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I already know that the new[] operator first allocates memory and then calls the constructor for each element and that the delete[] operator first calls the destructor for each element and then frees memory and, because of that, they both have an O(n) time complexity.

But if I have a class, for which I have not defined any constructor/destructor, will the complexity still be O(n), or will it be just O(1)?

For instance, if I have two classes:

class foo
{
public:
    int a;
    foo()
    {
        a = 0;
        // more stuff
    }
    ~foo()
    {
        a = 1;
        // some useful stuff here
    }
};

class boo
{
public:
    int a;
};

And I create two arrays of them like this:

int n = 1000;
foo* pfoo = new foo[n];
boo* pboo = new boo[n];

I'm pretty sure the first new call will have an O(n) complexity, but what about the second? Will new just allocate the necessary memory and that's it, or will it call some default constructor (I'm not sure if such thing actually exits in C++) for each element?

And the same question for delete:

delete [] pfoo;
delete [] pboo;

When I delete the second array will the complexity still be O(n), or will delete just deallocate the memory in O(1) complexity?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

When you don't know, it's great idea to use assembly output. For example, let's assume this is the code to compare.

class foo
{
public:
    int a;
    foo()
    {
        a = 0;
        // more stuff
    }
    ~foo()
    {
        a = 1;
        // some useful stuff here
    }
};

class boo
{
public:
    int a;
};

void remove_foo(foo* pfoo) {
    delete [] pfoo;
}

void remove_boo(boo *pboo) {
    delete [] pboo;
}

When compiling with optimizations using gcc (Clang gives similar output), you get the following result.

    .file   "deleter.cpp"
    .text
    .p2align 4,,15
    .globl  _Z10remove_fooP3foo
    .type   _Z10remove_fooP3foo, @function
_Z10remove_fooP3foo:
.LFB6:
    .cfi_startproc
    testq   %rdi, %rdi
    je  .L1
    movq    -8(%rdi), %rax
    leaq    (%rdi,%rax,4), %rax
    cmpq    %rax, %rdi
    je  .L4
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L6:
    subq    $4, %rax
    movl    $1, (%rax)
    cmpq    %rax, %rdi
    jne .L6
.L4:
    subq    $8, %rdi
    jmp _ZdaPv
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L1:
    rep ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE6:
    .size   _Z10remove_fooP3foo, .-_Z10remove_fooP3foo
    .p2align 4,,15
    .globl  _Z10remove_booP3boo
    .type   _Z10remove_booP3boo, @function
_Z10remove_booP3boo:
.LFB7:
    .cfi_startproc
    testq   %rdi, %rdi
    je  .L8
    jmp _ZdaPv
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L8:
    rep ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE7:
    .size   _Z10remove_booP3boo, .-_Z10remove_booP3boo
    .ident  "GCC: (SUSE Linux) 4.8.1 20130909 [gcc-4_8-branch revision 202388]"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

It's easy to tell that for foo it calls destructor, but for boo it directly calls delete [] function (_ZdaPv after name mangling). This also happens without optimizations. The code is longer, because methods are actually output, but it's still noticeable that delete [] is called directly for boo.

    .file   "deleter.cpp"
    .section    .text._ZN3fooD2Ev,"axG",@progbits,_ZN3fooD5Ev,comdat
    .align 2
    .weak   _ZN3fooD2Ev
    .type   _ZN3fooD2Ev, @function
_ZN3fooD2Ev:
.LFB4:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    movq    %rdi, -8(%rbp)
    movq    -8(%rbp), %rax
    movl    $1, (%rax)
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE4:
    .size   _ZN3fooD2Ev, .-_ZN3fooD2Ev
    .weak   _ZN3fooD1Ev
    .set    _ZN3fooD1Ev,_ZN3fooD2Ev
    .text
    .globl  _Z10remove_fooP3foo
    .type   _Z10remove_fooP3foo, @function
_Z10remove_fooP3foo:
.LFB6:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    pushq   %rbx
    subq    $24, %rsp
    .cfi_offset 3, -24
    movq    %rdi, -24(%rbp)
    cmpq    $0, -24(%rbp)
    je  .L3
    movq    -24(%rbp), %rax
    subq    $8, %rax
    movq    (%rax), %rax
    leaq    0(,%rax,4), %rdx
    movq    -24(%rbp), %rax
    leaq    (%rdx,%rax), %rbx
.L6:
    cmpq    -24(%rbp), %rbx
    je  .L5
    subq    $4, %rbx
    movq    %rbx, %rdi
    call    _ZN3fooD1Ev
    jmp .L6
.L5:
    movq    -24(%rbp), %rax
    subq    $8, %rax
    movq    %rax, %rdi
    call    _ZdaPv
.L3:
    addq    $24, %rsp
    popq    %rbx
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE6:
    .size   _Z10remove_fooP3foo, .-_Z10remove_fooP3foo
    .globl  _Z10remove_booP3boo
    .type   _Z10remove_booP3boo, @function
_Z10remove_booP3boo:
.LFB7:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    subq    $16, %rsp
    movq    %rdi, -8(%rbp)
    cmpq    $0, -8(%rbp)
    je  .L7
    movq    -8(%rbp), %rax
    movq    %rax, %rdi
    call    _ZdaPv
.L7:
    leave
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE7:
    .size   _Z10remove_booP3boo, .-_Z10remove_booP3boo
    .ident  "GCC: (SUSE Linux) 4.8.1 20130909 [gcc-4_8-branch revision 202388]"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

This also applies to new []. _Znam is called directly, without constructing objects, even without optimizations.

Generally, that means custom constructors or destructors mean that new [] and delete [] won't be executed in constant time. But if there aren't, the compiler doesn't try to call constructors or destructors for these, and they will be POD data types, which means that constructing these objects is simple malloc-like call. There are some exceptions (involving various optimizations), but usually code with constructors/destructors will be O(N), and without will be O(1), assuming O(1) new []/delete [] implementation.

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I tried to check the assembly code myself, but it was like alien language. I use Visual C++, but I think its compiler behaves almost the same way like GCC in this case. Thanks a lot for the time you spent documenting your answer. –  Lighthink Apr 27 '14 at 8:21

It depends on your exact syntax:

auto x = new unsigned[2];
auto y = new unsigned[2]();
::std::cout << x[0] << "\n" << x[1] << "\n" << y[0] << "\n" << y[1] << "\n";
delete[] x;
delete[] y;

gives the output (on my machine):

3452816845
3452816845
0
0

Because one will be default initialized and the other value initialized.

delete[] on the other hand is even simpler to understand: If your data type has a destructor, it will be called. The built in (and thus POD) types generally do not.

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But if I have a class, for which I have not defined any constructor/destructor, will the complexity still be O(n), or will it be just O(1)?

The members themselves might still have destructors. In short, for PODs, delete[] will be O(1).

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MyClass *p = static_cast<MyClass*> (::operator new (sizeof(MyClass[N])));

Allocates memory for N objects and does not construct them. In that way the complexity will be the same as malloc(). It will be obviously faster, then allocating and constructing objects of complex class.

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