Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question is about parsing expressions in R language. Let me jump right into an example:

fun_text <- c("
0 -> var
f1 <- function()
{
    0 -> sum_var
    sum_var2 = 0
    sum_var3 <- 0
}

(function()
{
    0 -> sum_var
    sum_var2 = 0
    sum_var3 <- 0
})->f2

f3 = function(x)
{
  0 -> sum_var
  sum_var2 = 0
  sum_var3 <- 0
}

")

fun_tree <- parse(text=fun_text)
fun_tree 
fun_tree[[1]]
fun_tree[[2]]
fun_tree[[3]]
fun_tree[[4]]

After that, we obtain those results:

expression(0 -> var, f1 <- function()
{
    0 -> sum_var
    sum_var2 = 0
    sum_var3 <- 0
}, (function()
{
    0 -> sum_var
    sum_var2 = 0
    sum_var3 <- 0
})->f2, f3 = function(x)
{
    0 -> sum_var
    sum_var2 = 0
    sum_var3 <- 0
})

and

var <- 0

and

f1 <- function() {
    sum_var <- 0
    sum_var2 = 0
    sum_var3 <- 0
}

and

f2 <- (function() {
    sum_var <- 0
    sum_var2 = 0
    sum_var3 <- 0
})

and

f3 = function(x) {
    sum_var <- 0
    sum_var2 = 0
    sum_var3 <- 0
}

As you can see, all "->" assignment operators are changed to "<-", but not in the first example ("fun_tree" only). My question is: why is that? and can I be sure that I always get "<-" operator in syntax tree, so I can do not bother myself in implementing "->" case?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried asking the r-devel mailing list? They'll probably have much better idea of what is going on. –  Scott Ritchie Apr 26 at 10:42
    
Just out of interest, did you check length(fun_tree) to be sure there isn't more "hiding" there? –  Carl Witthoft Apr 26 at 11:17
2  
@ScottRitchie I’m not too happy with this advice – it causes exactly the kind of balkanisation that StackOverflow wants to prevent. Why does it matter? Well for one thing, SO is much more searchable (or rather, findable) than mailing lists. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 26 at 11:38
    
That's true, and I'm not in any way suggesting the question shouldn't be asked here. I meant it as a suggestion of another resource to also consult. –  Scott Ritchie Apr 26 at 12:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

can I be sure that I always get "<-" operator in syntax tree

Let’s see …

> quote(b -> a)
a <- b
> identical(quote(b -> a), quote(a <- b))
[1] TRUE

So yes, the -> assignment is always parsed as <- (the same is not true when invoking -> as a function name!1).

Your first display is the other way round because of parse’s keep.source argument:

> parse(text = 'b -> a')
expression(b -> a)
> parse(text = 'b -> a', keep.source = FALSE)
expression(a <- b)

1 Invoking <- as a function is the same as using it as an operator:

> quote(`<-`(a, b))
a <- b
> identical(quote(a <- b), quote(`<-`(a, b)))
[1] TRUE

However, there is no -> function (although you can define one), and writing b -> a never calls a -> function, it always gets parsed as a <- b, which, in turn, invokes the <- function or primitive.

share|improve this answer
    
So is there some history on why -> even exists if it is just reversed during parsing? –  Thomas Apr 26 at 11:53
    
@Thomas I don’t know the reason. I use it sometimes in R’s REPL because I have written a long-ish expression iteratively (i.e. by building it up slowly) and now want to assign its result to a variable without having to retype it, or putting the cursor back to the beginning of the line. Lazy, true. There are a few languages (TI BASIC) which has an assignment from left to right (42 → x). –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 26 at 11:57
    
I agree with Konrad in that I think the reason -> exists is due to convenience. You shouldn't use it in a script but if you're on the command line it's easier to add -> myvar to the end of the line when you forgot to assign it to something and R does offer features that exist solely to make your life easier on the command line. –  Dason Apr 26 at 13:27
1  
A rather off-topic curiosity: did you know that R used to allow _ for assignment? This has been removed in R 1.8.0. –  gagolews Apr 27 at 17:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.