Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

how to add the current date in a each record as first column.

Input file:

12345|Test1 
67890|Test2 

expected Output file:

2014-04-26|12345|Test1 
2014-04-26|67890|Test2 

Thanks,

share|improve this question
3  
do you have a script that you've tried? – Martin Serrano Apr 26 '14 at 23:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use awk

awk -vOFS='|' -vcdate=$(date '+%Y-%m-%d') ' {print cdate, $0}' file
share|improve this answer
    
why set -F option ? – Babyy Apr 27 '14 at 0:48
    
@babyy, you're right, not needed – iruvar Apr 27 '14 at 1:10

You can use sed for example:

sed -i  "/^$/ !s/^/`date +"%Y-%m-%d"`|/" data_file
share|improve this answer
    
give error: ideone.com/b5vTXe – Babyy Apr 27 '14 at 0:45
    
@babyy The error you post is not produced by the code above, but by the gawk you use covertly. You can try to remove inner double quotes or replace them with single ones (since they are of no importance there) to see if it can be of any help. I actually wonder what gawk does in your stderr output. – tijagi Apr 27 '14 at 2:11
    
@Babyy: my original answer was sed -i "s/^/`date +'%y-%m-%d'`|/" but it was edited by someone else. I suppose to manage empty lines, but the new command is wrong. – el aurens Apr 27 '14 at 7:10
    
@Babyy you had multiple errors in your transcription. The script itself is fine. ideone.com/rxr5bk – tripleee Apr 27 '14 at 9:29
    
(The clock on ideone.com seems to be off by several days, though.) – tripleee Apr 27 '14 at 9:30
sed -e "s,^,$(date +'%Y-%M-%d')|," file

If you use Linux (more specifically, GNU sed) then you may use in-place editing with -i flag:

sed -i -e "s,^,$(date +'%Y-%M-%d')|," file

Otherwise you have to store results into a temporary file and then rename.

share|improve this answer

If you want to edit the file, why not use ed, the standard editor? the common and nice versions of ed will support the following:

printf '%s\n' "$(date '+%%s/^/%Y-%m-%d|/')" wq | ed -s file

(this will edit the file in place, so make sure you have appropriate backups if you want to revert the changes).

share|improve this answer
    
your suggestion has so many errors! – zb' May 9 '14 at 8:12
    
@eicto please tell me what my errors are (that would be a constructive comment!). Have you actually tried it? – gniourf_gniourf May 9 '14 at 10:52
    
nope it is revenge for your nonconstructive comment :) calm down nothing evil. as myself I would to use perl -pi -e – zb' May 9 '14 at 13:01
    
@eicto revenge? non-constructive comment? – gniourf_gniourf May 9 '14 at 13:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.