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I'm reading the book "Scala in depth", and found some points that I can't understand.

First, let's see the example about "lower bound" and "upper bound" from the book:

type B <: Traversable[Int]  // Upper bound definition
type B >: List[Int] // Define lower bound restriction

I can understand them.

But I see this sentence in page 135:

Specifying lower bound constraints also allows you to utilize members defined on the lower bound. Upper bound constraints don’t imply what members might be on a type but are useful when combining several parameterized types.

I'm thinking is it wrong? It should be:

Specifying upper bound constraints also allows you to utilize members defined on the upper bound. Lower bound constraints don’t imply what members might be on a type but are useful when combining several parameterized types.

shouldn't it?

And in my opinion,

class Hello[T] {
   def test1[U >: T](x: U): U = x
   def test2[U <: T](x: U): T = x   
}

test1 is lower bound and test2 is upper bound, right?

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1  
sounds right to me. upper bounds are the most commonly useful ones. –  Didier Dupont Apr 27 '14 at 11:25
1  
Yeah, definitely a typo in the book. –  ghik Apr 27 '14 at 13:31

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