Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to compare two dates for my Android application, but I got a really weird issue.

For example:

If I set the back in the past date to 127 days ago:

this.dateEvent = System.currentTimeMillis() - (127 * 24 * 3600 * 1000)

And then compare it to the current date (Days between)

    Calendar sDate = getDatePart(new Date(this.dateEvent));
    Calendar eDate = getDatePart(new Date(System.currentTimeMillis()));

    int daysBetween = 0;
    while (sDate.before(eDate))
    {
        sDate.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
        daysBetween ++;
    }

    while (sDate.after(eDate))
    {
        eDate.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
        daysBetween ++;
    }

    return daysBetween;

It will return 22 which is not at all what was expected.

Did I make something wrong or is that an issue with the Calendar class ?

share|improve this question
    
What does the declaration of dateEvent look like? –  keyser Apr 27 at 13:09
    
You're always adding DAY_OF_MONTH (so, after 31 or 30 or 28 or 29 it will restart counting from 1) instead of DAY. And, in the first case I'd add a NEGATIVE number (-1) –  Der Golem Apr 27 at 13:11
    
Hello, dateEvent is declared with private long dateEvent = 0L;. I've also tried to replace DAY_OF_MONTH by DAY_OF_YEAR, but that didn't solve the issue. –  Manitoba Apr 27 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Please refer this code, this may help you

 public String get_count_of_days(String Created_date_String,String Expire_date_String)
      {


          SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy",Locale.getDefault());

            Date Created_convertedDate=null,Expire_CovertedDate=null,todayWithZeroTime=null; 
            try
            {
                Created_convertedDate = dateFormat.parse(Created_date_String);
                Expire_CovertedDate = dateFormat.parse(Expire_date_String);

                Date today = new Date();

                 todayWithZeroTime =dateFormat.parse(dateFormat.format(today));
            } catch (ParseException e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }


            int c_year=0,c_month=0,c_day=0;

            if(Created_convertedDate.after(todayWithZeroTime))
            {
                Calendar c_cal = Calendar.getInstance();
                c_cal.setTime(Created_convertedDate);

             c_year = c_cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);
             c_month = c_cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);
             c_day = c_cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);

            }
            else
            {
                Calendar c_cal = Calendar.getInstance();
                c_cal.setTime(todayWithZeroTime);

             c_year = c_cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);
             c_month = c_cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);
             c_day = c_cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
            }


            /*Calendar today_cal = Calendar.getInstance();
            int today_year = today_cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);
            int today = today_cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);
            int today_day = today_cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
            */





            Calendar e_cal = Calendar.getInstance();
            e_cal.setTime(Expire_CovertedDate);

            int e_year = e_cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);
            int e_month = e_cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);
            int e_day = e_cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);

            Calendar date1 = Calendar.getInstance();
            Calendar date2 = Calendar.getInstance();

            date1.clear();
            date1.set(c_year, c_month, c_day);
            date2.clear();
            date2.set(e_year, e_month, e_day);

            long diff = date2.getTimeInMillis() - date1.getTimeInMillis();

            float dayCount = (float) diff / (24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);


            return ("" + (int) dayCount + " Days");
      }
share|improve this answer
    
Hello, thanks bug that won't work if date1 points to the same date as date2 –  Manitoba Apr 27 at 13:58

I had the same need, I finally ended up using Joda Time, it is very convenient and offers lots of additional functions including the one you are looking for.

You can download the files from here.

Once you included the jar file into your project, you can easily do for example the following:

int daysBetween = Days.daysBetween(new DateTime(sDate), new DateTime(eDate)).getDays();
share|improve this answer

I've finally found the easiest way to deal with that. Here is my code:

public int getTimeRemaining()
{
    Calendar sDate = toCalendar(this.dateEvent);
    Calendar eDate = toCalendar(System.currentTimeMillis());

    // Get the represented date in milliseconds
    long milis1 = sDate.getTimeInMillis();
    long milis2 = eDate.getTimeInMillis();

    // Calculate difference in milliseconds
    long diff = Math.abs(milis2 - milis1);

    return (int)(diff / (24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));
}

private Calendar toCalendar(long timestamp)
{
    Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
    calendar.setTimeInMillis(timestamp);
    calendar.set(Calendar.HOUR, 0);
    calendar.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
    calendar.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
    calendar.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
    return calendar;
}

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.