Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a very basic OOP question. I don't want to do a copy of _objectSettings and feel like I'm having a brain fart. The question can be seen in the Getter function in the object.

Example:

public class CoolObject
{
    private Dictionary<long, bool> _objectSettings;
    public CoolObject(){
         //.. do stuff//
    }
    public void UpdateSettings(long, bool){
         // enforce new setting obey's some rules
    }
    public Dictionary<long,bool> GetSettings(){
         // return Dictionary of settings, but not allow users to modify _objectSettings
    }
}

thanks :)

Edit: I'm on .Net 4.0, so the answer I select might not reflect the most optimal solution for future readers.

share|improve this question
    
you need to serialize the dictionary: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms233843.aspx –  SamFisher83 Apr 25 at 21:01
    
Do you want any changes you make via _objectSettings to be visible to any code which has already called GetSettings? –  Jon Skeet Apr 25 at 21:04
2  
@SamFisher83: There's no need for serialization here. –  Jon Skeet Apr 25 at 21:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Either make a copy or wrap your dictionary in ReadOnlyDictionary, .NET 4.5 required, but you can easily implement your own if you are not on .NET 4.5.

public Dictionary<Int64, Boolean> GetSettings()
{
   // Return a snapshot of the current settings.
   return new Dictionary<Int64, Boolean>(this._objectSettings);
}

public ReadOnlyDictionary<Int64, Boolean> GetSettings()
{
   // Return a read-only wrapper around the current settings.
   return new ReadOnlyDictionary<Int64, Boolean>(this._objectSettings);
}

All callers will see modifications to the settings with the later options, while modifications made to the settings after obtaining the snapshot will not be visible with the former option.

If you want protection against unintentional modifications in your own code base both options mentioned are okay but you could also get away with a weaker form of protection by just making the return type IReadOnlyDictionary<TKey, TValue> or IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>. The caller could just cast back to Dictionary<TKey, TValue> and make modifications but this is not a big issue inside your own code base.

public IReadOnlyDictionary<Int64, Boolean> GetSettings()
{
   // Just return the dictionary with property type IReadOnlyDictionary`2 but
   // then evil callers can still do the following.
   // ((Dictionary<Int64, Boolean>)coolObject.GetSettings()).Clear();
   return this._objectSettings;
}

If you expose the object to third party code, for example potentially malicious plug-ins, you really want to avoid this. Further you will have to revoke reflection permission because otherwise third party code could still just get hold onto you private dictionary or unwrap the read-only wrapper and modify it.

share|improve this answer
    
The both options imply through the object contract that the Dictionary can be changed, when in fact it cannot, though I suspect the second option is meant to reaturn a ReadOnlyDictionary instead of a Dictionary. –  Eric J. Apr 25 at 21:13
    
Thanks, that was a copy paste bug. –  Daniel Brückner Apr 25 at 21:15

Try returning an IReadOnlyDictionary.

public IReadOnlyDictionary<long,bool> GetSettings(){
    return _objectSettings;
}

That interface is implemented by Dictionary and does not allow for changes to the Dictionary.

[SerializableAttribute]
[ComVisibleAttribute(false)]
public class Dictionary<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>, 
    ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, IDictionary, ICollection, 
    IReadOnlyDictionary<TKey, TValue>, IReadOnlyCollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, 
    IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, IEnumerable, ISerializable, 
    IDeserializationCallback
share|improve this answer
2  
I don't think that is a good solution, the caller can simply cast it back. –  Daniel Brückner Apr 25 at 21:05
1  
@DanielBrückner: A caller can also use reflection do access the private backing store. The contract is just that, an agreement for how to use an object interface. –  Eric J. Apr 25 at 21:07
    
That requires reflection permission. If you have to really protect your data, for example against potentially malicious plug-ins, you really want to hand out a copy or a read-only wrapper and revoke reflection permission. –  Daniel Brückner Apr 25 at 21:14

You can make the class immutable by making the setter private and injecting the value via constructor.

public class CoolObject
{
    public CoolObject(ImmutableSortedDictionary<long, bool> objectSettings){
         ObjectSettings = objectSettings;
         //.. do stuff//
    }

    public ImmutableSortedDictionary<long,bool> ObjectSettings
    {
        get
        {
            // return Dictionary of settings, but not allow users to modify _objectSettings
        }

        private set
        {
            // enforce new setting obey's some rules
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
coolObject.ObjectSettings.Clear(); and all settings are gone... –  Daniel Brückner Apr 25 at 21:32
    
@DanielBrückner that's correct. ImmutableSortedDictionary should be used. I've updated the answer. –  Jerry Joseph Apr 25 at 22:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.