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I was wondering if anyone could help me answer this question. It is from a previous exam paper and I could do with knowing the answer ready for this years exam.

This question seems so simple that I am getting completely lost, what exactly is it asking for? Is the following algorithm to find maximum value correct?

 {P: x≥0 ∧ y≥0 ∧ z≥0 } 
 if (x > y && x > z) 
 max = x; 
 else if (y > x && y > z) 
 max = y; 
 else 
 max = z; 
 {Q: max≥x ∧ max≥y ∧ max≥z ∧ ( max=x ∨ max=y ∨ max=z )} 

The answer must be based on calculation of the weakest precondition for the algorithm.

How do you verify this? It seems to simple.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Indeed, verifying the program is a direct application of Hoare logic (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoare_logic ). What have you tried? Did you read the course documents? –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 27 at 11:27
    
I did.. I don't know how to start.. –  user2988649 Apr 27 at 11:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This question seems so simple that I am getting completely lost, what exactly is it asking for?

The question is asking for you to formally prove that the program behaves as specified, by the rigorous application of a set of rules decided on in advance (as opposed to reading the program and saying that it obviously works).

How do you verify this?

The program is as follows:

if (x > y && x > z) 
 max = x; 
else P1

with P1 a shorthand for if (y > x && y > z) max = y; else max = z;

So the program is basically an if-then-else. Hoare logic provides a rule for the if-then-else construct:

{B ∧ P} S {Q}   ,   {¬B ∧ P } T {Q}
----------------------------------
   {P} if B then S else T {Q}

Instanciating the general if-then-else rule for the program at hand:

{???}  max = x;  {Q}    ,    {???}  P1  {Q}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
{true}  if (x > y && x > z) max = x; else P1  {Q: max≥x ∧ max≥y ∧ max≥z ∧ ( max=x ∨ max=y ∨ max=z)}

Can you complete the ??? placeholders?

share|improve this answer
    
Should it be : {x > y && x > z} max = x; {Q} , {y > x && y > z,max = z} P1 {Q} And how do I calculate the weakest precondition ? Thank you for your time Pascal Cuoq ! I really appericiate it.... –  user2988649 Apr 27 at 11:56
    
@user2988649 Yes, you find yourself having to prove {x > y && x > z} max = x; {Q} on the left-hand side. On the right-hand side, you made a mistake when you applied ¬ to x > y && x > z. The result is not what you wrote: ¬ (x > y && x > z) is equivalent to x <= y || x <= z. The weakest precondition for the program and for the provided postcondition is true. I already filled that in to make it easier for you. Following the weakest-precondition, you would fill in that part last from what has been filled in in the rest of the proof. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 27 at 12:23
    
@user2988649 We are still trying to apply the if-then-else rule to the first if at this point. The generic if-then-else rule says {¬B ∧ P } T {Q}. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 27 at 12:49

@Pascal Cuoq - So in the second placeholder I should enter ¬x > y && x > z ? Is that the whole proof? Probably I need to to something else? Could you correct my answer if it is not correct ?

P1 = if (y > x && y > z) max = y; else max = z;
{B ∧ P} S {Q}   ,   {¬B ∧ P } T {Q}
----------------------------------
   {P} if B then S else T {Q}

Instanciating the general if-then-else rule for the program at hand:

{x > y && x > z}  max = x;  {Q}    ,    {¬ (x > y && x > z)}  P1  {Q}
-----------------
{true}  if (x > y && x > z) max = x; else P1  {Q: max≥x ∧ max≥y ∧ max≥z ∧ ( max=x ∨ max=y ∨ max=z)}
share|improve this answer
    
In the second placeholder, you need to place ¬ (x > y && x > z), as this is how the generic if-then-else rule works. No, this is not the whole proof. Now you need to prove {x > y && x > z} max = x; {Q} (by applying the assignment rule) and to prove {¬ (x > y && x > z)} P1 {Q} (by applying the if-then-else rule again, since P1 is an if-then-else program. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 27 at 13:12

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