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I am new to Ruby and trying to solve this question from IOI for my self-study.

I hope this makes sense.

I have the following hash and array. myhash has popularity of sports => cost for construction. Each votes value is the limit for construction. If it is less than or equal to popu_cost's cost for construction, it gets a vote and it will check from the highest popularity. Once it finds, no need to check other sports.

popu_cost = {1=>8, 2=>8, 3=>7, 4=>5, 5=>2, 6=>5, 7=>2, 8=>7, 9=>2, 10=>1}
votes = [2, 8, 4, 1, 8, 2, 10, 3, 2, 2]

Now I want to find hash key where votes element <= hash value and add to results[].For example

votes[0], max cost afford is 2. So hash index 5 since 2 is less than or equal to 2
votes[1], 8 is hash index 1 since 8 is less than or equal to 8
votes[2], 4 is hash index 5 since 2 is less than or equal to 4
votes[3], 1 is hash index 10 since 1 is less than or equal to 1
votes[4], 8 is hash index 1 since 8 is less than or equal to 8
votes[5], 2 is hash index 5 since 2 is less than or equal to 2
votes[6], 10 is hash index 1 since 8 is less than or equal to 10
votes[7], 3 is hash index 5 since 2 is less than or equal to 3
votes[8], 2 is hash index 5 since 2 is less than or equal to 2
votes[9], 2 is hash index 5 since 2 is less than or equal to 2

This should gives [5, 1, 5, 10, 1, 5, 1, 5, 5, 5].

I tried the following but the result is not what I expected.

results = []
votes.each{ |ele| popu_cost.each{ |key, val| 
  if l <= val
  results << key
  end
}}
results

I appreciate any help.

share|improve this question
    
Oh dear another down-vote. Thank you for that. Any reasons for down-vote? – shin Apr 27 '14 at 9:07
    
I'm guessing you'll find insights here: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/252049 – Denis de Bernardy Apr 27 '14 at 9:51
    
The result should be [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1] since you are checking for keys where votes element <= hash value. As all votes are less than the first value, the answer should be one for all of the votes – Sampriti Panda Apr 27 '14 at 9:59
    
shin, I gave my interpretation of your question in my answer. If it is correct, feel free to edit your your question and use what I have written, modified as you wish. If you want to do that, I suggest you remove the line "Now I want use..." and all lines beginning votes[.... I will then remove the text you use from my answer. – Cary Swoveland Apr 27 '14 at 16:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to modify your code slightly. First, however, the question needs to be clarified. My understanding (corrrect me if I am wrong) is that, for each element e of votes, you want to find the first element k=>v of popu_cost for which e >= v, and (if one is found) add the key k to the array result. For example, the first element of votes is 2. The first element k=>v for which 2 >= v is 5=>2, so result << 5.

Note we must assume this is for Ruby 1.9+, as we are depending on the hash to maintain its insertion order.

Here is a modification of your code that creates the desired array:

popu_cost = {1=>8, 2=>8, 3=>7, 4=>5, 5=>2, 6=>5, 7=>2, 8=>7, 9=>2, 10=>1}
votes = [2, 8, 4, 1, 8, 2, 10, 3, 2, 2, 0]

results = []
votes.each do |e|
  key, _ = popu_cost.find { |_, val| e >= val }
  results << key if key
end  
results
  #=> [5, 1, 5, 10, 1, 5, 1, 5, 5, 5]

Note that I've used find where you had each. That was your main problem. You don't want to find all the hash elements that meet the condition for each element of votes, just the first one.

Notice that I added a zero to the example you gave for votes. That was to show that when there is no element k=>v of the hash for which e >= v, no key is added to result.

share|improve this answer

You can easily solve this using .map and .find, where .map applies a transformation to each input element and outputs a list with the result of each transformation, and .find can be used to find the first element of an Enumerable which yields true for a given block.

I use those to do the comparison you specified, and .first will return only the key of the Hash, which is what you were interested in. The -> {[]} part specifies a lambda yielding an empty Array in case nothing was found, so the .first will then yield nil. This can happen when your votes contains a value which is smaller than all elements of popu_cost.

results = votes.map do |vote|
  popu_cost.find(-> {[]}) { |_, cost| cost <= vote }.first
end

# [5, 1, 5, 10, 1, 5, 1, 5, 5, 5]
share|improve this answer
    
Alternatively, popu_cost.find { |_, cost| cost <= vote }.compact.first. – Cary Swoveland Apr 27 '14 at 16:46
    
Actually, find returns an element or nil, so calling compact on nil is no good. An alternative is actually (.find { ... } || [] ).first. In case you want to return nil when nothing matches, which I thought was nice. To always yield a same length result as the votes input – Daniël Knippers Apr 27 '14 at 16:58
    
Yes, of course. I expect I mixed that up with votes.map { |vote| popu_cost.find { |_, cost| cost <= vote } }.compact.map(&:first), which is less efficient than what you have. I prefer the alternative you just mentioned. (I must remember: always test!) – Cary Swoveland Apr 27 '14 at 17:07
    
What is _ in |_, cost|? – shin Apr 28 '14 at 6:34
    
@shin It is the key of the popu_cost Hash (1,2,3,4 etc.), but because it is not used in the find condition I denote it by _. I could have also called it key or some other name. _ is still a "normal" variable but it just makes it clear it is not used. – Daniël Knippers Apr 28 '14 at 6:59

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