Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to plot n roots of unity using matplotlib, with each one as a different coloured arrow.

It should look like a star shape, with the arrows equally spaced pointing outwards onto the unit circle.

matplotlib has a function for drawing an arrow, but is there any way to do this using complex numbers, or do I have to convert to real cartesians?

Also, does there exist an array of stock colors, so that regardless of how many roots I wish to display, it will give me an array of distinct colors? (rather than say seven almost identical shades of red)

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
import numpy as np
import pylab as plt
import itertools

n = 13
roots = np.roots( [1,] + [0,]*(n-1) + [-1,] )
colors = itertools.cycle(['r', 'g', 'b', 'y'])

plt.figure(figsize=(6,6))

for root in roots:
    plt.arrow(0,0,root.real,root.imag,ec=colors.next())


plt.xlim(-1.5,1.5)
plt.ylim(-1.5,1.5)
plt.show()

enter image description here

The roots of unity are calculated in a manner similar to this answer.

Update: If you want to use seaborn, you can get unique colors quite easily:

import numpy as np
import pylab as plt
import itertools

import seaborn as sns
n = 13
colors = sns.color_palette("hls", n)
roots = np.roots( [1,] + [0,]*(n-1) + [-1,] )

# Sorted by angle
idx = np.argsort([np.angle(x) for x in roots])
roots = roots[idx]

plt.figure(figsize=(6,6))

for root,c in zip(roots,colors):
    plt.arrow(0,0,root.real,root.imag,ec=c,lw=3)

plt.xlim(-1.25,1.25)
plt.ylim(-1.25,1.25)
plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - For the random distinct color portion, it's often handy to borrow from pandas. E.g. pandas.tools.plotting._get_standard_colors(num, color_type='random') –  Joe Kington Apr 25 '14 at 17:57
2  
@JoeKington Yes, I agree. Typically, I'll pull a brewer color scheme from seaborn. I wasn't sure how complicated I wanted to make the answer, since the heart of the question is about the complex plotting itself - not the color mapping. –  Hooked Apr 25 '14 at 17:59
1  
@Pi As Joe and I mentioned, look into either the seaborn library or pandas for this functionality "out-of-the-box". stanford.edu/~mwaskom/software/seaborn and pandas.pydata.org are good places to get started. –  Hooked Apr 25 '14 at 19:01
1  
@Pi I've added an example using seaborn - it's really quite easy! –  Hooked Apr 25 '14 at 19:08
1  
You could also put the drawing loop under a statement that says with sns.color_palette("husl", 10): and then you don't need to deal with getting the list yourself or passing it to the arrow function. –  mwaskom Apr 25 '14 at 23:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.