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I looked through tutorials on how comparator and comparable works but i am stumped on the following: The ComparatorMain class calls

  Collections.sort(listOfCountries,new Comparator<Country>() {

                    @Override
                    public int compare(Country o1, Country o2) {
                        return o1.getCountryName().compareTo(o2.getCountryName());
                    }
                });

but the logic of compareTo() method seems to be doing a comparison by countryId, not countryName:

    package org.arpit.javapostsforlearning;
//If this.cuntryId < country.countryId:then compare method will return -1
//If this.countryId > country.countryId:then compare method will return 1
//If this.countryId==country.countryId:then compare method will return 0
public class Country implements Comparable{
    int countryId;
    String countryName;

    public Country(int countryId, String countryName) {
        super();
        this.countryId = countryId;
        this.countryName = countryName;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Object arg0) {
        Country country=(Country) arg0;
        return (this.countryId < country.countryId ) ? -1: (this.countryId > country.countryId ) ? 1:0 ;
    }

    public int getCountryId() {
        return countryId;
    }

    public void setCountryId(int countryId) {
        this.countryId = countryId;
    }

    public String getCountryName() {
        return countryName;
    }

    public void setCountryName(String countryName) {
        this.countryName = countryName;
    }

}

So how can this possibly work?

Here is the entire ComparatorMain class:

package org.arpit.javapostsforlearning;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.List;

public class ComparatorMain {

    /**
     * @author Arpit Mandliya
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
         Country indiaCountry=new Country(1, 'India');
         Country chinaCountry=new Country(4, 'China');
         Country nepalCountry=new Country(3, 'Nepal');
         Country bhutanCountry=new Country(2, 'Bhutan');

            List<Country> listOfCountries = new ArrayList<Country>();
            listOfCountries.add(indiaCountry);
            listOfCountries.add(chinaCountry);
            listOfCountries.add(nepalCountry);
            listOfCountries.add(bhutanCountry);

            System.out.println('Before Sort by id : ');
            for (int i = 0; i < listOfCountries.size(); i++) {
                Country country=(Country) listOfCountries.get(i);
                System.out.println('Country Id: '+country.getCountryId()+'||'+'Country name: '+country.getCountryName());
            }
            Collections.sort(listOfCountries,new CountrySortByIdComparator());

            System.out.println('After Sort by id: ');
            for (int i = 0; i < listOfCountries.size(); i++) {
                Country country=(Country) listOfCountries.get(i);
                System.out.println('Country Id: '+country.getCountryId()+'|| '+'Country name: '+country.getCountryName());
            }

            //Sort by countryName
            Collections.sort(listOfCountries,new Comparator<Country>() {

                @Override
                public int compare(Country o1, Country o2) {
                    return o1.getCountryName().compareTo(o2.getCountryName());
                }
            });

            System.out.println('After Sort by name: ');
            for (int i = 0; i < listOfCountries.size(); i++) {
                Country country=(Country) listOfCountries.get(i);
                System.out.println('Country Id: '+country.getCountryId()+'|| '+'Country name: '+country.getCountryName());
            }
    }

}

tutorial: http://www.javacodegeeks.com/2013/03/difference-between-comparator-and-comparable-in-java.html

share|improve this question
    
I do not understand your problem. Can you please rephrase your question? –  bitli Apr 27 at 7:58
    
The comparatorMain class has a Collections.sort() with an anoynmous class that has a compare() method. This compare() method calls and returns the result of a compareTo() method from o1.getCountryName() which is just a String. compareTo() has to be implemented in a class so how can a String use it? The only implemented compareTo() method compares countryID not countryName. What am i not understanding? –  user2778481 Apr 27 at 8:12

1 Answer 1

If you use

Collections.sort(countries);

Then the countries will be sorted using their natural ordering, i.e. the ordering defined by their compareTo() method. They will thus be sorted by ID. You can only sort a collection this way if the collection contains instances of Comparable objects.

If you use

Collections.sort(countries, someComparator);

Then the countries will be sorted using the ordering defined by the comparator (someComparator) passed as argument. In your case, since the comparator compares countries by name, they will be sorted by name. You can sort any kind of objects this way.

So, in short, passing a comparator is what allows sorting things by a different ordering than the one defined by the class itself.

share|improve this answer
    
but the compare() method returns o1.getCountryName().compareTo(o2.getCountryName()); so the String countryName of our first object o1 will call its compareTo method pass the second object o2's countryName for comparison. What i am not understanding is how can we do a compareTo() on a string when compareTo() has to be implemented in a class. Second if it somehow did work we would be passing the object but the compareTo() method in the Country class does a comparison on the countryID, not countryName. –  user2778481 Apr 27 at 8:04
    
String also implements Comparable, and you can thus call compareTo on a String, to compare it with another String. –  JB Nizet Apr 27 at 8:11
    
Okay so it is already implemented in the String object is what you are saying? –  user2778481 Apr 27 at 8:14
    
Yes. Strings have a natural ordering, which is the lexicographic order. All the other basic types (Integer, Long, Double, Date, etc.) also have a natural ordering, so that you can easily compare complex objects by their fields. See docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… –  JB Nizet Apr 27 at 8:16

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