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I searched the internet and the forum now for 3 hours but I cant find the right answer for me.

In the past I only done C ... but now I want to do some Arduino stuff (writing a new Lib) in C++.

Here I have a (reduced) example of my problem:

Class Base
{
public:
    uint8_t buffer[ 20 ];
    uint8_t bufferLength;
protected:
    boolean receiveByte( uint8_t * buf, unint8_t * bufLen );
}

boolean MyClass::receiveByte( uint8_t * buf, unint8_t * bufLen )
{
    if( Serial.available() > 0 )
    {
        buf[ *buflen++ ] = Serial.read();
        return( true );
    }
    return( false );
}

Class MyClass : public Base
{
public:
    void execute( void );
}

void MyClass::execute( void )
{
    if( receiveByte( buffer, &bufferLength ) == true )
    {
        // Do something
    }
}

Why bufferLength doesn't get incremented when I use it's address with the reveiveByte() method in the new inherited class?

share|improve this question
    
How would we know? You didn't provide us with the receiveByte definition. There's a receive method provided, it that what you're asking? Did you mean those methods to be virtual? – Paweł Stawarz Apr 26 '14 at 18:20
    
Just so you're aware, that's not the normal way that a "length" argument is used. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 26 '14 at 18:24
    
If you receive more than 20 bytes you're gonna have a bad day. – Captain Obvlious Apr 26 '14 at 18:29
    
@CaptainObvlious: Serial.read() only returns a single byte, and there's no loops in the code. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 26 '14 at 19:31
    
for sure ... there is a loop like usual in an arduino sketch!^^ but its not in my reduced example ... sorry! ;p – Leeegi Apr 29 '14 at 5:48

Your code does not work because bufferLength is a member variable. A pointer to a class member variable is not the same as a pointer to simple variable.

In C++, remember that member variables are accessed either:

ptrobj->bufferLength = 5;  // via class object instance pointer
aobj.bufferLength = 7;  // via class instance

The address of a member variable is not the address into all memory, it is the address relative to the object. You are coming from C, so it might help to realize that you can replace the keyword "class" with "struct". The class keyword only has different default access, public, private, etc.

Inside a member function access to variables is not truly different that outside, but the compiler is hiding a detail. There is an implicit this pointer that the compiler is adding

void somememberfunction() {
  bufferLength = 7; // you write this code
  this->bufferLength = 7 // this is really the code
  ...

If you write in Python, the compiler does not insert the self/this pointer and you constantly have to type self.somevariable.

As written, there is no solution to your problem. Your question can be stated "How can I access a member variable without an object pointer?" This is a common question for C based functions.

You don't state you intent in the above. This is the version I would write

Class Base {
public:
  boolean receiveByte();  // the accessors are public
protected:
  uint8_t buffer[ 20 ];  // the data is encapsulated
  uint8_t bufferLength;
}

boolean MyClass::receiveByte() {
  if( Serial.available() > 0 )  {
    bufferLength++;
    // you would insert protection against overflow here
    buffer[bufferLength] = Serial.read();
    return( true );
  }
  return( false );
}

Class MyClass : public Base {
public:
  void execute( void );
}

void MyClass::execute( void )  {
  if( receiveByte() == true ) {
    // Do something
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i see what you mean.^^ but receifeByte( ) is used with two seperate buffers ... one request and one response buffer. but i changed the function now like so : " uint8_t receiveByte( uint8_t * buf, uint8_t bufLen ); ". When nothing is received it returns NULL ... and when something is received it returns the updared length. the buf-pointer goes right cuz the used buffers/arrays are already class members!^^ but heavy thanks for your answer! ;) – Leeegi Apr 29 '14 at 6:00

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