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I come from Hardware background, basically I code in verilog. My goal is to generate a bunch of random floating point numbers, perform basic operations like addition etc and save the input and output on to a file.This was my approach.

void PrintDoubleAsCBytes(double d, FILE* f)
{

f = fopen("testcases.txt","a");

  unsigned char a[sizeof(d)];
  unsigned i;
  memcpy(a, &d, sizeof(d));
  for (i = 0; i < sizeof(a); i++){
    fprintf(f, "%0*X", (CHAR_BIT + 3) / 4, a[sizeof(d)-1-i]);

  }
   fprintf(f,"\n");
 fclose(f); /*done!*/
}

int main (int argc, char *argv)
{

int limit = 500 ;
double a, b,c,d,e,f;  
double a1, b1,c1,d1,e1,f1;
double result1;              
double result;
int i,j ;           
printf("limit = %d", limit );
srand(time(NULL));
for (i= 0 ; i< limit;i++)
    {

        c= rand();
        d= rand();
        e= rand();
        f= rand();
        a = c*d;
        b = e*f;
        result = a + b;
        printf ("A= %f B = %f\n",a,b);
        printf ("result= %f\n",result);
        PrintDoubleAsCBytes(a, stdout); puts("");
        PrintDoubleAsCBytes(b, stdout); puts("");
        PrintDoubleAsCBytes(result, stdout); puts("");
    }
    for (j= 0 ; j< limit;j++)
    {

        c1= rand();
        d1= rand();
        e1= rand();
        f1= rand();
        a1 = c1/d1;
        b1 = e1/f1;
        result1 = a1 + b1;
        printf ("A= %f B = %f\n",a1,b1);
        printf ("result= %f\n",result1);
        PrintDoubleAsCBytes(a1, stdout); puts("");
        PrintDoubleAsCBytes(b1, stdout); puts("");
        PrintDoubleAsCBytes(result1, stdout); puts("");
    }
}

The code works,but the problem is this is not random enough. So I got a random number generator from the internet

//n = (n * 6364136223846793005 + 1442695040888963407) & 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF;
#define MY_RAND_MAX 0xffffffffffffffffLL
/* the seed                            */
 unsigned long long _myRandseed = 1;

 unsigned long long int (myrand)(void)
 {
    _myRandseed = _myRandseed * 6364136223846793005 + 1442695040888963407;
    return ((unsigned long long int) _myRandseed & MY_RAND_MAX);
 }

 void (mysrand) (unsigned long long int seed)
 {
    _myRandseed = seed;
 }

I want to generate A op B = Result. Put A,B and Result in a file and verify the values with my Hardware. The problem with this is my first code will not have extreme values,rand() function being only 32 bit wide. So I am using this Knuth algorithm to reach these extreme values, but I dont know how to integrate the Knuth code to my code. I dont know how the second code works either.Please help me integrate this to my code.

share|improve this question
    
That's a simple linear congruential pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) with 64-bit coefficients. Of its class, it may well be very good, but the linear congruential class of PRNG is not very good. It is likely to be better than the rand() implementation, though. Look for Mersenne Twister for improvements. There are others too, no doubt. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 26 '14 at 23:13
    
@ Jonathan Leffler Is the Mersenne Twister for Floating point numbers ? – chitranna Apr 26 '14 at 23:25
    
No, but the basic technique for generating floating point numbers in the range [0.0…1.0) is usually to take a random integer and the range over which it can be generated (RAND_MAX, etc), and divide one by the other in floating point. You can then scale that result to cover the range you want. It isn't clear to me what range you get out of the calculation you show. Ignoring division by zero, I suppose the values are approximately in the range 0…2*RAND_MAX, where the 2*RAND_MAX would only occur if you got RAND_MAX / 1 twice in your calculations, which actually would never occur. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 26 '14 at 23:32
    
This assumes you want a uniform distribution over some range. If you want some non-uniform distribution, then you have to work harder, playing with the CFD (cumulative frequency distribution) of the distribution you want, and using the uniform generator to create a value that's supplied to the CFD. You might look at the POSIX drand48() family of functions — drand48() specifically generates uniform double values in the range [0.0…1.0). – Jonathan Leffler Apr 26 '14 at 23:34
1  
Incidentally, opening and closing the file for each number generated is grotesquely inefficient. Open once, write many, close once will be much, much, much faster. And calling the function with an argument of stdout but then immediately overwriting the copy of stdout in the function with the opened file is bizarre. You should drop the FILE *f argument to PrintDoubleAsCBytes() and make it a local variable, and then fix the calls to the function. Or do away with the fopen() and fclose() in the function. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 27 '14 at 0:02
up vote 3 down vote accepted

After some chat (and discussion in comments above), it appears that code like the last loop will do more or less what you want:

#include <limits.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>

#define DBL_FMT "%20.13g"

#define SRAND(x) mysrand(x)
#define RAND()   myrand()

// n = (n * 6364136223846793005 + 1442695040888963407) & 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF;
#define MY_RAND_MAX 0xffffffffffffffffLL

static
unsigned long long _myRandseed = 1;

static
unsigned long long int (myrand)(void)
{
    _myRandseed = _myRandseed * 6364136223846793005 + 1442695040888963407;
    return((unsigned long long int) _myRandseed & MY_RAND_MAX);
}

static
void (mysrand)(unsigned long long int seed)
{
    _myRandseed = seed;
}

static
void PrintDoubleAsCBytes(double d, FILE *f)
{
    unsigned char a[sizeof(d)];
    unsigned i;
    memcpy(a, &d, sizeof(d));
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(a); i++)
    {
        fprintf(f, "%0*X", (CHAR_BIT + 3) / 4, a[sizeof(d) - 1 - i]);
    }
}

static
void print_triple(double a, double b, double c, FILE *fp)
{
    PrintDoubleAsCBytes(a, fp);
    fputs(" + ", fp);
    PrintDoubleAsCBytes(b, fp);
    fputs(" = ", fp);
    PrintDoubleAsCBytes(c, fp);
    putc('\n', fp);
}

int main(void)
{
    int limit = 10; //500;

    printf("limit = %d\n", limit);
    SRAND(time(NULL));

    for (int i = 0; i < limit; i++)
    {
        double c = RAND();
        double d = RAND();
        double e = RAND();
        double f = RAND();
        double a = c * d;
        double b = e * f;
        double result = a + b;
        printf("A = " DBL_FMT " + B = " DBL_FMT " => ", a, b);
        printf("R = " DBL_FMT "\n", result);
        print_triple(a, b, result, stdout);
    }

    for (int j = 0; j < limit; j++)
    {
        double c1 = RAND();
        double d1 = RAND();
        double e1 = RAND();
        double f1 = RAND();
        double a1 = c1 / d1;
        double b1 = e1 / f1;
        double result1 = a1 + b1;
        printf("A = " DBL_FMT " + B = " DBL_FMT " => ", a1, b1);
        printf("R = " DBL_FMT "\n", result1);
        print_triple(a1, b1, result1, stdout);
    }

    for (int j = 0; j < limit; j++)
    {
        union { unsigned long long u; double d; } x1, x2;
        x1.u = RAND();
        x2.u = RAND();
        double result = x1.d + x2.d;
        printf("A = " DBL_FMT " + B = " DBL_FMT " => ", x1.d, x2.d);
        printf("R = " DBL_FMT "\n", result);
        print_triple(x1.d, x2.d, result, stdout);
    }

}

Run on Mac OS X 10.9.2 with GCC 4.9.0, this produces sample output:

limit = 10
A =   8.606494412117e+37 + B =   4.461784133731e+37 => R =   1.306827854585e+38
47D02FE056E8ADCB + 47C0C88AB5A69D25 = 47D89425B1BBFC5E
A =   4.875477687527e+37 + B =   4.218443318926e+36 => R =    5.29732201942e+37
47C256EA0B5B7EA6 + 4789638A81F1CC3C = 47C3ED22B37A9B6A
A =   1.311703459602e+37 + B =   1.708324944676e+38 => R =   1.839495290637e+38
47A3BC7F7920A0DB + 47E010A488742E0B = 47E14C6C80063819
A =   1.839333672306e+37 + B =   1.276632262775e+38 => R =   1.460565630005e+38
47ABACDB083C7EF5 + 47D802C2C0FA8B26 = 47DB785E22021B05
A =   2.353914387867e+37 + B =   8.975219392569e+37 => R =   1.132913378044e+38
47B1B5796592702A + 47D0E16933C87CFD = 47D54EC78D2D1908
A =   1.209020514466e+37 + B =   2.760854660342e+36 => R =   1.485105980501e+37
47A230FA45975C7D + 47809DC5273CBEFD = 47A6586B8F668C3C
A =   4.231518165794e+37 + B =   9.257207810917e+36 => R =   5.157238946886e+37
47BFD59B881DCD28 + 479BDB7E5558B279 = 47C3663D8EB9FCE3
A =   2.816572826125e+38 + B =    5.18380943398e+37 => R =   3.334953769523e+38
47EA7CA705D8F654 + 47C37FD3B034E2D7 = 47EF5C9BF1E62F0A
A =   1.317614921329e+38 + B =   1.598894408791e+37 => R =   1.477504362209e+38
47D8C815C7D43CC4 + 47A80EB79D03DB18 = 47DBC9ECBB74B827
A =   1.852281568426e+38 + B =   2.719747737437e+38 => R =   4.572029305863e+38
47E16B34A6F565C0 + 47E9938DF46CEB8B = 47F57F614DB128A6
A =      0.5419054127641 + B =       1.110894718616 => R =        1.65280013138
3FE1574A052B1D22 + 3FF1C6398A5C0F0E = 3FFA71DE8CF19D9F
A =      0.4308391422824 + B =      0.8782258807113 => R =       1.309065022994
3FDB92DE567C22DD + 3FEC1A6D2984FB68 = 3FF4F1EE2A61866B
A =       1.053301916238 + B =      0.7359190785404 => R =       1.789220994778
3FF0DA531C30E7D0 + 3FE78CA62ADAACDE = 3FFCA0A6319E3E3F
A =       1.435189209897 + B =        0.71555607494 => R =       2.150745284837
3FF6F688F6014ACE + 3FE6E5D5DA8A4803 = 400134B9F1A33768
A =      0.8503432405293 + B =      0.2699886211755 => R =       1.120331861705
3FEB3603070E552F + 3FD1477E5A8F677B = 3FF1ECE11A2B0476
A =       0.665955947542 + B =     0.02482116191733 => R =      0.6907771094593
3FE54F82D8E8A033 + 3F996AB7FABC0F1D = 3FE61AD898BE80AC
A =       1.726152431031 + B =      0.8629732497923 => R =       2.589125680823
3FFB9E5202F301F2 + 3FEB9D7A13A5C938 = 4004B6878662F347
A =      0.7514927400161 + B =      0.6592105774307 => R =       1.410703317447
3FE80C3A80B19FF0 + 3FE51840C7E7BF05 = 3FF6923DA44CAF7A
A =       1.145349157453 + B =      0.4833019852491 => R =       1.628651142702
3FF25359A35C31B0 + 3FDEEE6B732F2811 = 3FFA0EF48027FBB4
A =       5.850104991351 + B =      0.3733994477055 => R =       6.223504439056
40176681EC401265 + 3FD7E5C6CC0F526B = 4018E4DE5901078C
A = -2.180574087284e+227 + B = -2.099187784692e+280 => R = -2.099187784692e+280
EF2268DADA7FF851 + FA2280CD6F3B568C = FA2280CD6F3B568C
A =   -7.50661304263e-16 + B =  1.017368209805e+239 => R =  1.017368209805e+239
BCCB0BA0E4412BEB + 718F3F4ABF6CCE9E = 718F3F4ABF6CCE9E
A =   5.430776049236e-92 + B = -6.352315961987e-295 => R =   5.430776049236e-92
2CFC520AC1FE3515 + 82D9F7084EA54100 = 2CFC520AC1FE3515
A =  5.070358952473e+130 + B = -1.769314199879e-277 => R =  5.070358952473e+130
5B1249739AB2EE4F + 86791757150F9632 = 5B1249739AB2EE4F
A =  3.446146328782e+301 + B =   1.32033245937e+103 => R =  3.446146328782e+301
7E89BAB3A9C1B619 + 5557947E5057EAB4 = 7E89BAB3A9C1B619
A = -2.441132684667e-296 + B = -9.523138912595e-103 => R = -9.523138912595e-103
828FEE0BBF0F0EF3 + AAC11042DCE6AF06 = AAC11042DCE6AF06
A =   4.347273839507e+95 + B =  1.776944086436e+275 => R =  1.776944086436e+275
53CA0D1DE3463F5D + 7914878B4150C7A8 = 7914878B4150C7A8
A =   4.527516369582e-92 + B =  3.352666583198e-220 => R =   4.527516369582e-92
2CF79C329A6EF1D7 + 125E4C2ABD04AD1A = 2CF79C329A6EF1D7
A =  5.417085367504e+305 + B =  5.525537049573e+242 => R =  5.417085367504e+305
7F68AF75FB3BD4E1 + 7254B771827C8BDC = 7F68AF75FB3BD4E1
A =   4.207965266614e-70 + B =  7.685974297165e-157 => R =   4.207965266614e-70
31873BDD67BA3AFB + 1F851AE56E7D646E = 31873BDD67BA3AFB

Clearly, I've cut the number of generated values down enormously (10 instead of 500) for compactness in an answer. I've also formatted the hex so three values are on each line of output, rather than being spread over 3 lines (or more with the puts(""); calls in the original code. I've done some other tidying up, too.

You'll probably want to tune the code that sets the exponent separately from the code that generates the mantissa. The mantissae should be fine, but most of the results in the last sample end up being the same as one of the addends. That's fine as far as it goes, but you probably want to test values that are closer together. So, maybe you extract the exponent from the first number, then nuke the second exponent to be within ±53 of the other (so that some of the bits of the values overlap), or something similar. For multiplication or division, the raw values are probably OK; for subtraction, probably not. You may need to test infinities and NaNs specially too; you'll only occasionally test those. And gradual underflow is another area to test separately.

share|improve this answer
    
Note: it's not actually safe to assume that unsigned long long is exactly 64 bits; it's only guaranteed to be at least 64 bits. Instead, I would recommend using uint64_t, which is defined in <stdint.h>. – Todd Lehman Aug 3 '15 at 0:36
    
Where does the code depend on unsigned long long being exactly 64 bits rather than at least 64 bits? – Jonathan Leffler Aug 3 '15 at 0:38
    
Oh!!! I missed the & MY_RAND_MAX. Sorry about that. Still might not be a bad idea to use uint64_t anyway, though. :-) Also, just for cleanliness, you might want to define MY_RAND_MAX as 0xffffffffffffffffULL instead of 0xffffffffffffffffLL. – Todd Lehman Aug 3 '15 at 0:41

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