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Can you tell me if I am correct in this question? It's a homework question, I don't want the answer. I just want to make sure that I am correct.

It is possible to declare a method that will allow a variable number of parameters.
What is the symbolism used in the definition that indicate that the method should allow a variable number of parameters?

Answer: varargs

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2  
Since its homework, we don't want to know your question, we just want to know you are learning. –  HDave Nov 18 '13 at 17:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The wording of the question is somewhat ambiguous. While varargs is the technical name for it, I'm inclined to think that the question is actually asking what syntax is used in order to indicate a varargs parameter.

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4  
Perhaps I should add as an addendum that simply putting "..." as your answer might not get the result you hope for. –  Anon. Feb 25 '10 at 1:44

That's correct. You can find more about it in this Sun guide.

Here's an example:

void foo(String... args) {
    for (String arg : args) {
        System.out.println(arg);
    }
}

which can be called as

foo("foo"); // Single arg.
foo("foo", "bar"); // Multiple args.
foo("foo", "bar", "lol"); // Don't matter how many!
foo(new String[] { "foo", "bar" }); // Arrays are also accepted.
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10  
"It's a homework question, I don't want the answer." –  S.Lott Feb 25 '10 at 1:30
4  
I just confirmed the doubt and gave an example. –  BalusC Feb 25 '10 at 11:18
    
Is it possible to do various type of paramteres? e.g. (String...strs, int... ints). What about just any type of argument in any order? –  trusktr Oct 4 '13 at 1:49
    
@trusktr: if you want any object, just use Object.... –  BalusC Oct 4 '13 at 1:51
    
Does that work with primitives too? –  trusktr Oct 4 '13 at 2:12

Yes, it's possible:

public void myMethod(int...numbers) { ... }
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