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What are the worst practices found in PHP code?

Some examples:

  • Use of $array[reference] without single quotes
  • Instance "hidden" variables into inclusion files, which are needed later
  • Lots of recursive inclusion not using "_once" functions

Note: maybe subjective or "fun" if you like.

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closed as not constructive by Peter O., Aziz Shaikh, Corbin, Ja͢ck, evilone Nov 19 '12 at 8:15

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4  
The answers aren't as helpful unless they state why they're a bad practice. –  jgreep Nov 6 '08 at 18:20
1  
the question is ok, there are worst practices in every language. the answers are more like 'language war'. vote to close. –  markus May 6 '09 at 13:57
2  
The worst practice of PHP has nothing to do with code, it's the low cost of entry into developing with it. This is the core source of every problem written in that language has. –  marr75 Jun 19 '09 at 16:15

44 Answers 44

up vote 84 down vote accepted

Using and relying on register_globals. Yuck.

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1  
That will come to an abrupt and ignominious with the release of 6.0. –  Lucas Oman Nov 7 '08 at 15:29
5  
Ahh, register_globals, possibly the biggest reason people will not upgrade to PHP 6. Getting people to upgrade from PHP 4 to PHP 5 was a huge effort already, but getting them onto PHP 6... That will take ages. Anyway, if there was ever justification for creating a time machine, this is it. –  Michael Stum Jan 23 '10 at 1:52
  • Using the dot operator to build query strings from variables, without any form of escaping or variable binding. This still happens a lot.
  • Using extract() liberally to have easy access to variables. We got rid of register_globals only to see it replaced with extract($_POST).
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6  
Extract is almost as dangerous as eval() –  Lucas Oman Oct 24 '08 at 15:31
6  
wtf? extract is awesome when used properly. Using it for $_POST is just damn sick, but you can't blame extract as such. –  dr Hannibal Lecter May 6 '09 at 15:44
5  
I used extract once in a function that took an associative array. The function used output buffering and included a template file, after calling extract on the array passed to it. That way, the template was loaded into a context containing simple variables rather than having to reference them from the array. Isn't this fine usage? –  Carson Myers Jan 3 '10 at 1:03
6  
Extract is PHP's equivalent of pointer arithmetic in C. It's quite handy if you know what you're doing, it's a disaster if you don't. –  Joeri Sebrechts Jan 4 '10 at 13:06
1  
@xy_: if you use this code you could get into problems: extract($_REQUEST); ... if (is_valid_user()) $authorized = true; if ($authorized) risky_business(); –  Joeri Sebrechts Aug 13 '12 at 7:48

using @ everywhere because they're too lazy to use isset()

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1  
@johndodo, but if you are coding to be lazy, you would just turn PHP notices off - since they are more of a good practise thing. They also has an effect on performance, not to mention could hide other, more serious, bugs. seanmonstar.com/post/909029460/… –  Lewis Jul 26 '12 at 15:43

How about Magic Quotes? So evil they've been removed from PHP6.

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1  
Second that. Thank GOD magic quotes are gone. –  Nicholas Flynt Oct 24 '08 at 23:27
50  
Yes, it was like a seatbelt...fastened around the neck. –  micahwittman Oct 26 '08 at 8:57

One company I worked for had written their own shopping cart; on the checkout page the purchase total was calculated and saved to a hidden form field... When you submitted your order it conducted the transaction with the price from that hidden field...

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1  
Isn't this a fiddler example? Tell me you're kidding about this being in the wild... –  marr75 Jun 19 '09 at 16:06
8  
OMFG!!!!! No!!! –  Sepehr Lajevardi Oct 21 '09 at 11:22
4  
:) That's so scary, it makes me laugh... –  Irfy Dec 1 '09 at 15:16
7  
can you post the url of the store? >:) –  nimcap May 24 '10 at 8:50
7  
So what if you set it to a negative number.... >;) –  Gordon Gustafson Aug 27 '10 at 0:47

Programmers thinking that they are 'doing object orientation', when they are actually creating large collections of functions and using hardly any useful OOP practices.

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16  
But I use classes!! class Utility { public static function doX(); public static function doY(); } –  K. Norbert Apr 13 '10 at 13:18
1  
To be fair, classes are kinda useful in lieu of namespaces. As long as you know what you're doing of course ;) –  DisgruntledGoat Mar 14 '11 at 0:04

HTML and PHP and SQL interspersed without any discipline, resulting in an unmaintainable mess.

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4  
I tend to "mix" a lot, but I do all my logic and calculation before lines of HTML. That HTML may include lots of PHP to control formatting based on pre-calculated logic, but I'm generally good about keeping it separated. –  Nicholas Flynt Oct 24 '08 at 23:21
2  
You can mix php with HTML if you do it with care. Only ifs, foreach's and echo's. There is no need for yet another language like smarty when PHP itself was designed as a templating language. Just make sure not to do anything unrelated to ouput (like mysql querys or calculations) in the HTML. –  Pim Jager May 6 '09 at 14:10

HTML + PHP + SQL all nested and messed up together.

Add in a bunch of global functions relying on global variables, and you've got a right mess.

And this was just in the first 30 lines of the index.php file of a major open source project that shall remain nameless...

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13  
How about HTML+PHP+SQL+JS+CSS, I've seen that... –  Dean Rather Oct 24 '08 at 11:32
23  
Let me guess... WordPress? –  Maciej Oct 24 '08 at 14:02
16  
Why remain nameless? Bad coders should be shamed into becoming good coders. WORDPRESS SUCKS. –  Lucas Oman Oct 24 '08 at 15:30
7  
I'm all for proper coding practices and whatnot, but from a user perspective, Wordpress is probably the best blogging software out there. At the end of the day, who cares what the code looks like. –  nickf May 6 '09 at 13:09
3  
@nickf: I do! Cause I have to read it, fix it, tweak it, use it, etc., etc... –  Svish May 6 '09 at 13:45

Web designers thinking that because it is easy to learn PHP syntax that it must be easy to learn to code. PHP is just... a more powerful CSS, right?

They're fans of using Dreamweaver to manage their PHP code, which often means having the same code pasted at the top of every single page on the site. Includes, abstraction, DRY, generalization are all beyond their programming "knowledge."

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22  
Dreamweaver is the source of most PHP evils. It screws up the code formatting, encourages bad css names, and encourages duplicating the layout everywhere thanks to templates and by making it easy to change multiple files. Makes it hell for the rest of us. –  jcoby Oct 24 '08 at 14:12
3  
I agree. I love PHP, don't get me wrong, but any coding project needs to be handled properly. That said, I actually use Dreamweaver, with a couple of rules: It can't type my code for me, and it doesn't get to touch my CSS. So basically, its a CSS highlighting FTP window thing, but that's all I need. –  Nicholas Flynt Oct 24 '08 at 23:30
1  
oooh time to upgrade Nicholas. There's much better software available for you out there. I started learning PHP from the automatically generated code it gave me many moons ago, but thankfully realised that it wasn't a great system for development not long afterwards. –  nickf May 6 '09 at 13:11

Reimplementing the native functions because one did not bother to check the documentation first.

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3  
This has happened to me before... why did I not know basename() existed? –  alex Mar 20 '09 at 1:48
20  
This is also because the naming strategy in PHP is virtually non-existant. There's no way to safely 'guess' a method, let alone their parameters. And the PHP devs are also not really interested in fixing this, I gathered. –  Erik van Brakel May 6 '09 at 14:36
8  
I'm forever checking the docs just to make sure I have the parameters in the right order. There's no standard. For search functions, sometimes haystack comes first, sometimes needle. Gah! –  seanmonstar May 6 '09 at 15:56
2  
PHP's hideous library doesn't help, but this is a problem common in all languages. Half the stories from dailywtf are snippets of someone poorly re-implementing library functions. I was working on a project once my senior year when one of my developers looked at me and asked if I could review his function to convert hex user input to ascii in C, I said nothing and we instantiated code reviews from then on. –  marr75 Jun 19 '09 at 16:03
2  
Hey, at least php.net has the most rockin API documentation of any API out there practically. (I've yet to see a better source of documentation for other languages/frameworks) –  Earlz Apr 13 '10 at 0:01

Take a look at the design of CakePHP. It uses classes without being object-oriented. It duplicates classes within an app layout. It defines methods that take input that doesn't match the method prototype at all. It dumps things in to $this->params, which is a more complicated version of $_REQUEST.

It takes everything that is convenient, wonderful, and fast about PHP and makes it complicated, disturbing, and slow.

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Trying to emulate the strenghts of other languages while forgetting about the elegant simplicity that makes PHP powerful. And overengineering frameworks.

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2  
I wouldn't use word 'elegant' and PHP in the same sentence. I believe the right word is 'pragmatic'. –  porneL Jun 19 '09 at 15:48
3  
The elegance comes from what you do with it. Well that's what she said. –  thomasrutter Aug 27 '10 at 3:40

Not validating input.

mysql_query('SELECT * FROM users WHERE user = '.$_POST['user']);

Or:

$_REQUEST['anything']

How often are you not going to know what kind of request you're getting? If anyone has a legitimate use case, please share.

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3  
I built a REST API and at time the requests were in POST and at other times they were GET so I used $_REQUEST –  UnkwnTech Dec 22 '08 at 16:24
1  
Try two different PHP files. –  jmucchiello May 6 '09 at 16:44

"Enterprise error suppression" ;-)

if (some_condition) {
   return false;
   error_log('some error message');
}
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5  
Behind every one of these there'll be a phone call from the boss asking if you could "fix this error that keeps coming up in the logs" –  thomasrutter Aug 27 '10 at 3:41

I know this is an old question, but what I perceive as the worst practice hasn't been posted yet.

The worst practice in PHP is having the language's behavior change based on a settings file. Particularly the settings you can't alter at runtime. It severely affects portability.

PHP6 will be great if not just because it removes the magic quotes settings.

As a side note, PHP5 has two ini files. From memory, here are some of the differences between them:

php.ini-dist

  • magic_quotes_gpc = On
  • display_errors = On
  • arg_separator.input = "&"

php.ini-recommended

  • magic_quotes_gpc = Off
  • display_errors = Off
  • arg_separator.input = "&;"
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Spoted this little snippet on a forum I am a member of, made me unhappy:

$str = file_get_contents("db-info.php");

$str = str_replace("<?", "", $str);
$str = str_replace("?>", "", $str);

eval($str); 
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1  
lol. this one here is hilarious! –  maraspin Mar 18 '12 at 22:50

Setting up a system that uses an id field from $_GET to access a particular data record, then not checking group-permissions when the user just starts incrementing the id in the url. Very bad when the page displays information like SS#'s, addresses, etc.

ex: user_record.php?user_id=1

Either obfuscate the user_id in the url with some kind of salted hash, or check that the user has permission to be viewing the page. Better yet, do both.

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4  
There's been stuff on dailywtf about entire queries in the URL. –  chaos May 6 '09 at 15:43
1  
Why obfuscate? What's so bad about going through news section of a website by incrementing id in the url. saves a lot of time... –  Ivan Mar 2 '11 at 11:08

There are a few. And they usually come together :)

  • No functions or few functions 300+ lines long. Classes? Yeah, right...
  • When code is mixed with HTML the indentation is just random.
  • "select count(*) from users where login = '{$_GET['login']}'...
  • Mixing English with other languages within code
  • Copy & Paste methodology - why bother using functions when you can copy the blob of code, tweak it a bit and it all works?

They are not necessarily php-specific, however those practices tend to show up more frequently in this language.

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The use of short tags <? ?> rather than <?php ?> because other languages also use the <? syntax.

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6  
I don't really agree with that –  Joshi Spawnbrood Oct 29 '08 at 7:47
11  
What don't you agree with? It can conflict with XML and not all hosts support the use of short tags. It's a deprecated practice. –  VirtuosiMedia Oct 29 '08 at 16:11
3  
I agree20% of the time I see code that someone is having problems with they are using <? how much work is just to type the extra 3 characters –  UnkwnTech Dec 22 '08 at 16:25
14  
It's kind of handy when you're not using something like smarty as a template engine. <?=$var?> is a lot easier than <?php echo $var; ?> –  I.devries Jan 19 '09 at 11:39
2  
Agreed with Unkwntech. Those 3 bytes prevent a number of unnecessary headaches. Short tags solve a problem that doesn't exist. –  Legion May 6 '09 at 17:15

renaming plain .html files to .php just to look "cool"

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2  
Or the opposite, adding a php handler for .html files just to hide the fact they use php ;p –  Kevin Oct 27 '08 at 0:38
3  
@Kevin, what's wrong with that? Of course, the mime type has no real place in a good URI but it still beats exposing implementation details by a laaarge margin. So yes, if your server doesn't allow/support something like mod_rewrite, do use PHP handlers for html files instead (+ DirectoryIndex!). –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 12 '08 at 19:44
1  
@Konrad, there's nothing wrong with it besides the fact that PHP has to parse every HTML file called from the server which increases server load. Also, PHP headers usually include "X-Powered-By PHP" which defeats the whole purpose of giving HTML a PHP mimetype handler. –  Kevin Dec 25 '08 at 1:49

I've come across

if ($condition) {}
else {
    // something
}

and

if ($condition) {
    $var = 'foo';
} else {
    $var = 'foo';
}

And the following is actually code written by someone who took Hungarian Notation to the extreme. These are just snippets from a class for manipulating a DOMXML object.

function getAttributes(&$a_oNode)
{
    $l_aAttributes = $a_oNode->attributes();
    if ($l_aAttributes === NULL)
        return array();

    $l_iCount = count($l_aAttributes);
    $l_i = 0;

    for ($l_i = 0; $l_i < $l_iCount; $l_i++)
    {
        $l_aReturn[$l_aAttributes[$l_i]->name()] = $l_aAttributes[$l_i]->value();
    }

    return $l_aReturn;
}

function getText(&$a_oNode)
{
    $l_aChildren = $a_oNode->child_nodes();
    if ($l_aChildren === NULL)
        return NULL;

    $l_szReturn = "";

    $l_iCount = count($l_aChildren);
    for ($l_i = 0; $l_i < $l_iCount; $l_i++)
    {
        if ($l_aChildren[$l_i]->node_type() == XML_TEXT_NODE)
            $l_szReturn .= $l_aChildren[$l_i]->node_value();
    }

    if (strlen($l_szReturn) > 0)
        return $l_szReturn;

    return NULL;
}

Another really bad issue that I have to deal with is the complete lack of consistent indentation, and also inconsistent use of braces, such that you get code like this:

if ($condition)
    foo();

Which lends itself open to a bug because when it's written without indentation, and foo() is inline with the 'if', another developer could miss the condition and add a bar() before foo(), not realising that they've completely changed the flow of logic (it has happened...).

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9  
This is bad code, and has nothing whatsoever to do with PHP, besides the fact that the bad code happened to be written IN PHP. –  MattBelanger Oct 31 '08 at 13:22
1  
The first example reminds me of something I saw in my boss's code: if ($condition) { $yeah = 'y' } else { ...actual pointful code... }. –  thesunneversets Nov 3 '10 at 22:30

By far the worst practice I have ever seen is suggesting that eval() should ever be used under any circumstance what-so-ever. eval() is evil. Never ever use eval(). If you feel like you have no other choice, there's a 99.99% chance you've done something horribly, horribly wrong.

There are also particularly egregious examples of system function misuse (backtick operators, system(), passthru())

@jcoby, I have to disagree with you on DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR. It's a matter of personal preference. I personally prefer the constant as it is more precise. If paths are exported to logs or other displays, I know they are valid without the need for paranoid transformations and can be used by out-of-band scripts. As for readability, the example you gave could easily have been rewritten as:

// Load configuration settings.
require_once(implode(DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR, array(
    SF_ROOT_DIR,
    'apps',
    SF_APP,
    'config',
    'config.php'
));

Which is readable and arguably easier to modify than scanning through a string. I'm not suggesting that using the constant is a better practice, I'm just suggesting that it's a matter of personal preference and consistency should be followed whatever the choice may be.

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5  
eval is not evil. It is evil when you use it with data from the user –  AntonioCS Jan 22 '10 at 17:55

I know this might even sound too wicked to be real, but the worst piece of "software" I've ever had the chance (or disgrace) to put my hands on was a single nK line php file which, I remember, was handling the whole logic for an e-commerce site and was structured like this (including tons of echoed HTML, obviously not properly indented):

<?php

// Obviosly relying on register globals!
switch($page) {

case cart:
echo '<html><head>...</head><body>'. 
               some random application logic, including SQL, of course! .
      '</body></html>';
break;

case checkout:
echo '<html><head>...</head><body>'.
       even more random application logic, including SQL, of course! .
     '<form><input type="hidden" name="total" value="X"></body></html>';
break;

case complete:
echo '<html><head>...</head><body>'.
       and again, some random application logic, including SQL, of course! .
       '</body></html>';
break;

case error:
echo '<html><head>...</head><body>'.
      some random application logic, including SQL, of course! .
     '</body></html>';
break;

// Show the home page
default:
echo '<html><head>...</head><body>'.
     show the home page, if you really don't know what else to do.....
    '</body></html>';
break;

?>

A nightmare, believe me!!! ...and thus the worst coding practice I could think of... If I think about it now, of course it makes me smile though :-)

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Overuse of globally scoped variables in general. And, erm... using PHP ;-)

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1  
Hey, I wanted to write that. :-) –  Tomalak Oct 24 '08 at 11:56
7  
Agree with overuse of scoped variables. Disagree STRONGLY with the bash of PHP, I don't think I would use anything else if given a choice as the backend for my websites. –  Nicholas Flynt Oct 24 '08 at 23:29

I recently rewrote some code written by an employee who obviously didn't know what he was doing.. I ran into a few gems like this..

$sql = "SELECT * FROM attendance_exceptions";
$found = false;

...

$appendSql = " AND YEAR(event_time) = '$_POST['year']' AND MONTH(event_time) = '$_POST['month']' AND DAY(event_time) = '$_POST['day']'";
$temp = array($sql, $appendSql);
$sql = join($temp); 
$found=true;

Creating an array, then join()ing it simply to concatenate a string? I won't get started on the query itself, nor the unsanitized $_POST data.

function verifyQuery($sql, $con) {
    if (!mysql_query($sql, $con)) {
        echo "Error occured in verifyQuery() in sqlfunctions.php <br>";
    	echo "SQL sent : ";
    	echo $sql;
    	echo "<br>Database report: <br>";
        die('Error: ' . mysql_error());
    }
    return mysql_query($sql);
}

Executing mysql_query twice?

Sometimes I wonder if the guy was just trying to make his code look more difficult.

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1  
actually, joining arrays is faster than string concatenation in most languages, not sure about PHP, though. –  I.devries Jan 19 '09 at 11:42
2  
in PHP, strings are mutable, so it's not really worth the WTFery of using arrays. –  nickf May 6 '09 at 13:18
1  
judging from that code sample, i don't imagine the guy was using join() for purposes of speed. –  ithcy Jun 19 '09 at 19:26

These two are not PHP specifics, but please please please please:

  • If you are not english speaker, please do not use your language not english characters on the variable names. Variables named $apáñalo are not funny (and I've even seen wrong behaviours using them)
  • Also, do not use stupid names for variables $what_a_long_variable is not descriptive, and people's mood won't get high
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6  
Using overly short variables are bad also, such as $x, $b, $c, $dcx. –  alexy13 Apr 12 '10 at 23:52

Where to begin, the use of variables that are not defined unless the if(something) is triggered, thus producing lots of errors in the error log.

The use of an array value that does not exists unless it was created prior in if(something), thus spawning more errors.

Not closing a persistent connection to MySQL for a single query in the page...

Including files that have no purpose in the script other than to say give more errors with variables that are not defined.

Running multiple queries to insert data into a table that could have been done in 1 line.

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One programmer in our office did this to add space:

<?php echo '&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;'?>

I was dumbstruck!

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Bad use of the magic method __call(); resulting is some ugly things like the automagically creation of the setter and getter methods via reflection.

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Okay, the answers here seem pretty tame compared to my experience. I once worked on a project where the author had avoided using arrays by using eval instead. Example:

$qty = eval("\$qty_" . $product)
$cost = eval("\$cost_" . $product)

This was to access variables that should have been accessed through $POST or whatever.

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