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Tonight I'm attempting to parse words from a file, and I'd like to remove all punctuation while preserving Lower and Upper case words as well as white spaces.

String alpha = word.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z]", "");

This replaces everything, including white spaces.

Operating on a text file containing Testing, testing, 1, one, 2, two, 3, three., the output becomes TESTINGTESTINGONETWOTHREE However, when I change it to

String alpha = word.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z\\s]", "");

The output does not change.

Here's this code snippet in its entirety:

public class UpperCaseScanner {

public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException {

    //First, define the filepath the program will look for. 
    String filename = "file.txt";   //Filename
    String targetFile = "";         
    String workingDir = System.getProperty("user.dir");

    targetFile = workingDir + File.separator + filename;   //Full filepath.

    //System.out.println(targetFile); //Debug code, prints the filepath. 

    Scanner fileScan = new Scanner(new File(targetFile)); 

    while(fileScan.hasNext()){
        String word = fileScan.next();
        //Replace non-alphabet characters with empty char. 
        String alpha = word.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z\\s]", "");
        System.out.print(alpha.toUpperCase());
    }

    fileScan.close();


}

}

file.txt has one line, reading Testing, testing, 1, one, 2, two, 3, three. My goal is for the output to read Testing Testing One Two Three Am I just doing something wrong in the regular expression, or is there something else I need to do? If it's relevant, I'm working in 32-bit Eclipse 2.0.2.2. Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

I was able to get the output you were looking for using this. I wasn't sure if you required multiple spaces to be single space that is why I added the second call to replace all to convert multiple spaces to a single space.

public class RemovePunctuation {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String input = "Testing, testing, 1, one, 2, two, 3, three.";
        String alpha = input.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z\\s]", "").replaceAll("\\s+", " ");
        System.out.println(alpha);
    }
}

This methods outputs:

Testing testing one two three

If you wanted the first character of each word capitalized (like you showed in your question) then you could do this:

public class Foo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String input = "Testing, testing, 1, one, 2, two, 3, three.";
        String alpha = input.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z\\s]", "").replaceAll("\\s+", " ");
        System.out.println(alpha);

        StringBuilder upperCaseWords = new StringBuilder();
        String[] words = alpha.split("\\s");

        for(String word : words) {
            String upperCase = Character.toUpperCase(word.charAt(0)) + word.substring(1) + " ";
            upperCaseWords.append(upperCase);
        }
        System.out.println(upperCaseWords.toString());
    }
}

Which outputs:

Testing testing one two three Testing Testing One Two Three

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Thanks for the time you put into this. This code will be part of a word index program that will only deal with uppercase words, so the strings are getting put through toUpperCase() after this anyways. I can't actually reproduce your output through that code though. I'll edit my full code into the original question. –  alldavidsluck Apr 28 at 4:15
    
Edited my code into the question. I was able to get your piece using a string defined directly working, but if the string comes from a file then it doesn't seem to work which I find odd. –  alldavidsluck Apr 28 at 4:19

i think that Java supports

\p{Punct}

which removes all punctuation characters

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1  
When I use this, it also removes white space. I think it's because I only have single spaces in my test file. –  alldavidsluck Apr 28 at 4:54

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