Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given this code:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use warnings;

sub foo {
    return wantarray ? () : "value1";
}

my $hash = {
    key1 => foo(),
    key2 => 'value2'
};

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper($hash);

I get the following output:

$VAR1 = {
  'key1' => 'key2',
  'value2' => undef
};

When I would expect:

$VAR1 = {
  'key1' => 'value1',
  'key2' => 'value2'
};

I understand that a hash is kind-of an even-sized array (as evidenced by the "Odd number of elements in hash assignment" warning I'm getting) but a hash element can only be a scalar, why would the compiler be giving it array context?

I found this using the param function of the CGI module when assigning directly to a hash. The foo() function above was a call to CGI::param('mistyped_url_param') which was returning an empty array, destroying (rotating?) the hash structure.

share|improve this question
1  
an unrelated point: you don't need that '-w' in the shebang line anymore, the 'use warnings' replaces that. (although -w turned on warnings for all packages loaded, not just in the current scope) –  plusplus Feb 25 '10 at 10:36
    
fair enough, that's one of those old habits that doesn't go away easily... vi xxx.pl; #!/usr/bin/perl -w; it just flows :) –  Mark McDonald Feb 26 '10 at 1:30
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The fat comma isn't a special hash assignment operator. It just a piece of syntactic sugar that means "auto-quote the previous thing"

So:

my $hash = {
    key1 => foo(),
    key2 => 'value2'
};

Means:

my $hash = {
    'key1', foo(), 'key2', 'value2'
};

… which is a list and, as willert says:

every expression in a list is evaluated in list context. You can get around this by calling scalar foo()

share|improve this answer
1  
While that's true, why is foo() evaluated in array context there, when it seems to be clearly an element of a list? –  Greg Hewgill Feb 25 '10 at 9:13
1  
@Greg: because there is no such thing as 'array context'. Void, scalar and list is (mostly) all you get from pure-perl. And list context is equivalent to what you seem to think of as 'array context' –  willert Feb 25 '10 at 9:22
2  
Unless you reference the array, it is evaluated to its contents. So for 'my @a1 = (1, 2); my @a2 = (@a1, 3, 5, 8);', the second statement is evaluated as '((1, 2), 3, 5, 8)' and the length of @a2 is 5, not 4. An empty list is effectively ignored. –  Quick Joe Smith Feb 25 '10 at 9:22
5  
Every expression in a list is evaluated in list context. You can get around this by calling "scalar foo()", though. –  willert Feb 25 '10 at 9:58
1  
@Greg for %hash = ( one => 1, two => 2 ) to work, it has to be a list context. –  Brad Gilbert Feb 25 '10 at 16:48
show 5 more comments

An anonymous hash constructor supplies list context to the things inside it because it expects a list of keys and values. It's that way because that's the way it is. We don't have a way to represent a Perl hash in code, so you have to use a list where we alternate keys and values. The => notation helps us visually, but performs no magic that helps Perl figure out hashy sorts of things.

Current context propogates to subroutine calls, etc just like it does in any other situation.

This allows you to build hashes with list operations:

 my $hash = { 
      a => 'A',  
      map( uc, 'd' .. 'f' ),
      return_list( @args ), 
      z => 'Z' 
      };

If you need something to be in scalar context, just say so using scalar:

 my $hash = { 
      a => 'A',  
      map( uc, 'd' .. 'f' ),
      'g' => scalar return_item( @args ), 
      z => 'Z' 
      };
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.