Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to imitate the way STL iterators are declared by using inheritance and nested classes.

I have a parent class Iterable with nested class iterator.

class Iterable
{
public:
    class iterator
    { };
};

I have two classes, List and Vector, which inherit from Iterable in order to gain the nested class iterator.

class List : public Iterable
{ };

class Vector : public Iterable
{ };

This allows declaration of iterators like this.

   List::iterator lIte;
   Vector::iterator vIte;

However I would like to have compile time errors when attempting to mix iterators from different derived classes. E.g.

lIte = vIte; // throw a compile error

But, since the iterators come from the same base class, Iterable, the statement above will compile just fine.

An example work around would be to define a new nested class iterator which will inherit from Iterable::iterator in each class that inherits from Iterable (List and Vector). E.g.

class List : public Iterable
{
public:
    class iterator : Iterable::iterator // This "specializes" the datatype of iterator
    { };
};

class Vector : public Iterable
{
public:
    class iterator : Iterable::iterator
    { };  
};

Doing the above will successfully cause a compile time error when attempting:

   List::iterator lIte;
   Vector::iterator vIte;
   lIte = vIte;

However this is a sub-optimal work around as:

  1. It involves code duplication in every class that inherits from Iterable.
  2. It requires C++11 in order for the duplicated iterator classes to inherit appropriate constructors from Iterable::iterator.

My question is, how can I make List::iterator and Vector::iterator different types without duplicating code or using C++11 constructor inheritance?

share|improve this question
    
Iterator are generally intimate with the container on which they're designed to iterate. The iterator classes themselves may have have a common base (or in the case of the std lib, a common base template type), but sooner or later they're going to be specialized to their host. –  WhozCraig Apr 27 '14 at 19:12
    
@Daniel: Your question is good, but I fear that you are running into a dead end. You want to make things compatible through derivation and at the same time require them to be incompatible. I think you should go back one step and ask yourself why you need the common base class in the first place. What would I do with an Iterable in a function like void f(Iterable &iterable);? What are the common operations shared conceptually by all derived class? And the biggest question is: why don't you just use the standard container classes? –  Christian Hackl Apr 27 '14 at 19:18
    
STL is brilliant because it did away with inheritance. –  n.m. Apr 27 '14 at 19:20
    
@WhozCraig You and ChristianHackl are both correct. gha.st pointed out that problem as well in his solution. If you're interested, you can read my comments on his solution as to why I initially chose this approach. However, it is certainly apparent to me now that I should change it. Also I am doing this simply as a learning exercise. And it was certainly successful as I learned a lot :) –  Daniel Apr 27 '14 at 19:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a class template to generate different classes from one common - well template:

template<typename T>
struct Iterable
{
    class iterator
    { };
};

class List : public Iterable<List>
{ };

class Vector : public Iterable<Vector>
{ };

However, while this solves your immediate problem, it does not look like a proper solution.
In fact, it does not really make sense to give Iterable an iterator class at all, unless it is a (potentially polymorphic) base class. After all, iterating over a vector works differently from iterating over an list.

Since you wish to imitate the C++ standard library, you should be aware that ::std::list and ::std::vector do not share any public base classes.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a variation of the Curiously recurring template pattern en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curiously_recurring_template_pattern –  glampert Apr 27 '14 at 19:01
    
My original use case was actually only for a list and a binary search tree. Since each of those data structures uses some type of node class, I had the iterator class manipulate a parent node class that was also defined in Iterable. The parent node class defined common methods such as next() and previous() while the derived node classes from either list or bst defined how they worked. This approach doesn't work for data structures that don't use nodes however such as a vector, so thanks for mentioning that. –  Daniel Apr 27 '14 at 19:16
    
Also I am merely imitating STL as a learning experience. I am not concerned with the formally implementing it. Thanks for mentioning that requirement as well though. –  Daniel Apr 27 '14 at 19:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.