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char recBuffer[8024];
char* temp = (char*)malloc(65536);
ZeroMemory(recBuffer, 8024);
ZeroMemory(temp, 65536);

bytesRead = recv(_socket, recBuffer, sizeof(recBuffer), 0);

memcpy(temp , &recBuffer, bytesRead );

memcpy doesn't work here. It copies a random char into temp. And if I play around with pointers I can get it to copy the first char of the data received. How do I do this properly?

I want the data recieved recBuffer to be copied into the temp buffer.


Edit: Working code from comment:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char recBuffer[8024];
    char* temp = (char*)malloc(65536);

    strcpy(recBuffer, "Hello\n");

    int bytesRead = 7;
    memcpy(temp , &recBuffer, bytesRead );

    printf("%s\n", temp);

    return 0;
}

EDIT 2 Why this fails?:

#include <stdio.h> 

void Append(char* b, char data, int len)
{
memcpy(b , &data, len ); 
}

int main() { 
int bytesRead = 7; 
char recBuffer[8024]; 
char* temp = (char*)malloc(65536); 
strcpy(recBuffer, "Hello\n"); 
Append(temp, recBuffer, bytesRead);    
printf("%s\n", temp); 
    return 0; 
}
share|improve this question
1  
If this is C++, you shouldn't use malloc nor memcpy. If this is C, you shouldn't cast the return value of malloc. –  dyp Apr 25 '14 at 21:14
1  
See stackoverflow.com/q/605845/420683 If you're writing C, I recommend you should remove the C++ tag. –  dyp Apr 25 '14 at 21:16
2  
Did you #include <stdlib.h> ? –  Martin R Apr 25 '14 at 21:16
3  
It seem you need to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example, as the code as shown in the question is okay. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 25 '14 at 21:25
1  
@MartinR: Yes, malloc is in stdlib.h. memcpy is in string.h. –  Reto Koradi Apr 25 '14 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

Change:

memcpy(temp , &recBuffer, bytesRead );

To:

memcpy(temp , recBuffer, bytesRead );
share|improve this answer
    
gives me access violation reading memory address. Not sure if matters but temp is stored in a struct. –  Vans S Apr 25 '14 at 21:13
3  
That should not matter, as the address of an array (like &recBuffer) is a pointer to its first element anyway (easy to check by printing the address given by &recBuffer and recBuffer, and might as well print "recBuffer[0] at the same time, all three should be the same) –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 25 '14 at 21:16
    
@VansS Did you check that recv() returned something you expect ? I.e. that it didn't fail and returned -1 ? –  nos Apr 25 '14 at 21:17
    
Yup. recv is returning hello –  Vans S Apr 25 '14 at 21:22
    
@VansS The question is, what does recv return? –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 25 '14 at 21:23

Try

memcpy(temp, &recBuffer[0], bytesRead);
share|improve this answer
    
compile error "error C2109: subscript requires array or pointer type" –  Vans S Apr 25 '14 at 21:21
2  
@VansS: recBuffer is an array, therefore &recBuffer[0] should not produce this error. Did you copy/paste your actual code into the question? –  Martin R Apr 25 '14 at 21:27

I have a feeling you are seeing the problem because you don't have

#include <stdlib.h>

I get the same result whether I use:

memcpy(temp , &recBuffer, bytesRead );

or

memcpy(temp , recBuffer, bytesRead );
share|improve this answer

In example 2 char data needs to be changed to char const * data and passed to memcopy as data not &data. Bad question I know.. did not realize..

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