = memberExpression.Member.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DatabaseFieldAttribute), true);
            return ((DatabaseFieldAttribute)attr[0]).Name;
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var p = new Program();
            Console.WriteLine("DbField = '{0}'", p.DbField(v => v.Title));

        }
        [DatabaseField("title")]
        public string Title { get; set; }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to work when Program.Title is not a string, a Guid for instance. –  user2320724 Nov 14 '13 at 3:29
    
I like this answer, but I would use two generic types so that you aren't constrained to one type as in the problem mentioned by @user2320724. Signature might look like public static string DbField<T1, T2>(this T obj, Expression<Func<T1, T2>> value) –  Adam Venezia Jan 20 at 22:36

It is, but ultimately it's going to be a roundabout way, since you will get the Type instance from calling GetType on your instance that exposes the property, and then work on that(more often than not).

In this specific case, your extension method isn't going to be able to get the attribute information because all you are passing to it is a string.

Ultimately, what you need is something to get the PropertyInfo for the property from. Other answers are referring to the Type, what they lack is, this is not the only way to get the attribute information at the PropertyInfo which you want.

You can do that by passing a Type instance with a string, presumably, with the property name, so you can call GetProperty on the Type.

Another way of doing this since C# 3.0 has been to have a method that takes an Expression<T> and then use the parts of the Expression to get at the PropertyInfo. In this case, you would take an Expression<Func<string>> or something where TResult is string.

Once you have the PropertyInfo, you can call GetCustomAttributes on it, and look for your attribute.

The advantage to the expression approach is that Expression<T> derives from LambdaExpression, which you can call Compile on, and then call to get the actual value, if you need it.

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namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Test t = new Test();

            Console.WriteLine(t.FieldName("Title").FieldName<DatabaseFieldAttribute>());
            Console.WriteLine(t.FieldName("Title").FieldIsPrimaryKey<DatabaseFieldAttribute>());
        }


    }

    public class Test
    {
        [DatabaseField("titlezzz", true)]
        public string Title
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
    }


    public class BaseDatabaseFieldAttribute : Attribute
    {
        private readonly string _name;

        public string Name { get { return _name; } }

        public BaseDatabaseFieldAttribute(string name)
        {
            _name = name;
        }
    }
    public class DatabaseFieldAttribute : BaseDatabaseFieldAttribute
    {
        private readonly bool _isPrimaryKey;

        public bool IsPrimaryKey { get { return _isPrimaryKey; } }

        public DatabaseFieldAttribute(string name, bool isPrimaryKey): base(name)
        {
            _isPrimaryKey = isPrimaryKey;
        }
    }

    public static class Helper
    {

        public static PropertyInfo FieldName(this object obj, string propertyName)
        {
            return obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName);
        }

        public static string FieldName<T>(this PropertyInfo property) where T: BaseDatabaseFieldAttribute
        {
            object[] os = property.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(T), false);

            if (os != null && os.Length >= 1)
                return (os[0] as T).Name;
            else
                return "N/A";
        }

        public static bool? FieldIsPrimaryKey<T>(this PropertyInfo property) where T : DatabaseFieldAttribute
        {
            object[] os = property.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(T), false);

            if (os != null && os.Length >= 1)
                return (os[0] as T).IsPrimaryKey;
            else
                return null;
        }
    }


}
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This will get the value, but not via an extension method as the asker had proposed. –  NerdFury Feb 24 '10 at 21:57
    
Have a look at. –  garik Feb 24 '10 at 22:09
    
Looks good...the only thing I would look for next is to somehow make this statement dynamic so it can be used by many different properties of that object: GetProperty("Title") –  kabucey Feb 24 '10 at 22:12
    
Have a look at it now –  garik Feb 24 '10 at 22:21

As as been pointed out, it's not possible with the syntax the original poster described, because you can't get a reference to PropertyInfo inside the extension method. What about something like this:

// Extension method
public static string GetDbField(this object obj, string propertyName)
{
    PropertyInfo prop = obj.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName);
    object[] dbFieldAtts = prop.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DatabaseFieldAttribute), true);

    if (dbFieldAtts != null && dbFieldAtts.Length > 0)
    {
        return ((DatabaseFieldAttribute)dbFieldAtts[0]).Name;
    }

    return "UNDEFINED";
}

You could then get the info as simply as:

Test t = new Test();
string dbField = t.GetDbField("Title");
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In order to get the attribute value, you need the type that the attribute applies to. Your extension method is only getting a string value (the value of Title), so you would not be able to get the actual instance that the string came from, and so you can't get the original type that the Title property belongs to. This will make it impossible to get the attribute value from your extension method.

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@NerdFury: Completely wrong, since the attribute is on the property, you need the PropertyInfo, not the Type. Also, using the Type is not the only way to get the PropertyInfo, there are other ways since .NET 3.5/C# 3.0 to do it. –  casperOne Feb 24 '10 at 21:48
    
fair enough, I should have been more careful with my words. So yes, he needs the PropertyInfo to check for custom attributes, but he still can't get that from an extension method on object and call it on a string. There is no way to get the code written above to give the attribute value. I agree with you, that through Expression Trees, he could do it, but the code would not look like what he wanted his API to look like. –  NerdFury Feb 24 '10 at 21:56

No, it's not possible. The reason for this is that it's the value, and not the property itself that would be sent into any custom extension method that would fetch this information. Once you get into that extension method, there's no reliable way to trace back to the property itself.

It might be possible for enum values, but as far as properties on POCO's, it's not going to work.

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