Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm wondering which approach is better. Let's say we have a method that, for example, sends a notification email.

void SendNotificaitonEmail();

So, I can edit my SendNotificaitonEmail() method so it now does the following:

bool SendNotificaitonEmail(out string errorMessage)
{
    try
    {
        // This is the code that handles the actual sending of the email.
        // ..
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        errorMessage = ex.Message;
        return false;
    }
}

But isn't this wrong, in terms of design? For example, the errorMessage variable has nothing to do with the concept of SendNotificationEmail() method. Moreover, I should then add two new variables to all of my methods - a boolean one, stating the result of the method (true/false), and a string one, containing the error message, if one occurs.

The other way is to create my custom exceptions and handle them in the other methods that are invoking the first one.

public void SendNotificaitonEmail()
{
    try
    {
        // This is the code that handles the actual sending of the email.
        // ..

        if (somethingIsWrong == true)
        {
            throw new MyCustomException();
        }
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        // Other exception handling code.
        // ..
    }
}

public void OtherMethod()
{
    try
    {
        SendNotificaitonEmail();
    }
    catch(MyCustomException ex)
    {
        // Exception handling code.
        // ..
    }
}

Edit Let's say I want to be sure that all of the operations, handled in the DAL code execute successfuly.

I have methods like UpdateUserData, GetUserById, ChangeUserPicture.

So, if I want to check whether these operations have executed successfully, I should add some additional variables like:

bool UpdateUserData(User userToUpdate, out string errorMessage); 
User GetUserById(int id, out bool isError, out string errorMessage);
bool ChangeUserPicture(Picture picture, int id, out string errorMessage);
// ..

I have a simple app that uses all these methods:

string errorMessage;
bool isUserUpdatedSuccessfully = UpdateUserData(someUserToUpdate, out errorMessage); 

if (isUserUpdatedSuccessfully == true)
{
    // If the DAL operation was executed successfully, do something..
}
else
{
    // Code that informs the user that an error has occurred.
    MyCustomErrorLogger(errorMessage);        
}
share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Scary Wombat, Pierre-Luc Pineault, Mena, Soner Gönül, Gert Arnold Apr 28 '14 at 8:13

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
throwing of exceptions to control program flow is generally frowned upon. –  Scary Wombat Apr 28 '14 at 7:45
2  
Exception handling is an better option here... –  KisHan SarsecHa Gajjar Apr 28 '14 at 7:45
    
Please use Code Review when you need advices on code that already works. And please avoid making highly opinionated question on SO. –  Pierre-Luc Pineault Apr 28 '14 at 7:46

1 Answer 1

Treat exceptions as exceptions. Do not use them for normal program flow control.

Return values are for things that you expect are possible.

[The problem handling an exception locally and instead returning an error code is conceptually OK, but only if ALL consumers of that code check the error value, otherwise something bad has occurred and then is ignored.]

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 It's as simple as that. No more, no less. –  Jonathon Reinhart Apr 28 '14 at 7:46
3  
a lot of upvotes for an answer to a highly opinionated question –  Scary Wombat Apr 28 '14 at 7:47
1  
I don't think it is opinionated. It's best practice, as far as I'm aware. –  Mitch Wheat Apr 28 '14 at 7:48
    
Okay, so If I want to check whether everything is okay in all of my methods, I should add similar variables to all of them? bool UpdateUserData(User userToUpdate, out string errorMessage); User GetUserById(int id, out bool isError, out string errorMessage); –  Yulian Apr 28 '14 at 7:50
1  
It is opinionated and off-topic, as far as I'm aware. –  Pierre-Luc Pineault Apr 28 '14 at 7:55

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.