Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why doesn't this work? the virtual functions GetNOperands() and PerformOp() are defined in the BinaryOp class, and DoOp() is defined in the OpAdd class. The virtual Prec() function from the operator class is also defined in OpAdd. I have researched the "diamond problem" which I presume does not apply to this code as there is only one definition for each function in the derived classes? Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#define PREC_LOW 0
#include <assert.h>

//operator class - abstract
template <class T>  class Op {
public:
    virtual unsigned int GetNOperands() = 0;
    virtual bool PerformOp( std::vector<T>& operands, T& result ) = 0;
    virtual ~Op() {}
};

//binary operator class - for 2 operators - abstract
template <class T> class BinaryOp : public Op<T> {
public:
    unsigned int GetNOperands();
    bool PerformOp(  std::vector<T>& operands, T& result );
    virtual ~BinaryOp() {}
protected:
    virtual bool DoOp( T first, T second, T& result ) = 0;
};

template <class T> class Operator : public Op<T> {
public:
    virtual unsigned int Prec() = 0;    //precedence
};

template <class T> class OpAdd : public BinaryOp<T>, public Operator<T> {
public:
    unsigned int Prec();
private:
    bool DoOp( T first, T second, T& result );
};

template <class T> unsigned int BinaryOp<T>::GetNOperands() {
    return 2;
}
template <class T> bool BinaryOp<T>::PerformOp(  std::vector<T>& operands, T& result ) {
    assert( operands.size() == 2 );
    return DoOp( operands.at(0),operands.at(1),result);
}
template <class T> bool OpAdd<T>::DoOp( T first, T second, T& result ) {
    result = first + second;
    return true;
}
template <class T> unsigned int OpAdd<T>::Prec() {
    return PREC_LOW;
}

int main() {
    OpAdd<int> a;
    return 0;
}

EDIT: Compiler error states:

source.cpp: In function 'int main()':
source.cpp:55:13: error: cannot declare variable 'a' to be of abstract type 'OpAdd<int>'
  OpAdd<int> a;
             ^
source.cpp:30:29: note:   because the following virtual functions are pure withi
n 'OpAdd<int>':
 template <typename T> class OpAdd : public BinaryOp<T>, public Operator<T> {
                             ^
source.cpp:10:23: note:         unsigned int Op<T>::GetNOperands() [with T = int]
  virtual unsigned int GetNOperands() = 0;
                       ^
source.cpp:11:15: note:         bool Op<T>::PerformOp(std::vector<T>&, T&) [with T = int]
  virtual bool PerformOp( std::vector<T>& operands, T& result ) = 0;
share|improve this question
    
Define "doesn't work". –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 26 '14 at 18:59
2  
Well you didn't override the virtual functions of the direct base class Operator<T> (and its base classes) in OpAdd. –  dyp Apr 26 '14 at 19:02
    
I've added the compile error –  joelyboy94 Apr 26 '14 at 19:03
    
Please read it: Cannot declare variable of abstract type / Is abstract because of these pure functions... The compiler is spelling out what exactly is wrong. –  Deduplicator Apr 26 '14 at 19:08
    
but these functions are defined in BinaryOp, which is inherited by OpAdd? –  joelyboy94 Apr 26 '14 at 19:13

2 Answers 2

OpAdd<> is inherithing BinaryOp<>, but also Operator<>, which are both abstract. It should compile if you remove the unnecessary and ambiguous latter inheritance.

template <class T> class OpAdd : public BinaryOp<T> {
public:
    unsigned int Prec();
private:
    bool DoOp( T first, T second, T& result );
};

Another way, which is probably the best one to avoid defining also the Operator<>::Prec() is to set your inheritance to Op<> virtual, like this live demo.

template <class T> class BinaryOp : public virtual Op<T>
...
template <class T> class Operator : public virtual Op<T>
....
share|improve this answer

The error message tells you exactly what the problem is -- the GetNOperands method inherited via the Operator<T> base of AddOp<T> is abstract. Since this is a distinct base from the BinaryOp<T> base (there are two different Op<T> bases that have nothing to do with each other), the fact that the function is defined in the other instance of the base class is irrelevant.

You have two choices of how to fix this:

  1. Make all the public base classes virtual, so that they refer to the same base instance rather than creating a new instance each time you inherit. This makes the inheritance work in a sensible way (how it would work in any other language)

  2. Use only single inheritance -- each class can only inherit (directly) from one base. This avoids generating multiple instances of base classes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.