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I'm trying to understand how Haskell evalutes pp1 [1,2,3,4] to get [(1,2),(2,3),(3,4)] here:

1. xnull f [] = []
2. xnull f xs = f xs
3. (/:/) f g x = (f x) (g x)
4. pp1 = zip /:/ xnull tail

I start like this:

a)  pp1 [1,2,3,4] = (zip /:/ xnull tail) [1,2,3,4]  -- (rule 4).
b)  (zip /:/ xnull tail) [1,2,3,4] 
       = (zip (xnull [1,2,3,4]) (tail) [1,2,3,4])   -- (rule 3)
c)  -- I'm not sure how to continue because xnull receives a function 
    -- and a param, and in this case it only receives a param.

Any help?

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xnull tail == drop 1, (/:/) == Control.Applicative.(<*>). –  Will Ness Sep 20 at 17:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just keep expanding:

pp1 [1, 2, 3, 4] = zip /:/ xnull tail $ [1, 2, 3, 4]
                 -- inline (/:/) f g x = f x (g x)
                 --  f = zip, g = xnull tail, x = [1, 2, 3, 4]
                 -- therefore: 
                 = zip [1, 2, 3, 4] (xnull tail $ [1, 2, 3, 4])
                 -- inline the definition of xnull and note that the argument is not null
                 -- so we just want f x, or tail [1, 2, 3, 4]
                 = zip [1, 2, 3, 4] (tail [1, 2, 3, 4])
                 -- evaluate tail
                 = zip [1, 2, 3, 4] [2, 3, 4]
                 -- evaluate zip
                 = [(1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4)]

Operator presidence matters. You didn't specify the associativity of (/:/) so it was defaulted to be relatively weak. Therefore, (xnull tail) bound tighter than (/:/).

Also, as a side note, (/:/) already exists in the standard library as (<*>) from Control.Applicative. It's sufficiently general so this might be difficult to see, but the Applicative instance for Reader (or perhaps better understood as the function Applicative) provides this exact instance. It's also known as ap from Control.Monad.

zip <*> tail :: [b] -> [(b, b)]
zip <*> tail $ [1, 2, 3, 4] = [(1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4)]
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I have a doubt. Why is wrong this? /:/ xnull tail [1,2,3,4] = xnull [1,2,3,4] (tail) [1,2,3,4] if I consider f as xnull, g as tail and x as [1,2,3,4]? Thanks again! –  Fof Apr 25 at 18:47
1  
Because of how function binding works. xnull tail binds more tightly than (/:/ xnull). The reason is simply operator precedence rules -- function application (i.e. xnull tail) binds more tightly than operator application (i.e. (/:/ xnull)). You have some control over this, but that should only be exercised very carefully. –  acomar Apr 25 at 18:51
    
Ok, I understand that precedence is important for expression evaluation. But what I don't understand are the expressions for f, g, and x when you apply rule number 3, f = ?, g = ? and x = ? Thanks again! –  Fof Apr 25 at 19:06
1  
Oh! that's a simpler question. f = zip, g = xnull tail, and x = [1, 2, 3, 4]. –  acomar Apr 25 at 19:16
1  
Ok, updated my answer to explain the transformations I made in more detail. –  acomar Apr 25 at 19:19

This is wrong

b) (zip /:/ xnull tail) [1,2,3,4] = (zip (xnull [1,2,3,4]) (tail) [1,2,3,4]) (rule 3)

because it should be

b) (zip /:/ xnull tail) [1,2,3,4] = (zip [1,2,3,4] (xnull tail [1,2,3,4])) (rule 3)

The mistake lies in reading zip /:/ xnull tail as in (zip /:/ xnull) tail rather than zip /:/ (xnull tail).

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1  
Why don't you need a $ to get the zip /:/ (xnull tail) interpretation? –  Mark Reed Apr 25 at 17:44
6  
Because application binds more tightly than any infix operator: f x ++ g x is read as (f x) ++ (g x), and x ++**++ f x is read as (x) ++**++ (f x). Note that $ follows this parsing rule, and /:/ does as well. –  chi Apr 25 at 17:49
    
@chi I have a doubt. Why is wrong this? /:/ xnull tail [1,2,3,4] = xnull [1,2,3,4] (tail) [1,2,3,4] if I consider f as xnull, g as tail and x as [1,2,3,4]? Thanks again! –  Fof Apr 25 at 18:46
4  
@Seba There's no /:/ xnull tail [1,2,3,4] in the first place because (zip /:/ xnull tail) means (zip /:/ (xnull tail)), because as chi points out, function application binds most tightly. –  AndrewC Apr 25 at 19:22

I know this has got a bit old. But anyway, here's my take..

It helps to see the definition

pp1 =  zip  /:/  xnull tail
    = (zip) /:/ (xnull tail)
    = (/:/) zip (xnull tail)

Note the parenthesizes around (xnull tail) indicating function application having higher precedence the infix operators.

Now the definition of (/:/) is to return another function q that would take an argument x and return the result of applying the function returned by partially applying its first argument r to what is returned from applying its second argument s.

That is f would need to be able to take at least 2 arguments, while g need only take at least 1.

(/:/) f g = q 
            where
            q x = r s
                  where
                  r = f x
                  s = g x

Note that r is f x, so q x is f x s.

It would have been clearer to write

f /:/ g = (\x -> f x (g x))

Now given

pp1 = zip /:/ xnull tail 

we can expand to

pp1 = q
      where
      q x = r s
            where
            r = zip x
            s = xnull tail x

or

pp1 = (\x -> zip x $ xnull tail x)

The rest is just replacing x with [1,2,3,4] and do the evaluations.

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