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I have been trying to get this to work and am beginning to think its not possible to use pipes in this way.

Is this possible? Keeping a pipe open while the parent uses a fgets while loop to push input to the child process? The child process will then detect the input (passed through stdin) and print it to the screen.

If it is not possible, why not?

pipe.c:

#define MAXINPUTLINE 10240

int pid, p[2];
char input[MAXINPUTLINE];

int main(void)
{
    char* arguments[] = {"./bin/child_program", "arg1", NULL};

    if(pipe(p) == -1) {
        printf("Pipe Failed\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    pid = fork();
    if(pid == -1) {
        printf("Fork Failed\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    int status;

    if(pid == 0) {  //child
        close(p[1]); //close stdout
        dup2(p[0],0); //open stdin
        execvp(arguments[0],arguments);
    }
    else { //parent
        close(p[0]);
        while (fgets(input, sizeof(input), stdin))
            write(p[1],input,strlen(input)+1);
        wait(&status);
    }

    return 0;
}

child_program:

    #define MAXINPUTLINE 

    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {   
        char input[MAXINPUTLINE];

        while (fgets(input, sizeof(input), stdin)) { 
            printf(" Input Recieved: %s :",input);
        }

        return 0;
    }
share|improve this question
    
read works much better than fgets when working with other low-level POSIX operating system tools. –  Pavel Šimerda Apr 27 '14 at 9:42
    
The source code is incomplete/incorrect, you're using nonexistent variables there. –  Pavel Šimerda Apr 27 '14 at 9:43
    
are you talking about input in pipe.c? It was declared, just forgot to include it in the question, I will update it. How could I best utilize read to make this work? –  Daniel Jackson Apr 27 '14 at 9:49
    
Better now. Why are you closing stdout? Why don't you close the pipe fd when it's duped. –  Pavel Šimerda Apr 27 '14 at 10:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have a working code for what you are trying to achieve here:

https://sourceware.org/git/?p=netresolve.git;a=blob;f=backends/exec.c;h=026b137973b35a7232b0554a7e7b8dfc1a023051;hb=HEAD#l45

static bool
start_subprocess(char *const command[], int *pid, int *infd, int *outfd)
{
    int p1[2], p2[2];

    if (!pid || !infd || !outfd)
            return false;

    if (pipe(p1) == -1)
            goto err_pipe1;
    if (pipe(p2) == -1)
            goto err_pipe2;
    if ((*pid = fork()) == -1)
            goto err_fork;

    if (*pid) {
            *infd = p1[1];
            *outfd = p2[0];
            close(p1[0]);
            close(p2[1]);
            return true;
    } else {
            dup2(p1[0], 0);
            dup2(p2[1], 1);
            close(p1[1]);
            close(p2[0]);
            execvp(*command, command);
            /* Subprocess error occured. */
            fprintf(stderr, "error running %s: %s\n", *command, strerror(errno));
            abort();
    }

err_fork:
    close(p2[1]);
    close(p2[0]);
err_pipe2:
    close(p1[1]);
    close(p1[0]);
err_pipe1:
    return false;
}

You can consider this function public domain. It accepts a NULL-terminated list of command line arguments including the command itself and it sets the process id and file descriptors to talk to stdin and stdout output parameters.

On top of that you would acquire some knowlege about read/write POSIX-style functions (and syscalls), fgets/fputs and similar (buffered) ANSI-style functions and the bridges between them like fdopen.

This is an untested patch that should IMO be applied to the above code to be fully correct:

    } else {
            dup2(p1[0], 0);
            dup2(p2[1], 1);
+           close(p1[0]);
            close(p1[1]);
            close(p2[0]);
+           close(p2[1]);
            execvp(*command, command);
            /* Subprocess error occured. */
            fprintf(stderr, "error running %s: %s\n", *command, strerror(errno));
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like I also don't close the duped file descriptors here in the child process, which seems to be a bug. But I don't have time to test it now, so please let me know if it works correctly if you close all four file descriptors in the else branch. –  Pavel Šimerda Apr 27 '14 at 10:13
    
Thank you this helped! I fixed the problems you mentioned and used some of your code to help me check for errors. I discovered that using fgets in the child_program was not wise. When I switched to getchar() and began reading the input in character by character, I managed to get things working as anticipated. –  Daniel Jackson Apr 27 '14 at 20:25
    
@DanielJackson: On the other hand, you can use fgets() in the child without limitation and it's in the same family as getchar().You might want to read through some other stackoverflow questions and answers to learn the difference and learn about ANSI I/O buffering as well. –  Pavel Šimerda Apr 28 '14 at 5:49

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