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I have a data frame which looks like this

     a    b    c   d
     1    1    1   0
     1    1    1   200
     1    1    1   300
     1    1    2   0
     1    1    2   600
     1    2    3   0
     1    2    3   100
     1    2    3   200
     1    3    1   0

I have a data frame which looks like this

     a    b    c   d
     1    1    1   250
     1    1    2   600
     1    2    3   150
     1    3    1   0

I am currently doing it {

  n=nrow(subset(Wallmart, a==i &    b==j & c==k  ))
  sum=subset(Wallmart, a==i &    b==j & c==k  )
  #sum
  sum1=append(sum1,sum(sum$d)/(n-1))

}

I would like to add the 'd' coloumn and take the average by counting the number of rows without counting 0. For example the first row is (200+300)/2 = 250. Currently I am building a list that stores the 'd' coloumn but ideally I want it in the format above. For example first row would look like

     a    b    c   d
     1    1    1   250

This is a very inefficient way to do this work. The code takes a long time to run in a loop. so any help is appreciated that makes it run faster. The original data frame has about a million rows.

share|improve this question
1  
...and what precisely are you trying to achieve? –  gagolews Apr 27 at 8:53
1  
I don't see a loop. There seems to be something missing from your question. Anyway, never use append in a loop. –  Roland Apr 27 at 8:53
    
Sorry, I edited the question, now it should be easy to understand. Thank You. –  user2575429 Apr 27 at 9:16
1  
@user2575429, I have updated my answer following your edit. –  Henrik Apr 27 at 9:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You may try aggregate

aggregate(d ~ a + b + c, data = df, sum)
#   a b c   d
# 1 1 1 1 500
# 2 1 3 1   0
# 3 1 1 2 600
# 4 1 2 3 300

As noted by @Roland, for bigger data sets, you may try data.table or dplyr instead, e.g.:

library(dplyr)
df %.%
  group_by(a, b, c) %.%
  summarise(
    sum_d = sum(d))

# Source: local data frame [4 x 4]
# Groups: a, b
# 
#   a b c sum_d
# 1 1 1 1   500
# 2 1 1 2   600
# 3 1 2 3   300
# 4 1 3 1     0

Edit following updated question. If you want to calculate group-wise mean, excluding rows that are zero, you may try this:

aggregate(d ~ a + b + c, data = df, function(x) mean(x[x > 0]))
#   a b c   d
# 1 1 1 1 250
# 2 1 3 1 NaN
# 3 1 1 2 600
# 4 1 2 3 150

df %.%
  filter(d != 0) %.%
  group_by(a, b, c) %.%
  summarise(
    mean_d = mean(d))

#   a b c mean_d
# 1 1 1 1    250
# 2 1 1 2    600
# 3 1 2 3    150

However, because it seems that you wish to treat your zeros as missing values rather than numeric zeros, I think it would be better to convert them to NA when preparing your data set, before the calculations.

df$d[df$d == 0] <- NA
df %.%
  group_by(a, b, c) %.%
  summarise(
    mean_d = mean(d, na.rm = TRUE))

#   a b c mean_d
# 1 1 1 1    250
# 2 1 1 2    600
# 3 1 2 3    150
# 4 1 3 1    NaN
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 But for a million observations data.table or dplyr might be preferable. –  Roland Apr 27 at 9:01
    
@Roland, Thanks for your comment! I added a dplyr alternative. –  Henrik Apr 27 at 9:06
    
Thank You @Henrik, specially for answering after edit. –  user2575429 Apr 27 at 10:53

This is the data.table solution per your last edit.

library(data.table)
DT <- setDT(df)[, if(any(d[d > 0])) mean(d[d > 0]) else 0, by = c("a","b","c")]
# a b c  V1
# 1: 1 1 1 250
# 2: 1 1 2 600
# 3: 1 2 3 150
# 4: 1 3 1   0

Edit #2:

@Arun suggestion to speed it up

setDT(df)[, mean(d[d > 0]), by = c("a","b","c")][is.nan(V1), V1 := 0]

Edit #3

@eddis suggestion

setDT(df)[, sum(d) / pmax(1, sum(d > 0)), by = list(a, b, c)]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank You David for suggesting the alternative method. NaN is not an issue I will fix it. –  user2575429 Apr 27 at 10:56
2  
this is a little faster: setDT(df)[, sum(d) / pmax(1, sum(d > 0)), by = list(a, b, c)] –  eddi Apr 28 at 17:46

Here is another way:

Step1: Setup data table:

df <- read.table(text="     a    b    c   d
     1    1    1   0
     1    1    1   200
     1    1    1   300
     1    1    2   0
     1    1    2   600
     1    2    3   0
     1    2    3   100
     1    2    3   200
     1    3    1   0",header=T)
library(data.table)
setDT(df)
setkey(df,a,b,c)

Step2: Do the computation:

df[,sum(d)/ifelse((cnt=length(which(d>0)))>0,cnt,1),by=key(df)]

Note that looping is not recommended here. And best strategy is to vectorize the solution, as in the example above.

Step3: Lets test for timing:

> dt<-df
> for(i in 1:20) dt <- rbind(dt,dt)
> dim(dt)
[1] 9437184       4
> setkey(dt,a,b,c)
> dt[,sum(d)/ifelse((cnt=length(which(d>0)))>0,cnt,1),by=key(dt)]
   a b c  V1
1: 1 1 1 250
2: 1 1 2 600
3: 1 2 3 150
4: 1 3 1   0
> system.time(dt[,sum(d)/ifelse((cnt=length(which(d>0)))>0,cnt,1),by=key(dt)])
   user  system elapsed 
  0.495   0.090   0.609 

So the computation for nearly 10M records is performed in about 0.5 sec!

Hope this helps!!

share|improve this answer
    
two comments - it's not fair to set the key and then leave that out of your timing (not a huge deal, since setting the key doesn't change the speed by too much, but still), and see my comment in the other data.table answer for a simpler way of doing what you did –  eddi Apr 28 at 22:14
    
Thanks @eddi. On the first point: I was trying to illustrate the speed of execution, and as setting the key didn't take much time, so I didn't include it. However, I noticed an important thing here, the 20 fold rbind on dt runs much faster in comparison to the 20 fold rbind on df. Any comments on that?? Second point is very well taken and really appreciated! –  Shambho Apr 29 at 1:38
    
Not sure what to comment except that the data.table rbind is just better :) It uses rbindlist internally, which is really fast. –  eddi Apr 29 at 18:15

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